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Ubaldricus Gablinensis (Ubaldricus von Gablingen, fl. 18th cent.)

Ubertino da Casale (1259 - after 1328)

Ubertino de Tornato

Ulrich Beffenhuser (fl. later 15th cent.)

Ulrich von Gablingen (1722-1800)

Ulrich Horn (fl. late fifteenth cent.)

Ulrich Macker (Ulricus Macherus/Ulrich de Delémont, 1724-1804)

Ulrich Weiss (Ulrich Weiß, d. 1763)

Urbanus de Fossa (Urbano Dalla Fosse, c. 1442-c. 1514)

Urbanus de Manfredonia (d. 1578)

>> Urbanus de Neapoli? check!: Alfredo di Landa, ‘Il conventi di Sessa Vecchia in un inedito di Urbano da Napoli’, Studi e ricerche francescane 19 (1989), 129-163.

Urbanus Valerianus de Belluno (Bolzanius/Urbano Veleriani, c. 1443-1524)

Valentinus Kisel (fl. later seventeenth cent.)

Valentinus Mareus (Valentin Marée, d. 1669)

Valerianus Gutowski (Walerian Gutowski/Gutovski, 1629-1693)

Valerianus Magni (Walerian Magni, d. 1661)

Valerianus Berna (Valeriano Berna/da Pinerolo, d. 1617)

Valerius Bonus (Valerio Bona, c. 1560–c. 1620)

Valerius de Venetia (Valerio da Venezia/Valerio Ballardini, d. 1618)

Valerius Polidori (Valerio Polidoro da Padova, fl.late 16th cent.

Varona de Valdivielso (Varrona/Baraona, d. after 1609)

Venantius A. Tyszkowski

Venantius de Carcassonne (Venance Dougados, d. 1794)

Venantius da Fabriano (1434-1506)

Venantius Kindlinger (Nikolaus Kindlinger, Bruder Venantius, 1749-1819)

Véran de Cavaillon (1582-1638)

Vergel de Virginidad (sixteenth-century work by an unknown friar)

Véronica Giuliani (1660-1727) Sancta

Vespasianus Amphiaraeus (Vespasiano Amphiareo/Amfiareo/Alfonso Amfiareo da Ferrara, fl. mid 16th cent.)

Vervoort, see: Franciscus Vervoort

Vicente, see: Vincentius

Vicenzo, see: Vincenzo

Victorin Aubertin (fl. second half 17th cent.)

Victorius de Palermo (Vittorio de Palermo, d. 1635)

Vigilius Greiderer (10, 12, 1715, Kufstein - 26, 12, 1780, Schwaz, Tirol)

Vilém Anton Brauczek (fl. seventeenth cent.)

Vincenzo Berdini (fl. early seventeenth cent.)

Vincenzo Ciorla (Vicenzo Ciorla da Scanno, fl. seventeenth cent.)

Vincentius Coronelli (Vincenzo Coronelli, d. 1718)

Vincentius Cuenca (Vicente Cuenca Pardo, 1767-1845)

Vincentius de Bassiano (Vincenzo di Bassiano, d. 1694)

Vincentius de Monte (Vincentius vom Berg, fl. early 18th cent.)

Vincentius de Orleans (d. after 1674)

Vincentius de Rouen (d. 1658)

Vincentius de Salvador

Vincentius de Sancta Maria (Vicente de Santa María, fl. c. 18th cent.)

Vincentius Ingles (Vincente Inglés, fl. c. 1720)

Vincentius Johannes Bapista Canes (Vincent Canes/Jean-Baptiste, d. 1672)

Vincentius Lunellus (Vicente Lunel, fl. first half 16th cent.)

Vincentius Mazuelo (Vincente de Burgos/Vincente Mazuelo, fl. 15th cent.)

Vincentius Manuelus Castano (Vicente Manuel Castaño, fl. late 18th cent.)

Vincentius Montorselli (Vincenzo Montorselli da Monte Reale, fl. mid 17th cent.)

Vincentius Mussartus (Vincent Mussart, fl. 17th cent.)

Vincentius Venantius (Vincenzo Venanzio da Ancona, fl. mid 17th cent.)

Virgilius, see also: Vigilius.

Vitalis de Furno (Vitalis e Furno; Joannes Vitalis/ca. 1260-1327)

Vitus Chiaramontensis (Vito Pizza da Chiaramonte, fl. late 16th cent.)

Vitus Cortonensis (Vitus de Cortona, fl. 13th cent.)

Vitus Lepori (Vito Lepori da Gorizia, fl. 17th cent.)

Vitus Chiaramontensis (Vito Pizza da Chiaramonte, fl. late 16th cent.)

Volmar (Bruoder Volmar, fl. c. 1390)

Walerian, see: Valerianus

Wager Lewis (d. 1562)

Walram von Siegburg

Walther, see: Galterus (Letter G)

Wawrzyniec Ignacy Bonawentura Bodoch (1607-1691)

Wernerus Ratisbonensis (Werner of Regensburg, d. after 1290)

Werner Saulheimensis (Werner von Saulheim)

Werner Vermann (second half 15th century)

Wiger Trajectensis (Wiger van Utrecht, fl. c. 1230)

William, see: Guilelmus (letter G)

Wistasses (Buisine, fl. ca. 1268)

Wojciech Debolecki (1585–1646)

Wolfgang Schmitt (d. 1779)

Wolfhart (pruder Wolfhart minner prüder, fl. early fifteenth cent.)

Wunibald Bergleitner (1638-1693)

Yves d’Evreux

Yves Magistri (fl. 1611)

Yvo Parisiensis (Charles de la Rue/Franciscus Allaeus, 1588-1678)

Zacharias Boccardi (d. 1760-1833)

Zaccaria Boverio, see: Zacharias de Saluzzo

Zacharias de Salò (d. 1705)

Zacharias de Saluzzo (Zaccaria Boverio, d. 1638)

Zacharias Kirchgesser (fl. first half 17th cent.)

Zacharia Lexoviensi (Zacharie de Lisieux/Ange Lambert/Petrus Firmianus (pseudonym)/Louis Fontaines/Louys Fontaines, sieur de Saint Marcel (pseudonym), 1596-1661)

Zacharias Mediolanensis (d. 1675)

Zacharias Tevo (fl. 17th cent.)

Zapata de Cárdenas (ca. 1510-1590)

Zegers (Nikolaas Tacitus, ca. 1495-1559)

Zenobius Bocchi (Zenobio Bocchi, fl. early 17th cent.)

Zénon de Bergamo (1574-1624)

Zuallart (d. 1672)

Zumárraga, Juan de, see: Joannes de Zumárraga (Juan de Zumárraga, 1468-3 June 1548), Letter J

   



 

 

 

 

 

Ubaldricus Gablinensis (Ubaldricus von Gablingen, fl. 18th cent.)

OFMCap.

editions

Ostensio spiritus et virtutis in privato sermone et publica praedicatione Verbi Dei (Vercelli, 1780).

literature

Lexicon Capuccinum, 533.

 

 

 

 

 

Ubertino da Casale (1259 - after 1328)

According to his principal work, the Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Jesu, he was born in Casale Monferrato (Piemonte) in 1259 and he entered the Franciscan order in 1273. Between 1285 and 1289 he was in Tuscany to pursue his studies and got involved with a circle of devout lay people (among whom the Sienese Peter Pettinagno). In Florence, he also became acquainted with Peter Olivi, who was lector at the studium of St. Croce in Florence between 1287 and 1289.

According to some, Ubertino studied at Paris between 1289 and 1298. The contacts with the tertiary Angela Foligno would have put an end to this part of his life.

According to the majority of scholars, however, Ubertino studied in Paris between 1274 and 1283, which means that he would have gone to Tuscany afterwards (1285-1289). After his stay in Florence, where he worked with/under Peter John Olivi, Ubertino would then have devoted himself to ca. 5 years of preaching in Central Italy, and came in contact with Angelo Foligno.

He was in any case (again?) lector for ca. 4 years (from 1298 to 1302), either at Florence, or (less probable) at Siena. And he spent much of his time preaching in the neighbourhood (especially in Perugia). Apparently, Ubertino was suspended from his preaching tasks, due to his attacks on the regular clergy, his criticism of the papacy of Boniface VIII, and his overt contacts with the spirituals. He was summoned to Rome by pope Benedict XI, but he was soon released, and he was assigned a period of spiritual retreat on mount Alverna (1304-5), where he composed between 9 March and 28 September 1305 the first version of his Arbor Vitae (on the request of the friars of la Verna): a lengthy spiritual-eschatological treatise in five books. The work, which probably received its final redaction between 1326 and 1329, had a reasonable success in Latin, and received a wide range of vernacular adaptations in the late Middle Ages, especially in the Low Countries [There we find manifold direct (partial) adaptations, with titles as Der Rosengarten Jesu und Marias; Vanden inwindigen lijden ons liefs heeren Jesu Christi, Oefening van St. Ubertinus; Hubertynus spreect vander maghet marien, as well as many instances in which the Arbor Vitae is used as source material for other vernacular works of private devotion, such as Johannes Brugman’s Devote Oefeninge and Een trostelic Hantboucxkin, composed by the Carmelite Franciscus Amery. For more information on such matters, see esp. the article of Ruh, Verfasserlexikon² IV, 217ff]

From 1306 onwards Ubertino became a member of the household of cardinal Napoleone Orsini, pontifical legate in Toscane. He was commissioned by the cardinal in 1307 to conduct the process against the sect of the free spirit in Arezzo. He also tried to negociate - without success - a return of the black Guelfs to Florence, who had been exiled by their adversaries. In the context of these activities, he probably met Dante Alighieri. (see Paradiso XII, 124). [He might already have met Dante between 1285-1289, when Dante apparently frequented the Florentine studium of the St. Croce.]

Between 1309 and 1310, Ubertino traveled to the court in Avignon (under Orsini's protection), at a time when pope Clemence V tried to resolve the tensions within the Franciscan order by instituting a committee (filled with friars of both denominations) to look into the problems that fractured the Franciscan Order. Ubertino probably was a member of this committee, and in any case produced a substantial number of polemical writings and actively worked at the papal curia alongside of Angelo Clareno in order to get recognition for the spirituals (autonomy) and to defend the works of Olivi.

The new pope John XXII was more heavy-handed concerning the conflict, however. He believed in obedience and ordered the spirituals to submit themselves. At the same time, he seemed somewhat concerned with Ubertino's wellfare, and the pope had him enter the Benedictine monastery of Gembloux (1317). But it is questionable whether Ubertino ever went there. He continued to work near Avignon under the protection of cardinal Orsini. In 1319 he was accused of heresy by Bonegratia of Bergamo. In 1322, Ubertino once more intervened in a new dispute, which this time was concentrated more closely on the poverty of Christ and the apostles. This new conflict - in which Pope Joh XXII took an active part - ended with a papal condemnation of the Franciscan positions on the absolute poverty of Christ. In this period Ubertino again wrote several polemical statements, which in good Olivian vein stressed usus pauper (without necessarily needing to uphold the fiction of lack of possessions). Several of his arguments probably were used by the pope himself for during his altercations the order about the absolute poverty of Christ and hence the lack of possessions of the order, whichhad made the pope the official owner of Franciscan goods, something the pope wanted to get rid of.

In 1325 a new process of heresy against Ubertino was launched at the curia. But Ubertino escaped arrest by secretly stealing away, again with support of the Orsini's. On 18 april of 1328, Ubertino was in Rome, where he delivered a strong statement against the pope in the presence of the emperor Louis of Bavaria. Thereafter Ubertino's trace is lost. He might have been assassinated, like the spirituals claimed. Or he might have kept out of sight in a Benedictine or even a Carthusian house under the protection of the emperor.

manuscripts

Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Jesu : In all there are 34 mss that contain (parts of) the Arbor Vitae (10 mss contain all the 5 books). For a complete listing, see P.B. Guyot, `L'Arbor vitae crucifixae Iesu' d'Ubertin de Casale et ses emprunts au `De articulis fidei' de s. Thomas d'Aquin', in: Studies Honoring Ignatius Brady, Friar Minor (new York, 1976), 300-304. a.o. Vat.Lat. 4319 and 7732 (see Etzkorn, IVF); Assisi, Bibl. Comunale 338; Toulouse Bibl. Municipale 224. For a very nice early fifteenth-century manuscript that can be read on-line (and downpoaded as pdf), see: http://weblioteca.uv.es/cgi/view7.pl?sesion=201603191458525384&source=uv_ms_0289&div=1&mini=1&mend=60 [the Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Jesu consists of five books: presenting Christ as the actor et materia, finis et forma of this work and life in general. The first deals with the eternal birth of the Son from the father up to the birth of Mary. The second runs from Jesus’ circumcision to the teachings of John the Baptist. The third deals with the preaching of Jesus until the Last Supper. The fourth book exlores the Passion and the Resurrection, until the Ascension of Christ and the ascencion of Mary. The fifth deals with the renovation of faith throughout church history and contains a lengthy Apocalypse commentary, heavily dependent on the Apocalypse commentary of Olivi. The five books together form a tree of life, centered on the incarnation (a simile obtained from Bonaventure’s Lignum Vitae. Book One is the root, Book Two the stemm, Book Three and Four the branches and the twigs, Book Five the fruits.). The work presents the possibility to imitate Christ via meditation on the deeds of Christ during his lifetime (notably the crucifixion). The work therefore offers a method/road of perfection by which the self can be fully transformed into the likeness of Christ. Overall, the Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Jesu is heavily dependent on Bonaventure (esp. Breviloquium, Apologia Pauperum, Ligum Vitae, De Triplici Via), and the writings of Olivi. He also makes abundant use of Thoms Aquinas (Summa Theologiae, De Articulis Fidei et Ecclesiae Sacramentis) , Bernard of Clairveaux (esp. Sermones super Cantica and the Sermones per Annum). Especially in the fifteenth and sixteenth century, the work had a great influence on European Passion devotion, and parts taken from its first four books (whether prose sections or its lamentations and hymns on the Virgin) can be found in many Latin and vernacular prayer books and meditation manuals. The work also had a definite impact in the Observant and Capuchin milieu]

?Tractatus de Septem Statibus Ecclesiae: Paris, BN Lat. 3455 ff. 46-149 (16th cent.)

Tractatus Ubertini de Altissima Paupertate Christi et Virorum Apostolicorum (March-December 1322): MS Vienna Staatsbibl. 809 ff. 128r-159v . Inc: Ego sum via… [Not yet edited? Probably composed between 26 March and 8 December 1322. Largely dependent on the Quaestio VIIIa de Perfectione Evangelica of Peter John Olivi].

editions

Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Jesu, ed. Andrea de Bonetis (Venice, 1485; reproduced with introduction of C.T. Davies (Turin: Bottega d’Erasmo, 1961); a translation of Book IV was printed in 1564 in Foligno by Lorenzo da Foiana OP; A new edition of book four is being prepared by Carlos Martínez Ruiz. A poem on the lamentation of the Virgin at the foot of the cross (Arbor Vitae Book 4, chapter 25), has been edited in D.L. Jeffrey, The Early English Lyric and Franciscan Spirituality (London, 1975), 269-271. See also the studies of C.M. Martínez Ruíz. Book Five of the Arbor Vitae received a partial English translation as: ‘The Tree of the Crucified Life of Christ. Book Five (Excerpts)’, in: Francis of Assisi. Early Documents, Vol. III: The Prophet, ed. Regis J. Armstrong, J.A. Wayne Hellmann & William J. Short (Hyde Park NY-London-Manila: New City Press, 1999), 139-203. A new, Spanish version has appeared as: Arbol de la vida crucificada. Fr. Ubertino de Casale, ed. Luis Pérez Simón, Publicaciones Instituto Teológico Franciscano, Serie Mayor, 46 (Murcia: Publicaciones Instituto Teológico Franciscano, 2007) [see review in AFH 103 (2010), 517f. The 1485 Venice version can now be accessed in digital fashion, for instance on http://www.europeana.eu/portal/record/2022701/oai_bibliotecavirtualandalucia_juntadeandalucia_es_8192.html, on http://fondosdigitales.us.es/fondos/libros/395/502/arbor-vitae-crucifixae-jesu-christi/, or on http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k607511

Rotulus Iste, ed. F. Ehrle, ALKGM (=Archiv für Literatur- und Kirchengeschichte des Mittelalters) 3 (1887), 93-137 [A defense of usus pauper as central element of Franciscan poverty according to the Regula Bullata and Exiit qui Seminat (1279)].

Sanctitati Apostolicae (apology for Olivi, written March-July 1311), ed. F. Ehrle, ALKGM, 3 (1887), 377-416 [Presented at the Council of Vienne, and refutes allegations against the Spirituals and especially the theological, philosophical, and ecclesiological views of Olivi].

Sanctitas Vestra (response to four questions of Clement V, written in 1309), ed. F. Ehrle, ALKGM 3 (1887), 51-89 [Answer to four questions asked by Clement V (1309) on the relationship between the Spirituals and the Free Spirit movement, the existing decadence within the Franciscan order, the abuse of power within the order, and the orthodoxy of Peter John Olivi].

Super Tribus Sceleribus (=Tractatus de Usu Paupere), ed. Albanus Heysse, AFH 10 (1917), 103-174 [Composed between July and August 1311 in answer to the Circa Materiam de Usu Paupere (1309/1310). Ubertino argues again that not solely the renunciation of property but first and foremost usus pauper defines the essence of Franciscan poverty].

Contra Quasdam Responsiones, ed. Ferdinand Delorme, in: Idem, ‘Notice et extraits d’un manuscrit franciscain’, Collectanea franciscana 15 (1945), 72-82.

Declaratio Fratris Ubertini de Casali, ed. F. Ehrle, ALKGM, 3 (1887), 162-196 [August 1311. Ubertino’s final response to the poverty arguments of his Franciscan opponents

Responsio ad Quaestionem de Paupertate Christi et Apostolorum Iussu Ioannis XXII, ed. several times, for instance in the Tractatus fr. Andreae Richi de Florentia OFM contra Fraticellos, ed. L. Oliger, AFH, 3 (1910), 274-75, AF, 2 (1887), 150-51, Wadding, Annales Minorum, 6 (Quaracchi, 1931), 409-10; BF, ed. C. Eubel Vol. V, 233-234 [Advise written in March 1322 for pope John XXII on the issue of evangelical poverty (esp. the question whether it was heretical to affirm that Christ and the apostles did not possess anything). It was one of the many advisory works written on request of the pope when he was planning to solve the poverty issue with a binding statement. See also Ubertino’s unedited Tractatus Ubertini de Altissima Paupertate Christi et Virorum Apostolicorum. Eventually, (with the bull Ad Conditorem Canonum (8 December 1322) and the bull Cum inter Nonnullos (12 November 1323), pope John XXII decided that evangelical poverty did not mean lack of possession (which in effect was not so far removed from Ubertino’s viewpoint: for Ubertino the issue of usus pauper was far more important than the question of dominium). Pope John XXII not only dismissed the construct on the basis of which the Franciscan order could have the use of its convents, churches etc without officially having ownership over it, but also ruled that the doctrine of the absolute poverty of Christ and his apostles was heretical, therewith cutting at the root of the main-stream Franciscan defense of evangelical poverty. This lead to a veritable crisis within the order and caused the dissent of formerly obedient Franciscan spokesmen (such as Bonegratia of Bergamo, Michael of Cesena, and William of Ockham), who themselves were not sympathizing with the spiritual cause].

Reducendo Igitur ad Brevitam (March-December 1322), ed. C.T. Davies, in Studi Medievali, 3rd series, 22 (1981), 41-56 [Writen between 26 March and 8 December 1322. In essence an abbreviation of the Tractatus Ubertini de Altissima Paupertate Christi et Virorum Apostolicorum.

Beatus Vir (doubtful, 1311-1312), ed. A. Heysse, AFH, 42 (1949), 218-235 [polemical work, written by Ubertino or another spiritual spokesman in the context of the council of Vienne. Cf. Ehrle, ALKGM, 3 (1887), 45].

Several other works apparently are lost, such as: Nova Bella Elegit Dominus; Quoniam Constitutionem; Diligenter Attende; Ostendam Vos Fabricatores Mendacii; Ad Evidentiam; Ultimo Ponunt Magistri; Contra Quosdam; Ne in Posterum [in defense of Olivi]; Sermones [although the Arbor Vitae apparently contains some sermon material. See on this the studies of C. Cenci, C.M. Martínez Ruíz, and A. Martini] Litterae. For a short presentation of these lost works, see also the article of Gian Luca Potestà, in DSpir XVI, 13.

literature

F. Callaey, L'idéalisme franciscain spirituel au xive siècle, Etude sur Ubertino de Casale (Louvain, 1911); A. Chiappini, ‘Communitatis responsio ‘Religiosi viri’ ad Rotulum fr. Ubertini de Casali’, AFH 7 (1914), 654-675 & 8 (1915), 56-80; L. Oliger, ‘De Relatione inter Observantium Querimonias Constantienses (1415) et Ubertini Casalensis Quoddam Scriptum’, AFH 9 (1916), 3-41; F. Callaey, `L'influence et la diffusion de l'Arbor vitae de Ubertin de Casale', Revue d'histoire ecclésiastique, 17 (1921), 533-546; P.E. Blondeel d’Isegem, ‘L’influence d’Ubertin de Casale sur les écrits de S. Bernardin de Sienne’, Collectanea Franciscana 5 (1935), 5-44 & 6 (1936), 57-76; M. Zugai, ‘Assumptio B.M. Virginis in Arbor vitae (…)’, Miscellanea Franciscana 46 (11946), 124-156; O. v. Asseldonck, `De invloed van Casale op het geestelijk leven in de Nederlanden', Franciskaans Leven, 30 (1947), 112-114; A. Folgado, `La controversia sobre la pobreza franciscana bajo el pontificado de Juan XXII...', La Ciudad de Dios, 172 (1959), 73-133; R. Manselli, ‘Pietro di Giovanni Olivi ed Ubertino da Casale’, Studi Medievali III, 6 (1965), 95-122; P.B. Guyot, `L'Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Iesu' d'Ubertin de Casale et ses emprunts au `De Articulis Fidei' de S. Thomas d'Aquin', Studies Honoring Ignatius Brady, Friar Minor (New York, 1976), 300-304; M. Thomas, ‘Der Gedanke des Lebensbaumes (Lignum Vitae) in der Generation nach Bonaventura’, in: Bonaventura. Studien zu seiner Wirkungsgeschichte, ed. I. Vanderheyden, Franziskanische Forschungen 28 (Werl, 1976), 157-165; G.L. Potestà, `Un secolo di studi sull' `Arbor Vitae'. Chiesa ed escatologica in Ubertino da Casale', Coll. Franc., 47 (1977), 217-267; K. Ruh, ‘Hubertinus von Casale’, Die deutsche Literatur des Mittelalters. Verfasserlexikon IV2, 211-219 [especially on the vernacular traditions in the German lands and especially in the Low Countries]; Charles Davis, Ubertino da Casale and His Conception of ‘Altissima Paupertas’ (Spoleto: Centro Italiano di Studi sull’Alto Medioevo, 1984); G.L. Potesta, Storia ed escatologia in Ubertino da Casale (Rome, 1980); C. Cenci, AFH 79 (1986), 516 n. 1; M. Damiate, Pietà e storia nell'Arbor vitae di Ubertino da Casale (Florence, 1988); G.L. Potestà, `Ideali di santità secondo Ubertino da Casale ed Angelo Clareno', in: Santi e santità nel secolo XIV. Atti del XV Convegno Internazionale Assisi 15-17 ottobre 1987 (Assisi, 1989), 103-137; B. de Margerie, Histoire doctrinale du culte au coeur de Jésus, I: Premières lumières sur l'amour (Paris, 1992); G.L. Potestà, Ubertin de Casale', DSpir, XVI (1994), 3-15 [with detailed info on works and studies]; J. Adriano de Freitas Carvalho, `Achegas ao estudio da influência da `Arbor vitae' e da `Apocalypsis nova' no século XVI em Portugal', Via Spiritus, 1 (1994), 55-109; Burr, Capitani etc.; Carlos Martínez Ruis, `Ubertino de Casale autor de dos versiones del `Arbor vitae'', AFH 89 (1996), 447-468; Carlos matteo Martínez Ruíz, ‘Il processo redazionale dell’Arbor vitae crucifixae Iesu’ di Ubertino da Casale’, in: Editori di Quaracchi, 275-278; Mistici Francescani Secolo XIV, 589-673 (includes Italian translations of several parts of the Arbor Vitae); Guido Baldassarri, `Letteratura devota, edificante e morale', in: Storia della letteratura italiana, 211-326; M. Damiata, Aspettando l’Apocalisse in fervore e furore con Ubertino da Casale (Rome, 2000); Carlos Mateo Martínez Ruíz, De la dramatizacíon de los acontecimientos de la Pascua a la Cristología. El cuarto libro del Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Iesu de Ubertino de Casale, Studia Antoniana 41 (Rome, 2000) [a.o. reviews in  Collectanea Francescana 70 (2000), 580-584; Analecta T.O.R. 32 (2001), 398-400; Antonianum 75 (2000), 605-607; Carthaginensia 17 (2001), 215-218; Selecc. Franc. 30 (2001), 316-318; Stud. Patav. 48 (2001), 539-541]; Peter Segel, ‘Ubertino da Casale’, LThK3 X, 338f;  Gregory S. Beireich, ‘Franciscan Poverty as a Basis for the Reform of the Church in Ubertino da Casale’s Arbor vitae crucifixae Jesu’, in: Reform and Renewal in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Studies in Honor of Louis Pascoe, S.J., ed. Thomas M. Izbicki & Christopher M. Bellitto, Studies in the History of Christian Thought, 96 (Leiden-Boston-Köln: Brill, 2000), 50-74; Johannes Schlageter, ‘Ubertino von Casale’, Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart, 4th Ed VIII (2005), 683; Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, XI Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) XI/3-4,251-254; Ubertino da Casale nel VII centenario dell'`Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Iesu' (1305-2005). Atti del Convegno di Studi, La Verna 15 settembre 2005, ed. Gabriele Zaccagnini = Studi Francescani 104 (Florence, 2007), 3-183 [With the following essays: Daniele Solvi, ‘La figura storica di Ubertino da Casale. Temi e problemi della storiografia recente’, 13-36; Gabriele Zaccagnini, ‘La spiritualità dell‘Arbor vitae crucifixae Iesu’’, 37-97; Marina Soriani Innocenti, ‘Ubertino da Casale predicatore’, 99-146; Nicoletta Baldini, ‘Riflessi dell‘Arbor vitae’ di Ubertino da Casale nella pittura del Trecento', 147-165 (with 15 additional illustrations)]; Paul Vian, ‘Angelo Clareno e Ubertino da Casale: due itinerari a confronto’, in: Angelo Clareno Francescano. Atti del XXXIV Convegno internazionale. Assisi, 5-7 ottobre 2006, Atti dei Convegni della SISF e del Centro Interuniversitario di Studi Francescani XXIII, n.s. 16 (Spoleto: Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 2007), 167-225; Riccardo Quadri, ‘Un prezioso incunabolo della nostra biblioteca: l‘Arbor vitae’ di Ubertino da Casale’, Fogli 29 (Lugano, 2008), 31-37; Stephen Mossman, ‘Ubertino da Casale and the Devotio moderna’, Ons geestelijk erf 80:3 (2009), 199-280; Stefano Brufani, ‘Ubertino da Casale e le mistiche umbre magistri practici’, in: Santa Chiara da Montefalco monaca agostiniana (1268 - 1308) nel contesto socio-religioso femminile, ed. Enrico Menestò (Spoleto: Centro di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 2009), 143-162; Barbara Piraccini, ‘Sequela, imitatio e conformitas nell’Arbor vitae di Ubertino da Casale’, Franciscana 11 (2009), 95-123; Luis Pérez Simón, ‘Presencia de Ubertino de Casale (1259-1329) en el Primer Abacedario Espiritual de Francisco de Osuna (1492-1541/2)’, Verdad y Vida 67 (2009), 275-308, 549-574; Ana Paula Tavares Magalhães, ‘O Alter Christus: Cristocentrismo e construção da imagem de Francisco na Arbor Vitae Crucifixae Iesu, de Ubertino de Casale (1305)’, Scintilla. Revista de Filosofia e Mística Medieval 7:2 (2010), 87-126; Alberto Cadili, ‘Ubertino da Casale dopo il 1325: un possibile itinerario’, Franciscan Studies 69 (2011), 257-284; Gian Luca Potestà, ‘Ubertino da Casale e la altissima paupertas, tra Giovanni XXII e Ludovico il Bavaro’, Oliviana 4 (2012) [http://oliviana.revues.org/471]; Valerio Gigliotti, La tiara deposta. La rinuncia al papato nella storia del diritto e della chiesa, Biblioteca della Rivista di Storia e Letteratura Religiosa. Studi, 29 (Florence: Leo S. Olschki Editore, 2013). Review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:1-2 (2015), 285-287; Ubertino da Casale: atti del XLI Convegno internazionale: Assisi, 18-20 ottobre 2013, ed. Enrico Menestò, Atti dei Convegni della Società internazionale di studi francescani e del Centro interuniversitario di studi francescani. Nuova Serie, 24 (Spoleto: CISAM, 2014) [This contains the following essays: Marco Bartoli, ‘Ubertino nella storiografia, e oltre’, pp. 3-26; Antonio Montefusco, ‘Autoritratto del dissidente da giovane. Gli anni della formazione di Ubertino nel primo Prologo dell'"Arbor vitae"’, pp. 27-82; Marina Soriani Innocenti, ‘Ubertino da Casale, "fervens praedicator evangelicae veritatis"’, pp. 83-112; Carlos Mateo Martínez Ruiz, ‘Historia y proceso redaccional del "Arbor vitae"’, pp. 113-148; Riccardo Parmeggiano, ‘Ubertino e lo "Spiritus libertatis"’, pp. 149-188; Francesco Verderosa, ‘Ubertino e le fonti francescane’, pp. 189-216; Paolo Vian, ‘"Noster familiaris solicitus et discretus": Napoleone Orsini e Ubertino da Casale’, pp. 217-298; Roberto Lambertini, ‘Ubertino contro la Comunità: argomenti e posta in gioco’, pp. 299-324; Alberto Cadili, ‘L'"enigma" degli ultimi anni di Ubertino da Casale’, pp. 325-402; Sylvain Piron, ‘La réception de l'oeuvre et de la figure d'Ubertin de Casale’, pp. 403-442]; Felice Accrocca, ‘Il punto su Ubertino da Casale. Nota di lettura’, Il Santo. Rivista francescana di storia, dottrina e arte 55 (2015), 317-334; Carlos M. Martínez Ruiz, ‘La figura de María en el ‘Arbor Vite Crucifixe Iesu‘ de Ubertino de Casale ’, Collectanea Franciscana 85:3-4 (2015), 487-522; Alberto Forni & Paolo Vian, ‘Ubertino da Casala, Tedaldo della Casa e Ambrogio Massari da Cori. A proposito di un brano omesso e tagliato nel prologo della ‘Lectura super Apocalipsim’ di Pietro di Giovanni Olivi’, in: La lettera e lo spirito. Studi di cultura e vita religiosa (secc. XII-XV) per Edith Pasztor, ed. Marco Bartoli, Letizia Pellegrini & Daniele Solvi, Biblioteca di frate Francesco, 17 (Milan, 2016), 129-156; Felice Accrocca, 'Pietro di Giovanni Olivi, Ubertino da Casale, Angelo Clareno. Tre leader del movimento degli spirituali', in: Storia della spiritualità francescana, I: secoli XIII-XVI, ed. M. Bartoli, W. Block & A. Mastromatteo (Bologna: Edizione Dehoniane, 2017), 325-346.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ubertino de Tornato

Maybe this is Umberto di Romans O.P.? In any case the work ascribed to Ubertino de Tornato might be Humbert of Romans's sermon collection with the same title.

manuscripts

De Universo Statu Totius Mundi: Prague, Bibl. du Grand Prieuré de l'Ordre des Chevaliers de Malte à Prague R. 148 ff. 97a-102b (18th cent.) [=chapter 35]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ulrich Beffenhuser (fl. later 15th cent.)

OFMConv. Lector in the Breisach convent. Compiled an interesting sermon/praedicabilia collection, in which also several books kept in the convents of Saarburg and Breisach are cited.

manuscripts

Sermones/Praedicabilia: Munich, Staatsbibliothek Clm 26840 ff. 188-221.

Sermones: Munich, Staatsbibliothek Clm 26840 ff. 240ss. [Sermons on Maria and the consecration of churches]

literature

Landmann, Franziskanische Studien 15 (1928), 107

 

 

 

 

 

Ulrich von Gablingen (1722-1800)

OFMCap. Almoner in the German armies of King Charles Emmanuel III of Sardinia. Died on September, 1800 in Augsburg. Prolific author.

editions

Mirabilia Fidei Divinae (1773).

Imago Dei anima rationalis (Venice, 1772).

Vita P. Fr. Richardi a Dertona, Capuccini (Vercelli, 1784).

Psallens inter Coelties Capucinus (Günzburg, 1789).

Vita Aeterna in Morte (1779).

Ostensio Spiritus Et Virtutis in Privato Sermone Et Publica Praedicatione Verbi Divini

All these works can now be accessed via the digital collections of the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek Munich.

literature

DSpir XVI, 25-26; Johannes Madey, ‘Ulrich von Gablingen’, in: Biographisch­Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XVII, 1435-1437.

 

 

 

 

 

Ulricus Horn (Ulrich Horn, fl. late fifteenth cent.)

Friar from Southern Germany, active in Eichstatt c. 1490. Translated into German the rather well-known text De Adhaerendo Deo/De fine religiosae perfectionis (which in Ulrich’s time was attributed to Albertus Magnus, but seems to have been the work of Johann von Kastl) as well as a late fourteenth- or early fifteenth-century Latin Passion treatise, the text of which stands in the main stream of late medieval passion treatises and focusses on the origin of Christ’s sufferings, the way in which his suffering was accomplished, and the benefit of this suffering for mankind. The citations in the text (which amongst other authorities, refers to Marquard von Lindau) and the theological presentation of the passion give a sophisticated impression. Kurt Ruh therefore remarks: ‘Der Traktat als Ganzes bestätigt die theologisch-gelehrten Tendenzen, die die Zitation anzeigt. Die christologischen Aspekte, zumal die Satisfaktionslehre, kommen zur ausführlichen Behandlung. Daneben bleibt das affektiv-erbauliche Element schon durch den oben umschrieben Quellenbestand gewahrt.’ [K. Ruh, ‘Horn, Ulrich’, Die deutsche Literatur des Mittelalters. Verfasserlexiko, 2nd ed. IV, 143.] Our Ulrich should probably not be identified with Ulricus Horn von Pollingen, who wrote in 1444 German History Bible (MS Gotha, Chart. A. 919).

manuscripts

De adhaerendo Deo [in German translation]: MS Nürnberg Germ. Nationalmuseum 18526 ff. 2r-52v [c. 1488/90] Cf. http://www.manuscripta-mediaevalia.de/hs/katalogseiten/HSK0058_b076_JPG.htm

Betrachtung des Leidens Christi: MS Nürnberg Germ. Nationalmuseum 18526 ff. 52v-152r [according to a remark in the text, this translation dates from 1484]

literature

L. Kurras, Die Handschriften des Germ. Nationalmuseums Nürnberg. I. Band, 1. Teil (Nürnberg, 1974), 76f; K. Ruh, ‘Horn, Ulrich’, Die deutsche Literatur des Mittelalters. Verfasserlexikon, 2nd ed. IV, 141-143

 

 

 

 

Ulrich Macker (Ulricus Macherus/Ulrich de Delémont, 1724-1804)

OFMCap.

literature

Christian Schweizer, ‘Macker [Macher], Ulrich de Delémont, cap. (1724-1804)’, Historisches Lexikon der Schweiz 8 (2009), 190.

 

 

 

 

Ulrich Weiss (Ulrich Weiß, d. 1763)

Observant friar.

literature

Ulrich G. Leinsle, ‘Weiss, Ulrich (auch Weis, Weiß)’, Biographisches-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XIII, 682-684.

 

 

 

 

Urbanus de Fossa (Urbano Dalla Fosse/Bolziano, c. 1442-c. 1514)

Humanist friar and author of the first Greek grammar published in Italy. Buried in the S. Niccolò friary. See the lemma on Urbanus Valerianus de Belluno below, as it is the same person.

 

 

 

 

Urbanus de Manfredonia (d. 1578)

OFMCap

literature

Luigi Cianilli, Sette stelle di prima grandezza nel Convento dei Cappuccini di Serracapriola (Foggia: Ed. Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, 2005).

 

 

 

 

Urbanus Valerianus de Belluno (Urbanus Bolzanius/Urbano dalle Fosse/Urbano Veleriani, c. 1443-1524)

OMConv. Son of the Belluno blacksmith (Belluno, near the Dolomites). Joined the Conventuals and studied in Treviso and Venice. There is some confusion about his name (Urbano delle Fosse, Bolzanius, Valeriani etc., and see for this the remarks in the Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 32 (1986): 'il nome Bolzanio, adottato dal celebre nipote Pierio Valeriano - Giovanni Pietro Dalle Fosse - e presente nelle edizioni della grammatica del D. a partire da quella apparsa a Venezia nel 1545, rimase ai discendenti come un vero cognome, prevalendo di fatto su quello autentico. Del tutto fantasioso invece il nome Valeriano, che il nipote Pierio attribuì a sé stesso e allo zio, nel tentativo di nobilitare la sua famiglia di origine artigiana.' Among his teacher was the humanist Rolandello. Became attached to the corn-merchant and future doge of Venice, Andrea Gritti.

Urbano was novice of the Conventual S. Pietro di Belluno friary in Spring 1450, where he also obtained his initial education in the arts and theology (at least until 1465. In 1466, he is found at Treviso, possibly for his theology studies. Seven years later, in 1472, he can be found in the S. Niccolò friary of Venice. Between 1473 and 1484 he embarked on a first series of extended travels. During this period, Urbano travelled extensively through Greece, Asia Minor, Egypt, and the Aegaeian. He left an itinerary of this, which now is lost. Parts of this eventually were included in De litterarum infelicitate and the Antiquitates Bellinenses of his nephew Pierio. On the way back from his travels, Urbano studied in Messina (Sicily) at the Greek academy of Costantino Lascaris (in the Basilian convent of San Salvatore) and investigated the vulcanic activity of the Etna. Between 1484 and 1489, Urbano tutored Giovanni de’ Medici (future Pope leo X) in Florence. He settled in Venice in 1489/1490 and opened a private school for the study of Greek and humanist studies. Became involved with the humanist printing activities of Aldo Manutius and Manutius printed Urbano’s Institutiones Graecae Grammatices in 1497 or February 1498. It was one of the first Greek grammars geared to the needs of Latin readers. Had no less than three different editions (all of which controled by Urbano, although the final one appeared posthumously) and in total at least 23 imprints. Although this was a significant editorial success, it is clear that the grammar of Theodor Gaza (Gazae Introductivae grammatices libri quattuor) had an even larger success during the first half of the sixteenth century, also thanks to its translation by Erasmus and its raccommendation by Vives in volume III of his De tradendis disciplinis. In May 1503, Urbano left Venice to travel in the company of his protector Andra Gritti to Constantinople/Istanbul, where the latter was to become embassador, and where Urbano hoped to find classiscal works and Greek and Latin inscriptions. But by June 1504, both Gritti and Urbano were back in Italy. Urbano came back to Italy and helped helped Erasmus to prepare the Venetian edition of his Adagia in 1508. Still in Venice, Urbano prepared the second edition of his Greek grammar in 1512. Shortly therafter, Urbano visited Assisi, Florence and Rome, where he possibly visited his former pupil, now elected Pope, Leo X. Back in Venice, Urbano continued to teach Greek, and he continued to engage in smaller excursions, also to gather botanic materials alongside of antiquary materials for his own garden in Venice. In 1523, he prepared the third edition of his grammar, but he was unable to finish it. The finalization was left in the hands of his disciples Daniele Renier and Giovanni da Trino, and it was eventually issued in 1545, with the help of Tommaso Miliaro di Belluno and Pierio Valeriano. Urbino himself died at the end of April 1524. The funeral oration in the S. Niccolò convent was held by Alberto da Castelfranco, with the assistence of other pupils of Urbano. Urbano left his library to the same St. Niccolò monastery in Venice. Nothing is known of its actual whereabouts.

manuscripts

Biblioteca del Museo civico di Belluno, MS 430 (III 13) [cfr. Doglioni, Memorie, 43 & P.O. Kristeller, Iter Italicum II, 494]. This manuscript, once in the possession of the Bishop of Belluno, Luigi Lollini (1596-1625), contains the Fables of Aesopus (ff. 1-39), the letters of Pseudo Falarides (ff. 41-116), the pseudo-Soctrases oration ad Demonicum (ff. 97-107), and the oration of Isocrates ad Nicoclem (ff. 116-125). These texts sere furnished by Urbino with a Latin translation, and the functioned as school texts in Humanist schools.

editions

Institutiones Graecae Grammatices (Venice: Aldo Manutius, February 1498/Paris: in aedibus Aegidii Gourmontii, ca. 1514).

Institutiones Graecae Grammatices, 2nd Ed., 2 Vols. (Venice, sumptu et diligentia Ioannis de Tridino alias Tacuini, 1512/Basel: apud Valentinum Curionem, 1524/1530/Basel: ex. officina Ioannis Walder, 1535/Venice: apud Melchiorrem Sessam, 1537/ Basel: in off. Ioannis Walder 1539/Paris: Christiphorus Wechelius, 1543/Basel: Hierronymus Curiones, 1544/Venice: per Ioannem Antonium et Petrum fratres de Nicolinis Sabionenses, sumptu M. Sessae, 1544/Basel: ex off. Hieronymi Curionis, impensis Henrici Petri, 1548/Basel: ap. Hieronymum Curionem, 1554/ Basel: per Henricum Petrum, 1561).

Institutiones Graecae Grammatices, 3rd ed., 9 Vols. (Venice: apud haeredes Petri Rabani et socios, 1545/Venice: apud Petrum et Ioannem Mariam et nepotes de Nicolinis de Sabio, ad instantiam, 1549/ Venetiis, apud haeredes Petri Ravani et socios, 1550/1553/Venice: apud F. Rampazettum, 1557/Venice: apud Paulum Manutium, Aldi f., 1559/1560/1566). This third edition more or less reprints the second edition.

>>

literature

Alberti Castrifrancani Oratio habita in funere Urbani Bellunensis (Venice: per Bernardinuin Benalium, 1524); L. Doglioni, Memorie di U. Bolzanio Bellunese dell'Ordine dei minori conventuali (Belluno 1784/ Belluno, 1884); G. Bustico, ‘Due umanisti veneti – Urbano Bolzanio e Piero Valeriani’, Civiltà moderna 4 (1932), 86-103; M.E. Cosenza, Biographical and bibliogr., Dictionary of the Italian Humanists, IV (Boston, 1972), 3541 s. (U. Valerianus); A. Pertusi, ‘Erotémata. Per la storia e le fonti delle prime grammatiche greche a stampa‘, Italia med. e uman. 5 (1962), 327, 343 ff., 349 f.; Ole Langwitz Smith, 'Urbano da Belluno, and Copenhagen GKS 1965, 4°', Scriptorium 32 (1978), 57-59; A. Pertusi, ‘L'umanesimo greco dalla fine del sec. XIV agli inizi del sec. XVI‘, in: Storia della cultura veneta, III: Dal Primo Quattrocento al concilio di Trento, ed/ G. Arnaldi & M. Pastore Stocchi (Vicenza, 1980), 242f.; M.J.C. Lowry, ‘Urbano Valeriani’, in: Contemporaries of Erasmus. A Biographical Register III, 370-371; Lucia Gualdo Rosa, 'Dalle Fosse, Urbano', Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani XXXII (1986).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valentinus Kisel (fl. later seventeenth cent.)

OFM. German friar and Scotist theologian.

editions

Homo microcosmus (Amberg, 1675).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valentinus Mareus (Valentin Marée, d. 1669)

OFMRec. Belgian friar. Novice master. Author of the Traicté des conformités du disciple avec son maistre, c’est-à-dire de S. François avec Jésus-Christ en tous les mystères de sa naissance, vie, passion, mort, etc. 3 Vols (Liège, 1656-1660). The work is inspired by De Conformitate of Bartholomaeus of Pisa.

literature

DSpir X, 327.

 

 

 

 

Valerianus Berna (Valeriano Berna/da Pinerolo, d. 1617)

OFMCap. Born in Pinerolo (Piemont). Entered the order in the Genoa province. Promotor of Capuchin expansion into the German lands. Provincial definitor and provincial minister of the Genoa province. Died at Genoa, in the Immaculate Conception convent. Wrote several volumes of sermons and a history of the Capuchin expansion.

manuscripts

Sermoni >>>

Historia de Origine Institutione et Progressu Missionis Capuccinorum in Subalpinis:>>

literature

Bernardo di Bologna, Bibliotheca Scriptorum Ordinis Minorum Capuccinorum (Venice, 1747), 245; X. Molfino, Cappuccini liguri, scrittori ed artisti (Genoa, 1909), 13; I cappuccini Genovesi (Genoa, 1912) I, 87.

 

 

 

 

Valerianus Gutowski (Walerian Gutowski/Gutovski, 1629-1693)

OFMConv. Theologian (he apparently obtained a doctorate in theology), preacher and provincial minister. Together with Anton Rokoszowic, he was responsible for the reconstruction of the Franciscan church of Cracow (Krakau), which had burned down on 25 September 1655 during the Swedish invasion of Poland. In 1669, he preached at the occasion of the crowning festivities of the Polish King Michael Wisniowiecki. Walerian's most famous work is his Hartowna strzala nieuchronnym lubo smiertelnosci iadem napusczona (1661).

editions

Hartowna strzala nieuchronnym lubo smiertelnosci iadem napuszczona do zamierzonego iednak celu wiekuistey niesmiertelnosci bez szwanku godzaca (Cracow: Franciszka Cezarego J.K.M. Typogr., 1661).

Panegiryczne niektóre Dyskvrsy dvchowne y rózne insze kazania, przy celnieyszym y obfitszym Audytorze, w kosciolach zwlaszczá Krákowskich pewnych czásow miáne (Cracow: Krzysztofa Schedla J.K.M. Typogr. roku Palskiego, 1675).

Quadrajezymal caly. Albo Kazania w polskim lezykv na ewangelie kazdodzienne, zvpelnego Postv Swietego (...), od Przewielebnego Oycá Waleryana Gvtowskiego Fránciszkáná, Náuk Wyzwolonych y Pismá S. Doktora, Prowincyey Polskiey Oyca (Cracow: Mikoaia Alexandra Schedla J.K.M. Ordynáreynego Typographá, 1688).

Wielki Franciszek Swilty w malvckozci swoiey, ná kázaniu przy obecnoi Naiasnieyszego Michaa nowo koronowánego Páná y Monárchy polskiego (Cracow: Krzysztofa Schedlá J.K.M. typ., 1669).

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 557-560; Slownik polskich pisarzy franciszkalskich / Lexikon der polnischen Franziskaner-Schriftsteller (Warshaw, 1981), 168-169; T. Zielinski, ‘O perswazii w kazaniach siedemnastowiecznego franciszkanina Waleriana Gutowskiego’, in: Teatr wymowy. Formy I przemiany retoryki uzytkowej (Bialystok, 2004), 121-128. On the art of persuasion and rhetorics in the sermons of Valerianus Gutowski; Wieslaw Pawlak, ‘Praedicator urbanus – Walerian Gutowski OFMConv.’, in: Wielcy kaznodzieje Krakowa. Studia in honorem prof. Eduardi Staniek, ed. Kazimierza Panusia (Cracow: Wydawnictwo UNUM, 2006), 191-226.

 

 

 

Valerian Magni (Valerian Magni/Walerian Magni/Valeriano/‘the long monk', 1586-1661)

OFMCap. Born in Milan on 11 October 1586 but raised in Prague as son of an immigrant Italian family (his father Constantino Magni had moved there early in Valerian's life. Valerian's mother was Ottavia Carcassola). Valerian joined the Capuchins in March 1602, much to the displeasure of his family. After his ordination and studies, he became lector for philosophy and theology for his order in Prague and Vienna. From this lectorate period stems the first version of his Synopsis doctrinae Aristotelis. Became active in diplomatical political missions within the Austrian lands for Polish and Austrian governments, and for the papal see, also in the context of the recatholization of Bohemia. During his various teaching assignments, Valerian became very interested in new developments in natural philosophy and in questions on scientific method, which enticed him to develop e philosophical system of his own, relatively independent from Aristotelianism. He performed vacuum experiments in the presence of the King and Queen of Poland in July 1647, inspired by Galileo's Discorsi i dimonstrazioni matematiche. The same year, Valerian published a study on the vacuum, entitled Demonstratio ocularis sine locato, corporis successive moti in vacuo, luminis nulli corpori inhaerentis a Valeriano Magno exhibita Serenissimis Principibus Vladislao IV. et Ludivicae Mariae Reginae Ploniae et Sveciae (Cracow, 1647). Later, people said he had plagiarized Torricelli yet Valerian maintained that he had come to his observations and conclusions independently. His reflections on philosophical method and scientific questions, which also touched on Descartes, and which also are reflected in his Principia et Specimen Philosophiae and, interestingly enough, also in his rethinking of Bonaventurean illuminism (see his De luce mentium et ejus imagine from 1642/6) set him somewhat apart from order members and also brought him into serious conflict with the Jesuits. They fought first over Valerian's scientific approach, which tried to come to terms with Cartesianism and new scientific insights, and later over the conversion of Count Ernst of Hesse (1652), in which Valerian played an important part. [Cf. Pascal, Provinciales XV]. Valerian spent some time in prison and died in Salzburg, when he was on its way to Rome to find support for his case. Valerian has left an interesting philosophical and theological corpus, which is relatively independent with regard to the dominant intellectual currents of his day. Forayed wide into Augustine, Bonaventure, Aristotle, Averoes, various Renaissance Platonists, Galileo, Mersenne and Descartes. 

editions

Valeriani Magni Mediolanensis F. Ordinis Minorum Seraphici P. Francisci Nuncupatorum Capuccinnorum De Acatholicorum credendi regula. Judicium Immaculatæ Mariæ Virgini ex voto Sacrum (Prague: Paulus Sessius, 1628). Available via Google Books.

Synopsis doctrinae Aristotelis. De libri II, in quorum prima totius fere doctrinae Aristotelis traditur synopsys, in altero vero auctoris de hac doctrina profertur sententia (Vienna, 1643).

De humani arbitrii libertate, ed. Jiri Benes & Stanislav Sousedík, in: Acta Universitatis Carolinae. Historia Universitatis Carolinae Pragensis 19 (Prague, 1979), 71-88.

De luce mentium et eius imagine (Rome: Franciscus Caballus, 1642/Vienna, 1646/Bologna, 1886). The 1642 edition is available in digital format via the Bayerische Staatsbibliothek and via Google Books.

Demonstratio ocularis sine locato, corporis successive moti in vacuo, luminis nulli corpori inhaerentis a Valeriano Magno exhibita Serenissimis Principibus Vladislao IV. et Ludivicae Mariae Reginae Ploniae et Sveciae (Cracow: Benacci, 1647/1648). Several editions available via Google Books

Opus philosophicum (Lithomisslij [Leitomischl]: Joannis Arnolti, 1660).

Principia et specimen Philosophiae (Cologne, 1652). Several editions available via Google Books.

Admiranda de Vacuo, scilicet, Valeriani Magni Demonstratio (Warshaw: Petrus Elert, 1647), also edited in: Monumenta Guerickiana 3 (1996), 61-72 & Monumenta Guerickiana 9-10 (2002), 101-122.

Valerii Magni Fratris Capuccini Tractatus De Syllogismo Demonstrativo

Experimenta de Incorruptibilitate Aquæ (1648).

Apologia contra imposturas Jesuitarum: cui accessere eiusdem Epistolae IV (1661). Available via Google Books.

For more information about his works, see in particular the various works of Cygan, and the 1982 work of Sousedik.

literature

Nicolaus de Lucca & Ludovicus de Salice, Leben und Taten des P. Valerian Magni OFM CAP., Provinzials und Apostolischen Missionars der Böhmisch-Österreichischen Provinz des Ordens der Minderbrüder Kapuziner: geb. 15.10.1586 in Mailand, gest. 29.7.1661 in Salzburg, trans. P. Egino Kraus (Würzburg, 1976); German Abgottspon, P. Valerianus Magni Kapuziner (1586-1661). Sein Leben im allgemeinen, seine apostolische Tätigkeit in Böhmen im besonderen. Ein Beiträg zur Geschichte der katholischen Restauration im 17. Jahrhundert (Olten-Freiburg i.B.: Walter, 1939); Mario da Guspini, ‘La conoscenza di Dio in Valeriano Magni: possibilità di una conoscenza intuitiva?’, Collectanea Francescana 30 (1960), 264-297; Marianus a Sobienie, ‘Cosmologia Valeriani Magni, OFMCap (1586-1661)’, Collectanea Francescana 31 (1961), 609-636; Georgyus/Jerzy Cygan, ‘Das Verhältnis Valerian Magnis zu Galileo Galilei und seinen wissenschaftlichen Ansichten’, Collectanea Franciscana 38 (1968), 135-166; Kreszens Braun, Die Philosophie des Varelian Magni OFM Cap (1586-1661) und die Bonaventura-Tradition des Kapuzinerordens im 17. Jahrhundert, Beilage Familien-Nachrichten, 52 (Koblenz-Ehrenbreitstein: Rheinisch-Westfälische Kapuzinerprovinz, 1970); Georgyus Cygan, ‘Opera Valeriani Magni velut manuscripta tradita aut typis impressa’, Collectanea Franciscana 42 (1972), 119-178, 309-352; Georgyus Cygan, ‘Vita prima Valeriana Magni a Nicolao de Lucca et Ludovico de Salce descripta’, Collectanea Franciscana 45 (1975), 213-249; Cesare Vasoli, ‘Note sulle idee filosofiche di Valeriano Magni’, in Italia, Venezia e Polonia tra medio evo e età moderna (Florence: Olschki, 1980), 79-112; Georgyus Cygan, ‘Valeriani Magni und die Frage der Verständigung mit der orthodoxen Kirche’, Collectanea Franciscana 51 (1981), 333-368; Stanislav Sousedík, Valerian Magni 1586-1661. Versuch einer Erneurung der christlichen Philosophie im 17. Jahrhundert (Sankt Augustin: Richarz, 1982); Camille Bérubé, ‘Valérien Magni, héritier de Bonaventure, Henri de Gand et Jean Scot Erigène ou précurseur de E. Kant’, Cuadernos salmantinos de filosofía 11 (1984), 129-157; Georgyus/Jerzy Cygan, Valerianus Magni (1586-1661). ‘Vita prima’, operum recensio et bibliographia (Rome: Istituto storico degli cappuccini, 1989); Georgyus Cygan, ‘Valeriani Magni propositum ad ordinem capuccinorum reformandum’, Collectanea Franciscana 58 (1988), 45-59; C.M. Jerzy, ‘Walerian Magni OFMCap a ‘Colloquium caritativum w 1645 r.w. Toruniu’, Studia Franziskanskie 7 (1996), 241-254; Stanislav Sousedík, Filosofie v ceských zemích (Prague, 1997); Paul Richard Blum, Philosophen philosophie und Schulphilosophie. Typen des philosophierens in der Neuzeit (Stuttgart, Franz Steiner Verlag, 1998), 102-116 (‘Philosophie als Programm: Valerian Magni’); Jerzy Cygan, ‘Theologische Themen im Dialog von Johann Amos Comenius und Valerianus Magni’, in: Comenius als Theologe. Beiträge zur Internationalen wissenschaftlichen Konferenz ‘Comenius’ Erbe und die Erziehung des Menschen für das 21. Jahrhundert’ [Sektion VII] anläßlich des 400. Geburtstag von Jan Amos Comenius, ed. Vladimir J. Dvorak & Jan B. Lasek, Pontes Pragenses, band 1 (prague: Nadace Comenius, 1998),  184-203; Blanka Karlsson, ‘Die Finsponger Sammlungen in Norrköping’, in: Comenius als Theologe. Beiträge zur Internationalen wissenschaftlichen Konferenz ‘Comenius’ Erbe und die Erziehung des Menschen für das 21. Jahrhundert’ [Sektion VII] anläßlich des 400. Geburtstag von Jan Amos Comenius, ed. Vladimir J. Dvorak & Jan B. Lasek, Pontes Pragenses, band 1 (prague: Nadace Comenius, 1998), 244-262; Slawomir Koscielniak, ‘Walerian Magni, laucyn, uczony i diplomata, I jego zwiacki z Gdanskiem’, in: Jacuba w Gdansku: zarys historyczny, ed. Adam Szarswewski (Handlowa Mado, 1999), 260-280; Jerzy Cygan, ‘Walerian Magni (1586-1661): nowozytny filozof, ekumenista, rzecznik egzystencjalnej apologetyki I odnowy moralney’, in: Z problematiki pedagogiki porównawczej, ed. Wiktor Rabczuk (Warchaw: Instytut Badán Edukacyjnych, 1998), 179-192 [On Valerianus as a existential and moral philosopher]; Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XV, 911-915; Jerzy Cygan, ‘Der Streit Jan Brozeks, Professor der Krakauer Akademie, mit Valerian Magni, Kapuziner, zu der Möglichkeit des Daseins der Leere in der Natur’, Monumenta Guerickiana 9-10 (2002), 92-100; H. Louthan, ‘Mediating Confessions in Central Europe: The Ecumenical Activity of Valerian Magni, 1586-1661’, The Journal of Ecclesiastical History 55 (2004), 681-699; V. Criscuolo, ‘Tre diplomatici al ‘Kurfürstentag’ di Regensburg 1636-1637: Valeriano Magni, Francesco Rozdrazweski e Diego de Quiroga’, Laurentianum 45 (2004), 59-107; Hans Joachim Müller, ‘Comenius’ Modell der Urteilsfindung in der Kontroverse mit dem Kapuzinermönch Valerian Magni’, in: Johann Amos Comenius – Vordenker eines kreativen Friendens, ed. Erwin Schadel, Schriften zur Traditik und Ontodynamik, 24 (Frankfurt a.M.: Peter Lang, 2005), 189-209; Jerzy Cygan, ‘Magni (Magno, magnus, de Magnis) Maksymilian [Walerian]’, Powszechna Encyklopedia Filozofii VI, 686-689; Alessandro Catalano, ‘La politica della curia romana in Boemia: dalla strategia del nunzio Carlo Carafa a quella del cappuccino Valeriano Magni’, in: Kaiserhof – Papsthof (16.-18. Jahrhundert), ed. Richard Bösel et al., Publikationen des Historischen Instituts beim Österreichischen Kulturforum in Rom, Abhandlungen, 12 (Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2006), 105-121; Jan Bernd Elpert, ‘Kein Bruder soll sich anmassen, ein eigentliches Studium zu verfolgen. Die Kapuziner und die Philosophie – ein Streifzug durch die intellektuelle, philosophische Entwicklung des Kapuzinerordens im 16. und frühen 17. Jahrhunderts’, in: Sol et homo. Mensch und Natur in der Renaissance. Festschrift zum 70. Geburtstag für Eckhard Keßler, 378-386; Jerzy Marian Cygan, ‘Magni Valeriano OFMCap’, Encyklopedia Katolicka XI, 806f; Alfredo Di Napoli, L’azione politica e missionaria di Valeriano Magni e le linee direttive della Curia romana in Boemia attraverso la corrispondenza della Congregazione de Propaganda Fide (1626-1651), PhD. Diss. (Rome: Gregorianum, 2009); Massimo Bucciantini, ‘La discussione sul vuoto in Italia: il caso di Valeriano Magni’, in: Discussioni sul nulla tra Medioevo et Età Moderna (Florence: Olschki, 2009), 285-301; Alfredo Di Napoli, Valeriano Magni da Milano e la riforma ecclesiastica in Boemia attraverso la corrispondenza della Congregazione de Propaganda Fide (1626-1651), Centro Studi Cappuccini Lombardi, nuova serie, 2 (Milan: Edizioni Biblioteca Francescana, 2015) [Cf. review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:3-4 (2015), 784-787.

 

 

 

 

Valerius Bonus (Valerio Bona da Bressa, c. 1560–c. 1620)

Italian Conventual Franciscan and composer of the early Baroque. Possibly a student of Costanzo Porta and active as chapel master in Milan and Verona. Known for works on musical composition, such as Regole del contraponto and Essempi delli passaggi delle consonanze, et dissonanze, and for a series of masses, canzonas and related works.

For more biographical information, see Franco C. Ricci, 'Bona, Valerio', Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 11 (1969), now accessible via: http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/valerio-bona_%28Dizionario_Biografico%29/

editions

Regole del contraponto et compositione brevemente raccolte da diversi auttori (Casale: Appresso Bernardo Grasso, 1595). A German translation with a commentary of the work was made as a Ph.D. thesis by F. Reusch (Heidelberg, 1924). A digital version of the work can be found at: http://tmiweb.science.uu.nl/text/reading-edition/bonreg.html

Essempi delli passaggi delle consonanze, et dissonanze, et d'altre cose pertinenti al Compositore (Milan: Appresso li heredi di Francesco et Simon Tini, 1596). An extension of the previous work.

Litaniae et aliae Laudes B. M. Virginis, nec non divorum Francisci et Antonii patavini quator vocibus concinendae (Milan: Francesco Trin et eredi di Simon Tini, 1591).

Missa, et sacrae cantiones quae vulgo Motecta nuncupantur octonis vocibus concinendae (Milan: M. Trino, 1591).

Il secondo libro delle Canzonette a tre voci, con l'aggionta di dodeci Terchtti a note (Venice: R. Amadino, 1592).

Missa et Motecta ternis vocibus... quibus in fine accesserunt Magnificat sexti toni à 6 et Falsi Bordoni à 3 omnitonum (Milan: Eredi di Francesco e Simone Trini, 1594).

Il quarto libro delle Canzonette a tre voci (Milan: Erede di Simone Trini e Francesco Besozzi, 1599).

Psalmi omnes ad vesperum quatuor vocibus (Venice: R. Amadino, 1600).

Motectorum senis vocibus. Liber primus (Venice: R. Amadino, 1600).

Missarum et Motectorum duobus choris. Liber secundus (Venice: R. Amadino, 1600).

Madrigali, et Canzoni a cinque voci. Libro primo (Venice: A. Gardano, 1601).

Li dilettevoli Introiti della Messa a doi chori brevi, facili, & ariosi con il partito delli Bassi modernamente composti, per cantare, & sonare in concerto (Venice: G. Vincenti, 1611).

Messa e Vespro a quatro chori, con il partito delli bassi ridotti in un solo basso generale, & doi continuati, per il primo, & secondo, terzo, & quarto choro, op. 19 (Venice: G. Vincenti, 1611).

Sei Canzoni italiane da sonare concertate a doi chori in Echo, op. 21 (Venice: G. Vincenti, 1614).

Lamentazioni della Settimana Santa, op. 22 (Venice: G. Vincenti, 1616).

Otto ordini di Letanie della Madonna che si cantano ogni sabato nella Santa Casa di Loreto, concertate à doi chori per sonare et cantare (Venice: G. Vincenti, 1619).

literature

Giovanni da S. Antonio, Bibliotheca universa franciscana (Madrid, 1733) III, 134-135; A. Tessier, 'Del p. Valerio Bona o Buona e delle sue opere', Miscellanea francescana 5:2 (1890), 52-54; D. Sparacio, 'Musicisti minori conventuali', Miscellanea francescana 25:1 (1925), 21f; Franco C. Ricci, 'Bona, Valerio', Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 11 (1969) [with additional biographical information!]; Josef-Horst Lederer, 'Bona, Valerio', in: Grove Music Online. Oxford Music Online (Oxford University Press): http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com/ [Accessed 25 November 2015]; Barocco padano e musici francescani: L’apporto dei maestri conventuali. Atti del XVI Convegno internazionale sul barocco padano (secoli XVII-XVIII), Padova 1-3 luglio 2013, ed. Alberto Colzani, Andrea Luppi & Maurizio Padoan, Barocco Padano, 8/Centro Studi Antoniani, 55 (Padua: Associazione Centro Studi Antoniani, 2014). Review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:1-2 (2015), 352-354.

 

  

 

 

  

 

Valerius de Venetia (Valerio da Venezia/Valerio Ballardini, d. 1618)

OFMCap. Published several spiritual works for a wider public.

editions

Prato fiorito di varii essempi, diviso in cinque libri (Venice, 1605)

Prato fiorito Parte Seconda divisa in sei libri (Venice, 1610)

Brevi e divoti meditationi intorno ai principali misteri della vita di Giesù Cristo e meditatione de giudicio universale (Venice, 1610)

Romitorio sacro. Meditazioni et essercitii di contemplazioni ed amorose aspirazioni in Dio (…) (Venice, 1610)

Vita della gloriosa santa Chiara vergine di Assisi composta da S. Bonaventura Cardinale e d’altri autori con le vite delle beate monache delle sua sancta regola e di quelle ancora de terzo ordine (…) (Venice, 1610) [contains biographies of c. 70 other Franciscan female saints. It was translated into German as: Sanctuarium Monacharum. Der Klosterfrauen Heiliggthumb (…) (Munich, 1623)]

literature

Miscellanea Francescana IV (1889), 22ff; G. Crisostomo da Cittadella, Biblioteca dei Frati Minori Cappuccini della provincia di Venezia (Padua, 1944), 267-278; Lexicon Capuccinum (Rome, 1951), 1778; Collectanea Franciscana 58 (1988), 5-44; DSpir XVI, 164-165; Guido Dedrojetta, ‘Fuggire i vizi per perseguir virtú. I racconti moralizzanti del ‘Prato fiorito’ e il miracolo delle noci’, Messaggero Cap 46 (Bologna, marzo-aprile, 2002), 13-15.

 

 

 

 

 

Valerius Polidori (Valerio Polidoro da Padova, fl. late 16th cent.

OFMConv. Theologian and professional exorcist (a former pupil of Cesare Lanza, the Franciscan who in 1580 was condemned for his necromantic practices). Polidoro was first and foremost known for his Practica exorcistarum.

editions

Practica exorcistarum F. Valerii Polidori Patavini, Conventualis Francisc. Artium, & Sacrae Theologiae Doctoris, ad Daemones, et Maleficia de Christifidelibus expellendum (Padua: Apud Paulum Meietum, 1585). Accessible via Google Books.

Dispersio daemonum quae secunda pars est practice exorcistarum (Padua: Apud Paulum Meietum, 1587).

Religiose memorie della Chiesa del Santo, cioè nostro gran Templo di Padova (Venice: Paolo Meietto, 1590).

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 560-561; Giovanni Romeo, Inquisitori, esorcisti e streghe nell’Italia della Controriforma (Florence: Sansoni Editore, 1990), 153 [On the connection between Polidoro and Lanza].

 

 

 

 

 

Varona de Valdivielso (Varrona/Baraona, d. after 1609)

Born in Madrid. Studied theology and Bible Studies at Salamanca and Alcalá de Henares. Entered the Franciscan order in 1575 in Toledo (San Jean de los Reyes) in the Castilian province. Taught moral theology and biblical exegesis. Renowned preacher. Later found in la Salceda (where his brother was guardian) and as guardian in Oropesa.

Editions/manuscripts

De Arcano Verbo Sive de Vivo, Omniumque Factivo Sermone Dei: Atque de Concionatoribus Eiusdem, ad Sacri Textus Intelligentiam (Madrid, 1595/Salamanca, 1606) [treatise built around Hebr. 4, 12: vivus est sermo Dei]

In Psalmum Octuagesimum Sextum Literalis, Mystica, et Moralis Interpretatio Necnon Beatae Virginis Eiusque Immaculato Conceptui Adaptata, Atque per Dialogi Modum Digesta (Salamanca, 1590/Madrid, 1593/Toledo, 1593/Salamanca, 1596) [a fictive dialogue with a parish priest on the church, sainthood, saints, Christ, apostles, the Bible itself, etc.]

Tractado sobre el Ave Maria (Salamanca, 1584/Madrid, 1593/Salamanca, 1596)

Floretus Morum Sacrae Scripturae: MS Madrid Conv. Premonstratensiae C. 29

several smaller exegetical and mariological works

literature

Mariano Acebal Lujan, `Varona de Valdivielso', Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 290-291.

 

 

 

 

 

Venantius A. Tyszkowski

literature

Filip Wolanski, ‘Reminescencje konfliktow miedzynarodowych w kazaniach franciszkanskich epoki saskiej’, in: Polska wobec wielkich konfliktow w Europie nowozytnej, ed. Ryszarda Skowrona (Cracow: Societas Vistulana, 2009), 125-129.

 

 

 

 

 

Venantius de Carcassonne (Venance Dougados, d. 1794)

OFMCap. Left the order>>>>

editions

La quête du blé ou Voyage d’un capucin dans les différentes parties des diocèses de Vabres, Castres et Saint-Pons, en prose et en verse, ed. Rémy Cazals, Collection textes littéraires 101 (University of Exeter Press, 1997).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Venantius de Fabriano (Venanzio da Fabriano, 1434-1506)

OFMObs.

literature

T. Somigli, `Vita di S. Giac. della Marca scritta da fra Venanzio da Fabriano OMObs', AFH, 17 (1924), 378-414 (403ff.) ; M. Sgattoni, La vita di S. Giac. della Marca (...) per fra Venanzio da Fabriano (1434-1506) (Zara, 1940); Emore Paoli, ‘Venanzio da Fabriano e la costruzione della memoria agiografica di Giacomo della Marca (…)’, in: Biografia e agiografia di san Giacomo della Marca. Atti del III Convegno internazionale di Studi (Monteprandone, 29 novembre 2008), ed. Fulvia Serpico, Quaderni di san Giacomo, 2 (Florence: SISMEL –Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2009), 125-152; E. Paoli, ‘Venanzio da Fabriano e la costruzione della memoria agiografica di Giacomo della Marca: una questione preliminare’, Franciscana 14 (2012), 151-186.

 

 

 

 

Venantius Kindlinger (Nikolaus Kindlinger, Bruder Venantius, 1749-1819)

OFM. German friar from Neudorf (Martinshal), who left the order; archivist and histiorian. Born on February 17, 1749. Studied liberal arts at the Jesuite college of Mainz, to enter the Franciscans in 1766. In acknowledgment of his historical interestes, he was given time to pursue his studies in this area, notably the institutional history of Germany, with recourse to solid archival work. In 1787, he was given permission to leave the order. Thereafter, he made his living as an archivist and historian for various noble families, the Cologne electorate, and the cathedral chapters of Muenster and Paderborn, until he became financially independent, due to an inheritance (1802). Between 1806 and 1816, he worked as the archivist of prince William of Orange at Fulda. He died at Mainz after an accident on 15 September 1819. Throughout his life, Kindlinger spent a lot of time and effort in copying archival collections, building himself therewith a document collection of more than 200 volumes, now kept in the State archives of Münster and Marburg. As many of the original documents on which his transcripts were based subsequently were lost in the Neapoleontic wars and later conflicts, Kindlinger’s source collection has become an indispensable instrument to gain access to the institutional history of Westphalen. On top of that, he also wrote more than 10 volumes of history on Germany and Westphalen. Whereas these books have not withstood the tooth of time, Kindlinger is generally considered as a landmark figure in the emergence of the modern archivist.

literature

Neue Deutsche Biographie XI, 620-621; W. Gockaln, ‘J.N. Kindlinger, Sämmler, Archivar und Historiograph in der Nachfolge Justus Mösers’, Westfälische Zeitschrift 120 (1970), 11-201, 121 (1971), 37-40; 

 

 

 

Véran de Cavaillon (1582-1638)

OFMCap. Already priest when he took the habit in 1607 in Avignon. Master of the novices in 1615 (Carpentras) and in 1618 (Avignon). Guardian in Isle-sur-Sorgue in 1616 and in Sisteron in 1619. Once again guardian of Sisteron in 1625. Provincial secretary in Avignon in 1629. Active as helper of pestilents in Cavaillon in 1631. Superior of Jonquières in 1634. Starts to edit and to publish his works. Coming back from a visit to his editor in Lyon he drowns in the Rhône. Buried in Pont-Saint-Esprit on the second of February, 1638.

editions

Le directeur spirituel (...) (Lyon, Jean Julliéron, 1638) [probably finished before 1634. This work, which is also known under the name Les fleurettes de dévotion, also contains the Traité de l'oraison]

literature

Willebrord-Christian van Dijk, `Véran de Cavaillon', Dict. de Spir, 16 (1994), 379-382.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vergel de Virginidad

Sixteenth century work by an unknown Franciscan friar

literature

DSpir 16 (1994), 403-409.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Véronica Giuliani (1660-1727) Sancta. See for more information the Franciscan Women Internet Database

Poor Clare Cap. Wrote a lengthy spiritual diary, replete with transcripts of her correspondence.

literature

DSpir 16 (1994), 473-483; Remo Bistoni, Santa Veronica e i suoi fioretti (Cinisello Balsamo, 1999); Monique Courbat, ‘Veronica Giuliani: writing and rewriting’, Greyfriars Review 13 (1999), 297-317; Giovanni Battista Paniccià, Veronica Giuliani, Collana Teatro Sacro 3 (S. Maria degli Angeli-Assisi, 1999); Marisa Borchielli, Veronica Giuliani. La fiamma dell’amore, Le Colline della Speranza. Ininerari di santità femminile in Umbria (Città di Castello, 1999); Pacelli Millane, The fire of love in the writings of Veronica Giuliani’, The Cord 49 (1999), 188-195; Il ‘Sentimento’ tragico dell’esperienza religiosa. Veronica Giuliani (1660-1727), ed. Maria Duranti (Naples, 2000); Nicola Gori, ‘La scienza della salvezza e la grazia del purgatorio d’amore in una complessa esperienza di santa Veronica Giuliani’, Collectanea Franciscana 71,1-2 (2001), 171-207; Nicola Gori, ‘L’‘annientamento’ di santa Veronica Giuliani e il ‘nulla’ di san Giovanni della Croce’, Collectanea Franciscana 73,1-2 (2003), 241-288.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vespasianus Amphiaraeus (Vespasiano Amphiareo/Amfiareo/Alfonso Amfiareo da Ferrara/Alfonso Albertacci, fl. mid 16th cent.)

OFMConv. Friar from Ferrara (born in 1501 as a member of the Albertacci family). He spent his early youth in Florence, but apparently from the age of 18 or thereabouts, he was active in and around Venice, possibly from the moment he entered the Franciscan Conventuals. He is predominantly known as a writing master, who after nearly 30 years of teaching wrote a very popular writing manual that saw at least nineteen editions between 1548 and 1620. The first edition appeared in 1548 in Venice with the title Un novo modo d'insegnar a scrivere. Later editions, from 1554 onwards, were issued under the title Opera di Frate Vespasiano Amphiareo. All of these editions are dedicated to Francesco Donato, the Doge of Venice. In this manual, Vespasiano promoted the so-called Cancellaresca, or the Roman chancery hand, first systhematized by Ludovico degli Arighi, Giovannantonio Tagliente and Giovanni Battista Palatino.

manuscripts

Un novo modo d'insegnar a scrivere (1548): Kept in a private collection in Cambridge, Mass.

Preces piae: MS Harvard College Library.

editions

Un novo modo d'insegnar a scrivere (Venice, 1548).

Opera di F. Vespasiano Amfiareo da Ferrara, dell'Ordine minore conventuale, Nella quale s'insegna a scrivere varie sorti di lettere, & massime una lettera bastarda, da lui novamente con sua industria ritrovata, laqual serue al Cancellaresco & Mercantesco; poi insegna a far l'inchiostro negrissimo con tanta facilità, che ciascuno per semplice che sia, lo sapra far da se. Anchora a macinar l'oro et scrivere con esso come si farà con l'inchiostro parimente a scriuere con l'azurro, & col Cinaprio (...) (Venice: Gabriel Giolito da Ferrara, 1554/Gio. Antonio Rampazetto, 1588). The 1554 edition received a 20th-century facsimile issue as: Das Schreibbuch des Vespasiano Amphiareo (1554): vollständige Nachbildung in voller Grösse, ed. Jan Tschichold (Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: Dr. Crantz'sche Druckerei, 1975).

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 31; G. Medri, 'Le opere calligrafiche a stampa II: Frate Vespasiano Amphiareo da Ferrara', All'Insegna del libro 1 (1928), 49-64.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victorin Aubertin (fl. second half 17th cent.)

OFMRec. French friar from the Saint-Denys province. Mystical author, predominantly known for his Le Chrétien uni à Jésus Christ (1667).

editions

Selections of his works have been included in La vie mystique chez les franciscains du dix-septième siècle. Tome I, ed. Dominique Tronc, Collection Sources mystiques (Mers-sur-Indre: Paroisse et Famille-Centre Saint-Jean-de-la-Croix, 2014), as well as in the Gobry (2013), 202ff [see below].

literature

Ivan Gobry, Mystiques franciscains (Perpignan: Artège Editions, 2013), 202.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Victorius de Palermo (Vittorio de Palermo, d. 1635)

OFMCap.

editions/literature

Marta M.M. Romano, “Brevis ac etiam dilucida in Artem brevem Raymundi Lulli martirys subtilis declaratio’ di fra’ Vittorio da Palermo’, Schede Medievali 43 (2005), 259-264.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vigilius Greiderer (10, 12, 1715, Kufstein - 26, 12, 1780, Schwaz, Tirol)

Austrian friar. Member of the Franciscan order since 1735, after studies in Hall and Innsbruck. Priest since 1740. Fulfilled functions as lector, guardian and provincial minister. Since 1750 active in producing the Germania Franciscana, an encompassing history of the Franciscan order in the German lands, ordered by province. The first volume appeared in 1777, the second one posthumously in 1781. Volume three remained unpublished until parts of it were published in 1964.

editions:

Germania Franciscana, Vol. 1 (1777) & Vol 2 (1781); For volume three see. G. Fußenegger (ed.), Alemania Franciscana Antiqua XI.

literature:

G. Fussenegger, ‘P. Vigilius Greiderer und sein Werk’, in: Alemania Franciscana Antiqua XI, 7-8; Karlo Suso Frank, `Greiderer', LThK³, 3 (1995), 1038; DHGE XXII, 96

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vilém Anton Brauczek (fl. seventeenth cent.)

OFMRef. Scotist philosopher, active in Prague.

editions

Domus sapientiae Doctoris Subtilis I. D. Scoti erecta in tres partes logicam, physicam et metaphysicam (Prague, 1663)

 

 

 

 

Vincenzo Berdini (fl. first half 17th cent.)

OFM. Obervant friar from Sarteano (near Siena). Travelled for his order to Palestine, as the general commissioner of the Holy Places. Wrote a history of the Holy Land province, while he was active over there as Commissary General.

editions

Historia dell’antica e moderna Palestina nella quale si ha particolare descrittione dei luoghi ecclesiastici (Siena, 1633)/La Palestina Antica e Moderna, Descritta in Tre Parti (Venice: Battista Suriano, 1642).

literature

Tobler, Bibliografia Geographica Palestinae (Leipzig, 1867), 24; C. da Civezza, Saggio di bibliografia sanfrancescana (Prato, 1879), 40-41; Amat di S. Filippo, Biografia dei viaggiatori italiani (Rome, 1882), 411; Marianne Petra Ritsema van Eck, Custodians of Sacred Space: Constructing the Franciscan Holy Land through texts and sacri monti (ca. 1480-1650), PhD Thesis, University of Amsterdam (Amsterdam, 2017), passim.

 

 

 

 

 

Vincenzo Berdini (Bertini, Bertinus, fl. early seventeenth cent.)

Italian friar from Sarteano. Joined the Observant Franciscans in the Siena province. Was elected Commissary General of the Franciscan Holy Land custody in 1615, and was confirmed in this function by pope Paul V in 1621. He is known for his three-volume Historia dell'antica e moderna Palestina (Venice, 1642), meant for preachers and other interested readers. The first volume contains 57 chapters on the greatness and wonders of Palestine. The second volume contains 64 chapters on the mysteries operated by Jesus Christ from the incarnation to final judgment. The third volume, containing eleven chapters, dwells on the fact that Palestine, old and new belongs by right to the Observant Franciscans and also discusses other Christian communities there. Each volume starts with a lengthy list of sources used, presenting his work as the result of careful research and personal experience.

literature

G. M. Mazzuchelli, Gli Scrittori d'Italia (Brescia, 1760) II/2, 915, 1059; Sigismondo di Venezia, Biografia serafica (Venice, 1846), 611; T. Tobler, Bibliographia geographica Palaestinae (Leipzig, 1867), 24; Angela Codazzi, 'Berdini, Vincenzo', Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 8 (1966) [http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/vincenzo-berdini_(Dizionario-Biografico)/ ]

 

 

 

 

 

Vincenzo Ciorla (Vicenzo Ciorla da Scanno, fl. seventeenth cent.)

OFMConv. Scotist theologian. Regent lector of the Franciscan studia of Lanciano, Benevento and L'Aquila. Provincial minister of the Abruzzo province (1640-1643). He apparently died in 1655 at the age of 56.

editions

Disputationes logicales collectae ex doctrina Scoti (Rome: Ludovici Grignani, 1646).

Disputationes physicales complectentes libros physicorum, de coelo et mundo et de meteoris, collectae ex doctrina Scoti (Rome: Ludovico Grignani, 1649).

Disputationes in libros de generatione et corruptione, de anima et metaphysica (Naples: Francesco Savio, 1651).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Coronelli (Vincenzo Coronelli/Vincenzo Maria Coronelli, 1650-1718)

OFMConv. Son of Maffio and Catarina Coronelli. He joined the Franciscan Conventuals in 1655 and embarked on theological studies, culminating in a doctirate in theology at Rome in 1674. Already before his entry into the order, Vincenzo had displayed an interest in maps, and he became a proficient map and globe maker, building a first set of full-scale globes for the Duke of Parma in or around 1678. These globes were admired by visited to the court of Parma, among was César Cardinal d’Estrées, the French ambassador to the Holy See. With the help of the contacts of the latter, Vincenzo Coronelli was invited to Paris in 1681, where he spent two years building both a terrestrial and a celestial globe or giantesk proportions for King Louis XIV of France. With a diameter of c. 3.90 meters and a weight of approximately 2 tons each, these globed surpassed all other globes in size and ornamentation until the early twentieth century. They can now be seen at the Bibliothèque nationale François Mitterrand in Paris. After three years, Vincenzo returned to Venice (1684), where he founded the Accademia Cosmografica degli Argonauti, commonly thought to be the first geographical society. Soon afterwards, Vincenzo Coronelli was appointed official cosmographer of the Republic of Venice. With the stipend from this position, Vincenze was able to start working on two large atlases, the so-called Atlante veneto and the Isolario. For these works, Vincenzo made a lot of exploratory travels through Europe, establishing himself as a geographical engineer. Vincenzo had more or less to give up his scientific pursuits in 1701, when he was elected minister-general of the Minorite order. After a regular stint of three years, Vincenzo returned to Venice in 1705. Except for a trip to Vienna, where he as consulted for measures to regulate the flow of the Danube, he stayed until his death in the Venetian friary. Vincenzo Coronelli left behind more than 100 globes, many more maps, atlasses and atlas designs, as well as seven volumes of a projected 45-volume, alphabetically organised encyclopedia in the Italian vernacular, the so-called Biblioteca Universale Sacro-Profana, which might have been the first of its kind (as a fully alphabetically organized work).

editions

Globi di Coronelli, 1681-1683. See also: Il libro dei globi di Vincenzo Coronelli, ed. Nicolangelo Scianna & introd. Franco Farinelli (Dolmas, 1999).

Atlante Veneto. Descrizione Geografica, Historica, Sacra, Profana, e Politica de'Stati dell'Universo, aggionte tutte le nuove scoperte (...) (Venice, 1691-1696).

Isolario (Venice, 1696–1698).

Morea, Negroponte e Adiacenze/Memorie Historiogeografiche della Morea riacquistata dall'Armi Venete, del Regno di Negroponte, & altri luoghi coronvicini (...) (Venice: Pietro Foscarini, 1686). Available via Google Books.

Historia del Regno di Siam figurata (...) (1689).

Epitome Cosmografica, ò compendiosa introduzione all'Astronomia, Geografia, & Idrografia per l'uso, dilucidazione, e fabrica delle sfere, globi, planisferi, astrolabi &c (Paris, 1692).

Ritratti de celebri Personaggi (1697)>

Città e Fortezze dello stato di Milano e Confinanti (1693)

Lo Specchio del Mare (1698)

Imago Mundi, edited as: Vincenzo Coronelli e l’Imago Mundi, ed. D. Domini & M. Milanese, Interventi Classensi 18 (Ravenna, 1998).

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, 7 vols. (Venice, 1701–1706). A universal encyclopedia, which was intended to contain 300.000 entries. It was one of the first vernacular encyclopedias and organised in alphabetical order. The seven volumes that appeared included information from 'A' to 'Caque'. The work was incredibly modern in its setup, not only with regard to its alphabetical structure, byt also for its numbering of articles, its numerical subdivisions of columns, and indexes in each volume. The volumes 41 and 42 were meant to contain additions and corrections, whereas volumes 43-45 were meant to contain encompassing indexes and cross-reference systems. Coronelli was also inmnovative in cursifying the titles of the volumes, which later became common practice for book titles. The Bibliothèque Nationale de Paris has all seven volumes that appeared between 1701 and 1707. Volume five can be downloaded via Google Books.

The individual volumes that appeared have the following titles:

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, antico-moderna, in cui si spiega con ordine alfabetico ogni voce, anco straniera, che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a' qualunque materia.Tomo primo A - AE. Autore Fra' Vincenzo Coronelli minor conventuale di San Francesco Cosmografo della Serenissima Repubblica(Venice: A spese di Antonio Tivani, 1701).

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, antico-moderna, in cui si spiega con ordine alfabetico ogni voce, anco straniera, che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a' qualunque materia. Tomo secondo AF - AL. Autore Fra' Vincenzo Coronelli Ministro Generale LXXVIII doppo 'l P. San Francesco di tutto 'l serafico suo Ordine de minori conv. Cosmografo della Serenissima Republica (Venice: A spese di Antonio Tivani, 1702).

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, antico-moderna, in cui si spiega con ordine alfabetico ogni voce, anco straniera, che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a' qualunque materia. Tomo terzo AM - AO. Autore Fra' Vincenzo Coronelli Ministro Generale LXXVIII doppo 'l P. San Francesco di tutto 'l serafico suo Ordine de minori conv. Cosmografo della Serenissima Republica (Venice: A spese di Antonio Tivani, 1703).

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, antico-moderna, in cui si spiega con ordine alfabetico ogni voce, anco straniera, che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a' qualunque materia. Tomo quarto AP - AZ. Autore Fra' Vincenzo Coronelli Ministro Generale LXXVIII doppo 'l P. San Francesco di tutto 'l serafico suo Ordine de minori conv. Cosmografo della Serenissima Republica (Venice: A spese di Antonio Tivani, 1703).

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, antico-moderna, in cui si spiega con ordine alfabetico ogni voce, anco straniera, che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a' qualunque materia. Tomo quinto BA - BH. Autore Fra' Vincenzo Coronelli Ministro Generale LXXVIII doppo 'l P. San Francesco di tutto 'l serafico suo Ordine de minori conv. Cosmografo della Serenissima Republica (Venice: A spese di Antonio Tivani, 1704).

Biblioteca universale sacro-profana, antico-moderna, in cui si spiega con ordine alfabetico ogni voce, anco straniera, che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a' qualunque materia. Tomo Sesto BI - BZ. Dedicato alla Serenissima Repubblica di Genova dall'autore Fra' Vincenzo Coronelli, Ministro Generale LXXVIII dopo 'l Padre San Francesco di tutto 'l serafico suo Ordine de' minori conv. Cosmografo Pubblico (Venice: A spese dell'Accademia degli Argonauti, Stampato da Gio. Battista Tramontin a San Rocco, 1706).

Biblioteca universale, sacro-profana, antico-moderna, o sia Gran Dizzionario, diviso in tomi quarantacinque, ne' quali spiegasi con ordine alfabetico ogni voce anche straniera che può avere significato nel nostro idioma italiano, appartenente a qualunque materia. Tomo settimo. Coll'aggionta d'altri X tomi figurati, già pubblicati, parimente in ugual foglio, rappresentanti in stampe di rame le singolarità, descritte nella stessa Biblioteca, che distribuisconsi uniti, o separati, a piacimento d'ogn'uno. Autore il P. Cosmografo Coronelli, ex-Generale LXXVIII della serafica sua Religione de' minori c. dopo S. Francesco (Venice, 1707).

Roma antico-moderna (1716).

Singolarita di Venezia (1708-1709).

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 562-566, 602; Pietro Rigobon, ‘Biografia e studi del P. Vincenzo Coronelli’, Archivio veneto 3:1 (1872), 267–271; N. Scianna, ‘Due rari di Vincenzo Coronelli nella Biblioteca dell’Archiginnasio’, L’Archiginnasio 89 (1904), 279-293; Ermano Armao, Vincenzo Coronelli, Cenni Sull’uomo e la Sua Vita (Florence: Bibliopolis, 1944); Roberto Almagia, ‘Vincenzo Coronelli’, Der Globusfreund 1:1 (1952), 13–27; Catalogo dei globi antichi conservati in Italia, I: I globi di Vincenzo Coronelli, ed. Maria Luisa Bonelli (Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 1960); O.-G. Saarmann Muris, Der Globus im Wandel der Zeiten (Berlin-Stuttgart, 1961), 167–173; Isidoro Gatti, Il P. Vincenzo Coronelli dei Frati Minori Conventuali negli anni del suo generalato (1701-1707), parte 1a e 2a, Pontificia Universitas Gregoriana-Miscellanea Historiae Pontifica, 41 (Rome, 1976); Monique Pelletier, ‘Les Globes de Louis XIV: les Sources françaises de l’oeuvre de Coronelli’, Imago Mundi 34 (1982); James Lawrence Fuchs, Vincenzo Coronelli and the Organization of Knowledge: The Twilight of Seventeenth-Century Encyclopedism. Ph.D. Diss (University of Chicago, 1983); Nicolangelo Scianna, ‘The Coronellis three and half foot globes. Building and engraving of the first terrestial globes’, Der Globesfreund. Wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift für Globen- und Instrumentenkunde 43/44 (Vienna, 1995), 171-188; Nicolangelo Scianna, ‘Indagine sui grandi globi a stampa di Vincenzo Coronelli’, Nuncius: Annali di Storia della Scienza 13:1 (1998), 151-168; Vincenzo Coronelli e l’‘Imago Mundi’, ed. Donatino Domini & Marica Milanesi, Interventi classensi, 18 (Ravenna: Longo Angelo Ed.-Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio,  1998); [important essay collection. See the reviews in Collectanea Franciscana 70 (2000), 647f & Miscellanea Francescana 99 (1999), 404-406; Massimo Donattini, Vincenzo Coronelli e l’immagine del mondo fra isolari e atlanti (Ravenna, 1999); Un intellettuale europeo e il suo universo. Vincenzo Coronelli (1650-1718), ed. M.G. Tavoni (Bologna, 1999); Nicolangelo Scianna, ‘Indagine sui grandi globi a stampa di Vincenzo Coronelli. Seconda parte: Il globo celeste’, Nuncius. Annali di Storia della Scienza 15: (2000), 235-257; Riccardo Vianello, ‘Precisazioni biografiche sul frate Vincenzo Maria Coronelli (Ravenna 1650-Venice 1718)’, Chioggia. Rivista di Studi e Ricerche 18 (June 2001); George Kish, ‘Coronelli, Vincenzo Maria’, in: Complete Dictionary of Scientific Biography. (2008). Available on Encyclopedia.com. (, accessed on 2 Feb. 2012; Gene Rhea Tucker, ‘Coronelli’s Texan Mississippi: A Reinterpretation of the America Settentrionale of 1688’, Terrae Incognitae 40 (2008), 82–101; Nicolangelo Scianna, ‘Sfere di carta. Il Libro dei Globi di Vincenzo Coronelli’, Charta 96 (2008), 82-87; Nicolangelo Scianna, ‘La venezianità di P. Vincenzo Coronelli ofmconv (1650-1718)’, Il Santo 48 (2008), 592f. See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vincenzo_Coronelli (visited on Febr. 2, 2012) & http://www.atlascoelestis.com/Cor%201689%20Pagina%20base.htm (visited on Febr. 2, 2012); Marica Milanesi Grendi, Vincenzo Coronelli Cosmographer (1650-1718), Terrarum Orbis, 13 (Turnhout: Brepols, 2016).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Cuenca (Vicente Cuenca Pardo, 1767-1845)

Franciscan architect from Játiva. Also known for his autobiography. See: Archivo Ibero-Americano 17 (1922), 280-283.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius de Bassiano (Vincenzo di Bassiano, d. 1694)

OFMRec.

editions

Istruttioni per la vita religiosa de’ Frati Minori Osservanti, nelli conventi della Santa Recollettione, compilate per la Provincia Osservante Romana. Con l’aggiunta per il Convento del Santo Ritiro di S. Francesco di Civitella (Roma, Per Paolo Moneta, 1684)/ A facsimile edition, edited by Luigi Sergio Mecocci appeared at Comune di Bassiano (Latina) 2000.

 

 

 

 

Vincentius de Monte (Vincentius vom Berg, fl. early 18th cent.)

OFMConv. German friar.

editions

Vincentius von Berg, Ratiocinium juventutis Franciscanae: sive Disquisitiones historico-theologicae super Regulam, Constitutiones & statum Ordinis nostri Seraphici Fratrum Minorum S. Francisci Conventualium cum inserta brevi chronologia Generalium ordinis nec non Provincialium almae hujus Provinciae Coloniensis (Cologne: apud Jacobum Meyner Bibliopolam, 1740).

 

 

 

 

Vincentius de Orleans (d. after 1674)

OFMCap. Entered the order as novice in 1633. Guardian of Blois and provincial definitor in Blois in september 1643. Preacher, also active against Jansenism.

editions

L'église de Jésus-Christ ou la communion de Rome toujours victorieuse de ses ennemis (Poitiers, 1659)

La religion chrétienne unique et nécessaire. Contre les indifférents et les hérétiques, I (Paris, 1666) [volume II apparently never appeared]

Triomphe de l'autel dû au zèle de Louis XIV, le Constantin françois did this work survive?

Le pur amour ou la dévotion solide et nécessaire (Nantes, 1674).

literature

W.-Chr. van Dijk, `Vincent d'Orleans', Dict. de Spir, 16 (1994), 832-834.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius de Rouen (d. 1658)

OFMTof. Active in Rouen, apparently also as preacher since ca. 1612. Provincial of the province of St. Louis or Lyon between 1634-37. Died as provincial of the province of St. Francis or Paris on 31 may 1658. Wrote several spiritual works.

editions

L'heureuse rencontre du ciel et de la terre en l'invention miraculeuse de l'image de la Mère de Dieu honoréee sous le titre de Notre Dame de Bonencontre (Tours, 1642)

Discours funèbre sur la mort de (...) cardinal Louys de la Valete (Toulouse, 1643)

Exercise de l'homme intérieure en la connaissance de Dieu et de soy-mesme (Paris, 1650)

literature

Sbaralea, Suppl., III, 157-58; André Derville, `Vincent de Rouen', Dict Spir, 16 (1994), 863-865.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius de Salvador (Vincente do Salvador, d. 1639)

OFMDisc. Portuguese friar. Missionary in Brazil. Historian.

literature

V. Willeke, ‘Vincente do Salvador, OFM, ‘Vater der brasilianischen Geschichtsschreibung”, Franziskanische Studien 43 (1961), 75-84. See also Collectanea Franciscana, Bibliographia franciscana XII (1958-1963), 564 (no. 2353).

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius de Sancta Maria (Vicente de Santa María, fl. c. 18th cent.)

literature

Ernesto de la Torre Villar, ‘Fray Vicente de Santa María (…)’, in: Actas del IV Congreso Internacional sobre Los Franciscanos en el Nuevo Mundo (siglo XVIII), Cholula-Puebla del 22 al 27 de julio de 1991 (Madrid: DEIMOS, 1992), 849-852.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Ingles (Vincente Inglés, fl. c. 1720)

OFM. Friar in the San Gregorio de Filipinas province, where he also became provincial minister.

literature

AIA 33 (1930), 58-59; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 130 (no. 435)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Johannes Bapista Canes (Vincent Canes/Jean-Baptiste/alias Thomas Bodwill, 1608-1672)

Friar of English descent. Born on the border of Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire in an Anglican milieu, he studied at Cambridge. After two years of studies, he moved to London, and then traveled through the Netherlands, Germany, France, and Flanders, during which period he might have converted to Catholicism. He left England again during the period of the English civil war, joining the Franciscans at Douai, taking the name Jean-Baptiste. At first, he taught philosophy and theology within the Franciscan school network in France. Then he returned to London, to work as a missionary (under the name of Thomas Bodwill). In London, albeit rather eirenic and accommodating in his doctrinal views, he became involved in polemics with the Protestant authors Stillingfleet, John Owen, Daniel Whitby, and others, which brought our Franciscan to publish of several books, published in London under his initials J.V.C. He died on 21 June 1672 in London

editions

The Reclaimed Papist: Or a dialogue between a papist knight, a protestant lady, a parson and his wife (London, 1655).

Fiat Lux: Or a general conduct to a right understanding and charity in the great combustions and broils about religion here in England, between papist and protestant presbyterian and independent (London, 1661/1662/enlarged edition in 1665). The first edition of this work drew out reactions by Stillingfleet, Owen etc.

An Epistle to the Author of the Animadversions upon Fiat Lux (London, 1663).

Diaphanta, or three attendants on Fiat Lux (1665). This also included the Epistle to the Author of the Animadversions upon Fiat Lux.

Infallibility (London, 1665).

Ti katholici Stillingfleeton, or, An account given to a Catholick friend of Dr. Stillingfleet's late book against the Roman church, together with a short postil upon his text, in three letters by I. V. C. (1672) (Bruges, 1672).

literature

Thaddeus, The Franciscans in England, 1600-1850 (London, 1898), 109-110; The English Franciscan nuns, 1619–1821, and the Friars Minor of the same province, 1618–1761, ed. R. Trappes-Lomax, Catholic Recusant Society, 24 (1922), 259-314; A. Van den Wyngaert, ‘Canes’, DHGE XI, 740; Patricia C. Brückmann, ‘Canes, Vincent (1608–1672)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004, http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/4549, accessed 3 Dec 2014).

 

 

 

Vincentius Lunellus (Vicente Lunel, 1480-1550)

OFM. Minister general between 1535 and 1541. Born in Barbastro (Huesca), Aragon. Following his initial schooling he joined the Franciscans in the Recollect friary of Nuestra Signora la Real de las Huertas (Lorca/Murcia). He was ordained priest at the age of 25, and after completing his theology studies he taught arts and theology in his order province. He was also elected custos and in that capacity he took part in the General Chapter of Toulouse (1532). There he was elected to the position of general commissary for his order at the papal curia. He kept this position until the next general chapter, held at Nice in 1535, when he was elected minister general. During his generalate he visited many order provinces and tried to deal with several pressing issues, such as the split-off of the Capuchins, the closure of monasteries in England and the development of Lutheranism and the loss of friaries in the German Empire crisis. In his position, he also engaged in diplomatic missions for pope Paul III and the emperor Charles V. To promote observance in the order and to accommodate criticism from inside and from outside (the Capuchins), he ordered the erection in each order province of a house devoted to eremitical retreat. He also actively supported the expansion of Franciscan mission to the New World. After he laid down his office at the general chapter of Mantua (1541), and the election of his successor Juan de Calvi, Lunel retreated to the friary of Lorca, where he engaged in menial tasks and contemplation, until he was approached in 1545 by Charles V to take part as theologian in the Council of Trent. Lunel also took part in the general chapter of Assisi in 1547 and was elected general definitor. He died in the San Bernardino friary in Trent in 1550. Aside from a number of letters, several writings connected with issues discussed during the first sessions of the council (on Scriptural access, translations and status, on justification and grace etc.) have survived. See on these the study of Sánchez Gil.

literature

V. Sánchez Gil, Vicente Lunel, ministro general OFM, teólogo en el Concilio de Trento, Publicaciones Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid, 1975).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Mazuelo (Vincente de Burgos/Vincente Mazuelo, fl. 15th cent.)

Spanish friar from Burgos. Entered the Franciscan order in the Concepcion province. Went to Paris for his education. After his return to Spain, he taught and engaged in translation activities. He is first and foremost known for his Castilian translation of the De Proprietatibus Rerum by Bartholomaeus Anglicus and the Pèlerinage de la vie humaine by Guillaume de Guilleville.

editions

El libro de proprietatibus rerum en romance. Historia natural: do se tratan las propriedades de todas las cosas (Tolosa: Henricus Meyer de Alemania, 1494 & Toledo: Gaspar de Avila, 1529). Richly illustrated works.

El pelegrino de la vida humana (Tolosa, Henricus Meyer de Alemannia, 1490).

literature 

Juan de San Antonio, Bibliotheca Universa Franciscana (Salamanca, 1738) III, 137; B.-J. Gallardo, Ensayo de una biblioteca española de libros raros y curiosos (Madrid, 1866) II, 154-156; M. Martínez Añibarro, Intento abbreviado de autores de la provincia de Burgos (Madrid, 1889), 74-76, 352-353; F. Vera, La cultura española medieval (Madrid, 1933) I, 199-202; M. Alamo, ‘Burgos’, DHGE X, 1360-1361.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Manuelus Castano (Vicente Manuel Castaño, fl. late 18th cent.)

OFM. Member of the Castilian province in 1790.

literature

AIA 25 (1926), 190-192; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 100 (no. 212).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Montorselli/de Monte Regali (Vincenzo Montorselli da Monte Reale, fl. mid 17th cent.)

OFMConv. Member of the San Francesco province. Lector of moral philosophy in L'Aquila and Rome. He died in Rome in 1656.

editions

Mons Regalis. Hoc est ad casus conscientiae, & animarum regimen institutio moralis theolog. verè Regia, & Utilissima (Florence: Amator Massa & Lorenzo dei Landi, 1641). Accessible via Google Books.

Selecta moralia siue De animae morbis, & medicamine breuis, & selecta tractatio (Florence: Amator Massa & Lorenzo dei Landi, 1655).

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 566; Nicola Petrone, Francescanesimo in Abruzzo: dalle origini ai nostri giorni (Biblioteca Tommasiana, 2000), 313.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Mussartus (Vincent Mussart, fl. 17th cent.)

French Franciscan tertiary. Author.

editions

Le fouet des jureurs et blasphémateurs du nom de Dieu (Troyes: Nicolas Oudot, 1614).

Selections of his works have been included in La vie mystique chez les franciscains du dix-septième siècle. Tome II: Florilège de figures mystiques de la réforme capucine, ed. Dominique Tronc, Collection Sources mystiques (Mers-sur-Indre: Paroisse et Famille-Centre Saint-Jean-de-la-Croix, 2014).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vincentius Venantius (Vincenzo Venanzio da Ancona, fl. mid 17th cent.)

OFMConv. Finished his theology studies at the Collegium S. Bonaventurae in 1625. Lector of metaphysics in Florence and regent lector in Rimini and Venice. In 1640 elected provincial minister. Thereafter he retired to Ancona and wrote a number of works.

editions

Trattenimenti civili (Rome: Eredi Corbelletti, 1657).

Disputationes Theologica de Dei essentia, relationibus, & attributis, & de dispositione ad unionem hypostaticam, in via Sancti Bonaventurae (Ancona: Typis Salvioneis, 1660).

Academia sacra, discorsi academici diversi di materie sacre, con in fine quatro elogi a quatro Pontefici Francescani Conventuali, Niccolò IV, Alessandro V, Sisto IV, Sisto V

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 567.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitalis de Furno (Vitalis e Furno/Joannes Vitalis/Vital du Fourca. 1260-1327)

French friar from Bazas (Gascony). Followed the lectorate program at Paris (1292-1294). Subsequently lector at the Studium Generale in Montpellier (1295, where Louis of Anjou, just released from hostage, took part in a disputation organised by Vital, and where Joannes de Fonte acted as reportator of Vitalis’ Sentences lectures) and Toulouse (ca. 1300). Thereafter, he read the Sentences at Paris (yet it is not certain that he did this ‘pro gradu'. See on this the 2006 essay of Piron). Vital probably obtained his theology degree by papal bull in 1307 or thereabouts from Clement VII, before being appointed provincial minister of Aquitaine (1307). He was made Cardinal Priest of S. Martino ai Monti by Clement in 1312 and promoted to the position of Cardinal Bishop of Albano in 1320 by Pope John XXII. Died in 1327. Already at Montpellier, Vitalis attacked some theological viewpoints of Olivi. Shortly thereafter (1298), he took an active part in the debates concerning the works and memory of Olivi, and he took part in the committee that responded to the Rotulus of Ubertino da Casale (1311). Vitalis was strongly opposed to the spirituals, yet defended the doctrine of absolute poverty against John XXII. This notwithstanding, his relationship with the pope remained sufficiently cordial to be asked for advistory statements on other issues of moral theology.

Vital has written a large number of works. Aside from his Sentences commentary and a large number of Quaestiones on doctrinal and philosophical subjects, he also wrote a Speculum Morale totius Sacrae Scripturae (a kind of dictionnary of the OT and NT, ca. 1305), sermons, and biblical commentaries, among which we can signal for instance a Commentaria in Apocalypsim, which was printed repeatedly under the name of Bonaventura and Alexander van Hales (Er wordt ook nog een Postilla in Apocalypsim aan hem toegeschreven. Over deze toeschrijving en over de vraag of het niet hetzelfde werk betreft bestaat echter grote onenigheid onder de bibliografen. V. Doucet heeft in elk geval vastgesteld dat een aantal manuscripten van deze Postilla (mss. Assisi Bibl. Comm. 50, 71, 66) qua inhoud overeenstemmen met de Postilla die P. Glorieux toeschreef aan Joannes Wallensis (o.a. Bratislava UB ms 78; Todi, Bibl. Communale ms 68).

manuscripts

In IV Sent. (Secunda Lectura): Rome, Vat.Lat. 1095 ff. 1-67 [written or finished in Montpellier. Goes against the Olivian theory of the union of the intellective faculties of the soul with the body]

Memorialia Quaestionum: Todi, 95 ff. 8a-13d [contains also the Memoralia of Joannes de Persona]. Sylvain Piron suggests that this is an abbreviation of his Quodlibet, and could have been disputed in Paris around 1292. Whether this coheres with the fact that Vitalis at that time was in his lectorate program needs further research.

Quodlibeta (18 quaestiones): Todi 95 ff. 12d-18a

Quodlibet II: Todi, 95 ff. 51b-58b

Quaestiones de Cognitione (8 quaestiones): Todi, 95 ff. 58b-89a

Quaestiones Alie (7 quaestiones de principio rerum): Todi, 95 ff. 18a-22a

Quaestiones Disputatae (7 quaestiones) Todi, 95 ff. 24b-51b

Tertium Quolibet (15 quaestiones) ff. 89b-104d

Quaestio de Paupertate: a.o. Madrid Nac. 4165 [ms also contains materials of Ubertino and contemporaries]

Marriage ‘consilium' for John XXII (inc: ‘Queritur utrum susceptio sacri ordinis dirimat matrimonium inter persona legitimas...' (see for the edition the 2009 work of Nold below).

editions

Vitalis de Furno OFM, In IV. Librum Sententiarum, Dist. 24 pars 2 (Cod. Vat. Lat. 1095, fol. 32vb-34vb), ed. L. Hödl, in: Lex et Sacramentum im Mittelalter, ed. P. Wilpert & R. Hoffmann, Miscellanea Mediaevalia, 6 (Berlin, 1969), 19-30.

Joannes Moylin (ed.) Speculum morale totius Sacrae Scripturae (Lyon, 1513 en 1568; B. Junta (ed.) Venetië, 1594 (Vaticana, Barb. V. VI. 26), 1600 en 1603.

Commentario super Apocalypsim. Venetië, 1600; Joannes de la Haye (ed.) Alexander Halensis, Commentario in Apocalypsim. Paris, 1647; Benoît Bonnelli (ed.) Expositio in Apocalypsim. in: Supplementum operum omnium S. Bonaventurae. II, 5. Trente, 1773. 5-1035.

Quodlibeta tria, ed. F. Delorme, Spicilegium Pontificii Athenaei Antoniani, 5 (Rome, 1947) (with the Memorialia Quaestionum in the appendix on pp. 221-229); La France Franciscaine, 9 (1926), 452-471;

F. Delorme (ed.), `Le Quodlibet I du cardinal Vital du Four', La France Franciscaine 2, 18, 1 (1935), 108-9; See on these works and on the chronology of Vital du Four’s career in this context the remarks of Piron (2006).

Quaestio V of Quodlibet de Cognitione/ Quaestio 12 of Quodl. II de Christo et de BMV/Quaestio IV of Quodlibet II de Anima: see F. Delorme, `L'Oeuvre scolastique...', La France franciscaine 9 (1926), 421-471.

Comm. super Librum de Sex Principiis, ed. A.J. Gondras, Ad'HLMA, 42 (1975), 196-317.

F. Delorme (ed.), `Huit Questions disputées sur le problème de la connaissance', Ad'HDLMA 2 (1927), 155-336

Quaestiones Breves de Rerum Principio, ed. F. Delorme, Sophia, 10 (1942), 290-327

Tractatus de Primo Rerum Omnium Principio, ed. L. Wadding, in: Ioh. Duns Scoti Opera Omnia (Lyon, 1639), t. III & Ioh. Duns Scoti Opera Omnia, ed. Vives (Paris, 1891), t. VI, 721-799.

??Speculum Morale Totius Sacrae Scripturae Zawart, 363 & Cuneo, 72

Quaestio de Paupertate: Hist. Lit. de la France, 36, pp. 295-305. The text was also included in F. Tocco, La questione della povertà nel sec. XIV (Naoles, 1910), 51-57, 77-84.

Sermo de Conceptione B.V. Maria, in: Jean Gerson, Opera Omnia (Basel, 1494), f. 47 & Petrus de Alvay Astorga (ed.), Monumenta pro Immaculata Conceptione (Louvain, 1665), 87-191 [?]/Zawart, 298; Franz. Stud., 8 (1921), 283-292; AFH, 16 (1924), 300

Marriage ‘consilium' for John XXII, edited by Patrick Nold in his study Marriage Advice for a Pope: John XXII and the Power to Dissolve, Medieval Law and its Practice, 3 (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2009), passim (with a critical edition of the text on pp. 3-22). With thanks to Patrick Nold, who was so kind to provide me with a copy of this book.

literature

Wadding, Scriptores. 220; Sbaralea, Supplementum. III. 159-161; G. Mazzatinti, Inventari dei manoscritti delle biblioteche d'Italia IV (Forli, 1895), 31, 33-34; P. Glorieux, ‘D'Alexandre de Hales à Pierre Auriol. La suite des maîtres franciscains de Paris au xiiie siècle.' Archivum Franciscanum Historicum. 26 (1933); V. Doucet, ‘Maîtres franciscains de Paris. Supplément.' Archivum Franciscanum Historicum 27 (1934), 553 ff; Auguste Pisvin, ‘Die Intuitio und ihr metaphysischer Wert nach Vitalis de Furno († 1327) und Gonsalvus Hispanus († 1313)’, Wissenschaft und Weisheit 12 (1949), 147-162; P. Godefroy, ‘Vital du Four.' Dict. de Théologie Catholique XV (Paris, 1950), 3102-3115; Stegmüller, RB. V. no. 8309-8312; V. Heynck, `Zur Bußlehre des Vitalis de Furno. Die Wirkkraft der priestlichen Absolution', Franz. Stud., 41 (1959), 163-212; L. von Untervintl, `Die Intuitionslehre bei Vitalis de Furno, OM (d. 1327)', Coll. Franc. 25 (1955), 53-113, 225-258; John E. Lynch, The Theory of Knowledge of Vital du Four (St. Bonaventure: Franciscan Institute Publications, 1972); C. Cenci (ed.), Bibliotheca manuscripta ad sacrum conventum assisiensum, I, Assisi 1981, 197, no. 263; S.D. Dumont, ‘Giles of Rome and the ‘De rerum principio’ attributed to Vital du Four’, AFH 77 (1984), 81-109; L. Duval-Arnould, ‘L'élaboration d'un document pontifical: Les travaux préparatoires à la constitution apostolique Cum inter nonnullos (12 Novembre 1323)', in: Aux origines de l'État moderne: Le foncionnement administratif de la papauté d'Avignon. Actes de la table ronde d'Avignon (23-24 janvier 1988), Collection de l'École Française de Rome, 138 (Rome, 1990), 385-409; François-Xavier Putallaz, `La connaissance de soi au Moyen Age. Vital du Four', Coll. Franc., 60 (1990), 505-537; V. Mauro, ‘La disputata de anima tra Vitale du Four e Pietro di Giovanni Olivi’, Studi Medievali 38 (1997), 89-139; C. Valsecchi, Oldrado da Ponte e i suoi Consilia: Un' auctoritas del primo trecento (Milan, 2000), 169, note 154 (with a reference to Vital's supposed position as ‘auditor sacri palatii'; A.G. Traver, ‘Vital du Four’, in: A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages, ed. Jorge J.E. Gracia & Timothy B. Noone, Blackwell Companions to Philosophy, 24 (Oxford: Blackwell, 2003), 670-671; David Burr, ‘The Antichrist and the Jews in four thirteenth-century Apocalypse commentaries’, in: Friars and Jews in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, ed. Steven J. McMichael & Susan E. Myers, The Medieval Franciscans, 2 (Leiden-Boston, 2004), 23-38; Sylvain Piron, ‘Franciscan Quodlibeta in Southern Studia and at Paris, 1280-1300’, in: Theological Quodlibeta in the Middle Ages. The Thirteenth Century, ed. Chris Schabel (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2006), 403-438; Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, XI Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) XI/3-4, 401-403; Stephen F. Brown, ‘Vitalis de Furno (Vital du Four) (ca. 1260-1327)’, in: Historical Dictionary of Medieval Philosophy and Theology, ed. Stephen F. Brown & Juan Carlos Flores (Lanham, Md., 2007), 291; Patrick Nold, Marriage Advice for a Pope: John XXII and the Power to Dissolve, Medieval Law and its Practice, 3 (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2009), passim; Timothy B. Noone, ‘The Problem of the Knowability of Substance: The Discussion from Eustachius of Arras to Vital du Four’, in: Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown, ed. Kent Emery jr., Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer & Maxime Mauriège (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 63-90; Roberto Plevano, ‘Vital du Four’, in: Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy: Philosophy between 500 and 1500, ed. Henrik Lagerlund, 2 Vols. (Dordrecht: KLuwer, 2011) II, 1369-1372.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitus Chiaramontensis (Vito Pizza da Chiaramonte, fl. late 16th cent.)

OFMConv. Sicilian friar. Doctor in philosophy and theology (Messina: Fausto Bufalini, 1589).

editions

Sermoni predicabili sopra il celebre salmo del profeta David: Miserere mei Deus, devotissimi et al Christiano utilissimi con una meditatione nel fine di ciascun di quelli, fatta a Christo crucifisso, et nel fine posto un fruttuoso sermone della Misericordia divina (...) (Messina: Fausto Bufalini, 1589). Accessible via Google Books.

De Divino, & humano intellectu, in sententia Peripateticorum?

De ente, & essentia?

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 573; Filippo Evola, Storia tipografico-letteraria de secolo xvi in Sicilia, con un catalogo regionato (Palermo: Stabilimento Tipografico Lao, 1878), 293-294.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitus Cortonensis (Vitus de Cortona, fl. 13th cent.)

Compiler of the vita of Umiliana dei Cerchi.

literature

Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, XI Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) XI/3-4, 404.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vitus Lepori (Vito Lepori da Gorizia, fl. 17th cent.)

OFMConv. Entered the Collegium S. Bonaventurae in 1652. After completing his three-year advanced theology education, he first became magister studium in Bologna and later regent lector in the studium of Graz (Styria province). He developed into a celebrated preacher, who preached in many of the largest Italian cities, both during the Lenten season and at other occasions. Due to his homiletic reputation, he was asked to become court preacher at the imperial court of Vienna [did this ever come to pass? check!]. Also high offices within the Conventual branch (general visitator of the Styrian, Austrian, Bohemian, Carinthian, Cologne and Westphalia provinces, guardian of the Venice friary). he died on 26 May 1691.

editions

Relazione della solennità (...) (1652).

literature

Giovanni Franchini, Bibliosofia e memorie letterarie di scrittori Francescani conventuali Ch'hanno scritto dopo 'Anno 1585 (Modena: Eredi Soliani Stampatori, 1693), 567-573.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Volmar (Bruoder Volmar, fl. c. 1390)

Friar from Southern Germany or Switzerland. Probably active as confessor of a female convent or monastery near St. Gallen. To him probably can be ascribed two mystical religious sayings, as well as a sermon on the nine different kinds of angels.

manuscripts

Predigt von den Engeln: MS St. Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek 967 pp. 261-263. This sermon was probably preached in the closing decade of the fourteenth century, on Michaelsday. The manuscript, in which the sermon has survived, and which itself dates from c. 1430-1437, is largely written by Friedrich Kölner, himself confessor of the female monastery of St. George, near St. Gallen.

Geistliche Sprüche [ca. 1391, by Bruoder Volmar ein barfuoze]: MS Berlin, mgq 191 ff. 387v-388v

editions

Geistliche Sprüche, ed. in: F. Pfeiffer, ‘Sprüche deutscher Mystiker’, Germania 3 (1858), 232-235.

literature

Peter Ochsenbein, ‘Volmar OFM’, VL² X, 500-501.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wager Lewis (d. 1562)

Franciscan friar and later Anglican/Protestant playwright. Active in the London friary by the early 1520s. He is known to have become a subdeacon on 21 July 1521. When the situation for the frtiars became problematical, Wager Lewis gradually took his leave from the order. On 24 March 1536 he received permisison from the bishop to wear his Franciscan habit beneath the robes of a secular priest. Several years later, he was a married Protestant vicar. He might even be the father of the Enbglish clergyman and playwright William Wager (1537/8?–1591). He survived the Mary Tudor interlude, and in April 1560 he became parish priest of St James Garlickhythe, in London. He died over two years later, leaving behind his widow Elenore. During his Protestant years, Wager lewis wrote A new enterlude … of the life and repentaunce of Marie Magdalene, not onlie godlie, learned and fruitefull, but also well furnished with pleasaunt myrth and pastime, very delectable for those which shall hear or reade the same. This work was printed by John Charlewood in 1566/1567. The play combined later medieval theatrical influences with John Calvin’s Institutes. The surviving fragment of yet another play, entitled The Cruel Debtor, might be his work as well, although the work is also ascribed to William Wager, who is considered to be Wager Lewis’s son.

editions

The Life and Repentance of Mary Magdalene, by Lewis Wager. A Morality Play reprinted from the Original Edition of 1566-67, ed. Frederic Ives Carpenter, Decennial Publications of the University of Chicago, Second Series, I (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1902). Apparently available via https://archive.org. See also the review in The Journal of English and Germanic Philology 5:2 (December 1903), 225-238. A new edition has been provided in Paul Whitfield White, Reformation biblical drama in England: The Life and Repentaunce of Mary Magdalene, The History of Iacob and Esau (New York: Garland, 1992).

literature

W.H. Phelps, ‘The date of Lewis Wager's death’, Notes and Queries 223 (1978), 420-421; Paul Whitfield White, ‘Lewis Wager's The life and repentaunce of Marie Magdalene and John Calvin’, Notes and Queries 226 (1981), 508-512; Mark Eccles, Brief lives: Tudor and Stuart authors (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1982), 123-124; Peter Happé, ‘The protestant adaptation of the saint play’, in: The saint play in medieval Europe, ed. Clifford Davidson, Early Drama, Art, and Music Monograph Series, 8 (Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 1986), 205-240; Paul Whitfield White, Reformation biblical drama in England: The Life and Repentaunce of Mary Magdalene, The History of Iacob and Esau (New York: Garland, 1992), passim; Patricia Badir, ‘'To allure vnto their loue': Iconoclasm and Striptease in Lewis Wager's The Life and Repentaunce of Marie Magdalene’, Theatre Journal 51:1 (1999) 1-20; Peter Happé, ‘Wager, Lewis (d. 1562)’, in: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004 /digitally accessible via http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/28394); The Turn of the Soul: Representations of Religious Conversion in Early Modern Art and Literature, ed. Lieke Stelling, Harald Hendrix, and Todd Richardson (Leiden: Brill, 2012), 63, 65-66, 76-77.

 

 

 

 

Walram von Siegburg (fl. c. 1440)

German friar, who entered the theology degree program at Cologne university in 1430, and became magister regens in 1435. Remained active as theology professor until 1443, and was Dean of the theology faculty between 1435 and 1439. We still have the autograph of his graduate student note book, which not only gives detailed information on the courses and (extra)curricular activities he had to fulfill for his graduation as bachelor and master at Cologne university, replete with themes/titles and texts of disputations, principia and the ceremonial acts for the promotion (including his Vesperiae, Collatio, Disputatio in Aula, and the Resumpta on the day of his promotion), but also informs us about his promotores, the official opponents during his doctorate defense, related officials, and fellow students (such as Heinrich von Werl). Most relevant passages of this graduate student note book have been edited by Clasen.

manuscripts

Graduate student note book: MS Cologne, Historisches Archiv der Stadt GB f° 175 ff. 1r-32v

editions

S. Clasen, ‘Walram von Siegburg O.F.M. und seine Doktorpromotion an der Kölner Universität’, AFH 45 (1952), 323-396.This edition includes the text of Walram’s Principium super Primum Sententiarum (his actual Sentences lectures do not seem to have survived).

literature

S. Clasen, ‘Walram von Siegburg O.F.M. und seine Doktorpromotion an der Kölner Universität’, AFH 44 (1951), 257-317; AFH 45 (1952), 72-126, 323-396; J. Vennebusch, Die theologische Handschriften des Stadtarchivs Köln, Teil I, Mitteilungen aus dem Stadtarchiv von Köln, Sonderreihe Heft 1, Teil 1(Cologne, 1976), 151-158.

 

 

 

 

 

Wawrzyniec Ignacy Bonawentura Bodoch (1607-1691)

OFMRef. Polish friar.

literature

Miroslawa Dopierala-Molotkin, ‘Bodoch (Bodock, Bodocki) Wawrzyniec Ignacy Bonawentura’, in: Encyklopedia polskiej emigracji I (2003), 228.

 

 

 

 

 

Wernerus Ratisbonensis (Wernherus/Bernherus/Wirnherus/Werner von Regensburg, d. after 1290)

Lector of the convent of Regensburg and in 1266 custos of Bavaria. In 1278 he was arbiter in a conflict between the monastery of St. Emmeran and the bishop of Regensburg. After 1290, when he is mentioned as a friar from Regensburg in a document referring to the death of Duke Henry of Bavaria, Werner disappears from view. Werner is mostly known for his concise and well-written Soliloquia (Liber Soliloquorum). This work reaches back to Augustine and other authors who compiled comparable Soliloquia and Meditationes (John of Fécamp, Anselm, Hugh of St. Victor etc.). But the work of Werner also contains personal reflections. The existing edition divides the work into 11 chapters (1. An invitation to find and look for God (heavily dependent on Anselm of Canterbury’s prayer ‘Eia nunc homuncio’); 2. The Trinity (heavily dependent on Anselm’s Monologion 39-40, works of Hilary of Poitiers, and Augustine’s De Trinitate); 3. The Holy Gost; 4. God is everywhere and invisible (referring to the Proslogion and the Confessiones); 5. The nature of angels (the nine choirs of angels and their repective roles and qualities); 6. The marvels surrounding the creation of the first man (in any case partly based on Bonaventure’s Breviloquium II, 9-11, and providing a rather positive interpretation of Eve’s creation as man’s equal: ‘nec dominam nec ancillam parasti sed sociam.’); 7. The great deeds performed by God before the coming of Christ (some references to the patriarchs, kings, and prophets, but heavy emphasis on Mary, using Anselm’s Oratio ad S. Mariam); 8. The great deeds of redemption that Christ and his body performed; 9. The wonders of the Eucharist (heavy emphasis on the transsubstaantiation doctrine); 10. The final judgment (strong affirmation of the resurrection doctrine, based on I Cor. 15), and describing the qualities of the resurrected body of the blessed and the ‘corpora mortaliter viva, quae sic moriuntur ut numquam permoriantur’ of the damned); 11. The presence of God in man's memory (based almost completely in on Augustine's last chapter of the Confessions [compare Dante]. Werner ends with the supplication ‘Sit interim in te mihi quies per gratiam, donec intrem in gaudium Domini mei, beatorum participaturus gloriam, ubi es tu Deus cordis mei et pars mea Deus in aeternum. Hoc per te mihi detur, qui in Trinitate perfecta cum Patre et Spiritu Sancto unus Deus vivis in secula seculorum. Amen.’).

manuscripts

Soliloquia: MS Regensburg cod. 731, ff. 49-62; MS Munich CLM 13102 (14th cent., from the Prüfening monastery); MS Munich CLM 8496 (15th cent.), MS Regensburg Collégiale U.L. Frau (an. 1475, copy by Johannes Weissenbergen). Pez mentiones an additional manuscript that apparently is lost.

editions

Liber Soliloquiorum, ed. B. Pez, Bibliotheca Ascetica Antiquonova, 4 (Regensburg, 1724).

Literature

O. Bonmann, `Werner von Regensburg und sein Liber Soliloquorum', Zeitschrift für Aszese und Mystik, 12 (Innsbruck, 1937), 294-05[?]; A. Solignac, `Werner de Ratisbonne (Wernherus, Wirnherus, Bernherus)', Dict. De Spir, 16 (1994), 1369-71; Johannes Schlageter, `Werner von Regensburg, Franziskanertheologe († nach 1290)', Lexikon des Mittelalters IX (1998), 7-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Werner Vermann (second half 15th century)

Student and teacher at Erfurt and Greifswald, known for his openings sermon of Greifswald University.

literature

Meier, `De Schola Franciscana Erfordiensi Saeculi XV', Antonianum, 5 (1930), p. 342.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Werner Saulheimensis (Werner von Saulheim, fl. 14th cent.)

Chronicle of the Franciscan friar Werner of Saulheim, printed in: Johann Martin Kremer, Origines Nassoicae, Teil II: Diplomatica (Wiesbaden, 1779).

literature

Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, XI Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) XI/3-4,445f.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wiger Trajectensis (Wiger Trajectensis/Frater Wygerus Alemannus/Wiger van Utrecht, fl. c. 1230)

Dutch prelate and compiler of an exempla collection. He was a well-educated cleric, who probably had received a theological education in one of the Parisian schools, possibly all the way up to the magisterium, was known for his knowledge of canon law, and later taught in the diocesan or capitular schools of the Utrecht diocese, as canon of St. Peter and as as Dean of St Peter (between 1213-and ca. 1220) and subsequently became a well- connected provost of of the Collegiate Church of St. Peter in Utrecht - and hence in close contact with many leading prelates and secular rulers of the region - before he joined the Franciscans after April 1228. He corresponded with churchmen such as Caesarius of Heisterbach (who in his Libri octo miraculorum says that a certain exemplum had been given to him by Wiger and mentions in passing that the Provost of St. Peter had recently become a Friar Minor ['Detulit michi magister Wigerus, prepositus in ecclesia Traiectenti, nunc in ordine fratrum Minorum conversus, quod dicturus sum', Die Wundergeschichten des Caesarius, ed. Hilke, 101]), Olivier of Paderborn and possibly also with Jacques de Vitry, and he also was on friendly terms with Elias of Cortuna during the latter's generalate. Chapter 8 of Eccleston's chronicle mentions that Wiger was sent on a visitation mission to the Franciscan English province at the request of Elias [calling Wiger 'valde famosus in peritia iuris'/'in omni honestate conspicuus', but also indicating that the visitation itself was a disaster]. David Ross Winter suggests that Wiger has suffered from a condemnatio memoriae in the order after the deposition of Elias, and that this is in part behind the fact that he is nearly completely ignored as an important author of a substantial exempla collection, and as an important learned friar during the early history of the Franciscan order. David Ross Winter even speculates about the possibility that Wiger joined Elias in exile to the court of Frederick II after the deposition of Elias at the Franciscan general chapter of 1239, but also indicates that this is mere conjecture, and that it is also possible that he ended his life as a clerical friar in the german order province. Whatever the validity of this, it is in any case certain that he became a friar when the Franciscan order was expanding into the German world, a process that had started with the decisions of the Bologna general chapter of 1221, and that had quite quickly progressed with the erection of friaries in Mainz, Speyer, Worms, Strasbourg and Cologne before 1225. As the Friars Minor were not yet established in the Low Countries as such, it is possible that Wiger relocated to Cologne to make his profession. In any case, the first recorded presence of a Minorite house in Utrecht dates from the 1240s. This is of course not to say that the Franciscans might not have been present there before.

manuscripts

Liber exemplorum sub titulis redactorum/Summa Wigeri: Oxford, Corpus Christi College, MS 32, ff. 12vb-49va; Troyes, Bibliothèque municipale MS 1548, ff. 99va-158v. His exempla also indicate that Wiger was well informed about recent political and ecclesiastical affairs far beyond the boundaries of the Utrecht diocese.

literature

David Ross Winter, ‘The Life and Career of Master Wiger of Utrecht (fl. 1209-1237): An early convert to the Order of Friars Minor’, Journal of Medieval History 31 (2005), 71-126.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wistasses (Buisine, fl. ca. 1268)

?

manuscripts

Sermones (ca. 1260): Paris, BN Lat. 15956

Sermones (ca. 1268): Paris, BN Lat. 16499

literature

Zawart, 300

 

 

 

 

Wojciech Debolecki (Wojciech Dembolecki, 1585–1646)

Polish Franciscan friar, composer, poet and author of very strange works on the origin languages. As a composer, he was apparently rather innovative. He was, for instance one of the first to integrate the basso continuo in his compository structure. In his poetry, he touched on the main themes of Polish Sarmatism, a cultural movement/ideology among the Polish nobility with specific claims on the origin and uniqueness of Poland, Polish culture, and the Polish language. He was the vicar (and historian) of the rather bloodthirsty Lisowczycy mercenary cavalry.

editions

Przewagi Elearów polskich co ich niegdy Lisowczykami zwano (Warchaw, 1619-1623)

O tym, ze najdawniejsze w Europie jest Krolestwo Polskie, a jezyk slowienski pierwotnym jezykiem swiata (Warchaw, 1633). Re-issued in Lignum Vitae 8 (2007), 273-294. A work in which Wojciecj argued that the Polish Kingdom was the oldest kingdom of Europe, and the Slavic language the oldest language of the world.

 

 

 

 

 

Wolfgang Schmitt (d. 1779)

Canonist

literature

A. García y García, `textos jurídicos de autores franciscanos (...)', in: Editori di Quaracchi, 100 anni dopo (Rome, 1997), 315.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wolfhart (pruder Wolfhart minner prüder, fl. early fifteenth cent.)

Friar from Bavaria or Austria. Maybe member of the Vienna convent (although he doe not appear in any of the known sources related to this Franciscan settlement). Known for his corrections and annotations on a manuscript with sermons by Berthold of Regensburg (MS Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale cod. 11083-11084[a] (early 15th cent.). The identification is made on f. 173vb: pruder Wolfhart minner prüder Orden Corrigirer dicz Püchs). These corrections and annotations - many of which are marginal glosses with additional information and citations - show that Wolfhart was very well-versed in canon law, biblical and doctrinal theology, as well as natural and classical lore. Wolfart probably should be identified with the minorite friar who was forced to apologize by legates of the Basel council to a secular cleric of the Viennese St. Stephan church. This Wolfart had attacked the secular cleric on the question whether one could consume, for medicinal purposes, wine in which a part of the cross of Christ had been dipped (Wolfart apparently was in favour of such usage of wine). This (German) apology (and retraction) has survived, as well as a Latin sermon on this subject by another cleric (Johan Geuß).

manuscripts/editions

Corrections and annotations on a manuscript with sermons by Berthold of Regensburg (MS Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale cod. 11083-11084[a] (early 15th cent.). Wolfart’s corrections and annotations are included in the critical apparatus of Berthold von Regensburg, Predigten, ed. F. Pfeiffer & J. Strobl, 2 Bände (Vienna, 1862-1880/Second edition, Vienna, 1965)

German apology and retraction: Seitenstetten, Stiftsbibliothek CCXXI ff. 192-204 [among the Eucharist sermons of Johan Geuß]; Vienna, 5253 ff. 53r-54v; Vorau, Stiftsbibliothek 361 ff. 148v-149r. Partial editions of the text can be found in Richter (1969), 15; Franz (1960), 471, note 1. More complete edition in: Codices Manuscripti Bibliothecae Seitenstettensis II, 49-50.

literature

A. Franz, Die kirchlichen Benediktionen im Mittelalter, 2 Bände (Neudruck, Graz, 1960), 470-473; D. Richter, Die deutsche Überlieferung der Predigten Bertholds von Regensburg, MTU 21 (Munich, 1969), 10-16; Monika Costard, ‘Bruder Wolfhart OFM’, VL² X, 1363-1364.

 

 

 

 

Wunibald Bergleitner (1638-1693)

OFMCap. Friar from Tirol. Entered the order in June 1657. Preacher and anti-Protestant polemicist. Died at Salzburg, on 13 February 1693.

editions

Kurtz und Gut, das ist: wahrer und klarer Unterricht den catholischen Glauben zu vertheidigen; Nothwendiger Bericht und Unterricht auss der H. Bibel auff die Frag ‘wo stehts geschrieben?; Einfaltiger catholischer Discurs von dem Hochwürdig Sacrament unter einerley Gestalt (Salzburg, 1686).

literature

C. Neuner, Literarische Tätigkeit in der nordtiroler Kapuzinerprovinz (Innsbruck, 1929), 148; A. Teetaert, ‘Bergleitner’, DHGE VIII, 472. 

 

 

 

 

Yves d’Evreux

OFMCap. Missionary and author.

literature

Franz Obermeier, ‘Documentos inéditos para a história do Maranhão e do Nordeste na obra do capuchinho francês Yves d’Evreux Suitte de l’histoire (1615)’, Boletim do Museo Paranense Emílio Goeldi 1 (2005), 195-251. [On Capuchin missions in the North of Brazil and the Suitte de l’Histoire de la mission advenues en Maragnan, és années 1613-1614]

Yves Magistri (fl. 1611)

Obs.>>

editions

Miroyers et guides fort propres pour les dames et demoiselles de France qui seront de bonne volonté envers Dieu et leur salut, Reprint edition Bourges 1585, Instrumenta Franciscana 10 (Sint Truiden, 1996).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yvo Parisiensis (Charles de la Rue/Franciscus Allaeus, 1588-1678)

OFMCap. Born in Paris. Studied in Italy (Ficino and Platonism, as well as Lullist influences). Further studies of law at Orléans. Advocate at the Parliament of Paris (1610-19). After the deat of his father and the apparent ruin of his family, he retired in a Capuchin convent in 1619, taking Yves as his order name. Became priest in 1632. Prolific author on a range of topics, including natural theology, and spiritual works. His first book issued after his profession, entitled Les heureux succès de la piété (Paris, 1632), which reacted against the book Le Directeur spirituel désinteréssé of Jean-Pierre Camus, secretary of Francis of Sales, drew a huge controversy. Yves attacked Camus's thesis that secular clerics made better spiritual guides than regular clerics. Eventually, Camus was able to have the book condemned by the University of Paris. But after Camus became bishop of Belley, he wrote an apology concerning the matter to the Capuchin leaer Joseph du Tremblay. In 1633, Yves wrote his major work, the La théologue naturelle ou les premières véritez de la foy sont éclaircies par raisons sensibles et moralles, which was directed against sceptic tendencies in France. Opposed to the Augustinians of Port Royal and other forms of Jansenism. After 1646, Yves transferred to the monastery of Meudon (where he worked on his Digestum sapientiae), and after 1649, due to political unrest, Yves transferred to Croisie near St. Lazaire, where he remained until 1657 (continuing his work on the Digestum sapientiae, writing the Traité de la necessité, Conduite du religieux, two astrological works (published under the pseudonym of Franciscus Allaeus), namely Astrologia nova methodus and Mi>Fatum Universi, as well as the L'agent de Dieu dans le monde and Ius naturale rebus creatis a Deo constitutum). Back in Paris after 1567, he continued working on his Digestum. In Paris, he wrote his last worksLes vaines ecuses des pécheurs, Les fausses opinions du monde, ou le monde combatu dans ses maxcimes criminelles, Le gentil-homme chrestien, Le magistrat chrestien and, near the end of his life, he also oversaw the publication of the first volume of Les oeuvres françoises du P. Yves de Paris He died in Paris after a long proces of dementia in 1678, at the age of 90. Somehow, the order rather quickly after this death began to ignore his literary legacy.

editions

Les heureux succès de la piété (Paris, 1632).

La théologue naturelle, 4 Vols. (Paris, 1633-1637); La théologue naturelle ou les premières véritez de la foy sont éclaircies par raisons sensibles et moralles (Paris, 1633); La théologie naturelle. Tome second. De l'immortalité de l'âme, des anges et démons (Paris, 1634);La théologie naturelle. Tome troisiesme. Des perfections de Dieu, de sa Providence, de sa Iustice (Paris, 1635); La théologie naturelle. Tome quatriesme. De la Religion. Que la religion chrestienne est la vraye (Paris, 1637). This work deals in a rather roundabout, eclectic and essayistic way with the existence of God, the created nature of the world, and with a host of other themes to proof the truth and the wisdom of Christian faith. Due to its style, it was rather successful.

Les morales chrétiennes, 4 Vols. (Paris, 1638-1642). This book was translated into German as Die Tugend-Schule der Christen: Worinnen ein jeder Mensch aufferbaulich unterwiesen wird wie er pflichtmässig sein Leben anstellen solle (Prague, 1715).

Traité de l'indifférence (Paris, 1638). A study in human anthropology

Les progrès de l'amour divin (1642/3)

Très humble remonstrance faite à la reyne (Paris, 1645). Against Jansenism.

Les misericordes de Dieu dans la conduite de l'homme (Paris, 1645). Against Jansenism.

Le souverein pontife (Paris, 1645). Against Jansenism.

Digestum sapientiae, in quo habetur scientiarum omnium rerum divinarum atque humanarum nexus, et ad prima principia reductio, 4 Vols. (Paris, 1647-1672). A huge scholastic work of more than 4000 pages and an attempt to connect all sciences from a leading Christian principles, partly inspired by the Bonaventurean theme of reductio artium ad theologiam.

Traité de la necessité

Conduite du religieux

(Franciscus Allaeus), Astrologia nova methodus, issued with his friend the Margrave of Asserac.

(Franciscus Allaeus), Fatum Universi, issued with his friend the Margrave of Asserac.

L'agent de Dieu dans le monde (Paris, 1655).

Ius naturale rebus creatis a Deo constitutum (Paris, 1656).

Les vaines ecuses des pécheurs (Paris, 1661).

Les fausses opinions du monde, ou le monde combatu dans ses maxcimes criminelles (Paris, 1688). Published after his death.

Le gentil-homme chrestien (Paris, 1666).

Le magistrat chrestien (Paris, 1688). Published after his death Les oeuvres françoises du P. Yves de Paris (Paris, 1675); Les oeuvres françoises du P. Yves de Paris, II, ed. Alphonse de Chartres OFMCap (Paris, 1680). A third, announced volume never appeared.

See also: Julien-Eymard d'Angers, Yves de Paris: introduction et choix de textes (Paris, 1965).

literature

Julien-Eymard d'Angers, `Le P. Yves de Paris et le sentiment de Dieu', Études Franciscaines, 49 (1937), 582-631; Idem, ‘Un livre curieux de la bibliothèque Municipale de Rennes. L'Astrologiae Nova Methodus du P. Yves de Paris (1593-1678)’, Annales de Bretagne 44 (1937), 46-57; Idem, Le P. Yves de Paris et son temps (1590-1618), 2 Vols. (Paris, 1946); L. Thorndike, ‘Newness and Craving for Novelty in Seventeenth-Century Science and Medicine’, Journal of the History of Ideas 12 (1951), 584-598; Julien-Eymard d'Angers, ‘Les trente dernières années d'une vie laborieuse: le P. Ives de Paris’, Amis St-Franc 8 (1967), 63-74; Idem, L'humanisme chrétien au XVIIe siècle: Saint François de Sales et Yves de Paris (Den Haag, 1970); Idem, ‘Yves de Paris et les Provinciales’, Bulletin de l'Association Guillaume Budé 4th ser. 1 (1971), 103-110; C. Vasoli, ‘Il ‘Digestum sapientiae’ di Yves di Parigi’, Rivista Filos. Neo-scol. 70 (1978), 245-265; R.L. Fastigi, The Natural Awareness of God According to `La théologie naturelle' of Yves de Paris, Ph.D. Fordham Univ. (Fordham, 1986); Robert L. Fastigi, The Natural Theology of Yves de Paris (Atlanta, 1991); B. Chédozeau, `Yves de Paris', Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 1566-1576; C. Bérubé, L’amour de Dieu selon Jean Duns Scot, Porète, Eckhart, Benoît de Canfiel et les Capucins, Bibliotheca Seraphico-Cappuccina 53 (Rome, 1997); J. Halbronn, Ives de Paris., un capucin astrologue, http://cura.free.fr/xx/17halb10.html [consulted on 09 January 2008]; Jan Bernd Elpert, ‘Kein Bruder soll sich anmassen, ein eigentliches Studium zu verfolgen. Die Kapuziner und die Philosophie – ein Streifzug durch die intellektuelle, philosophische Entwicklung des Kapuzinerordens im 16. und frühen 17. Jahrhunderts’, in: Sol et homo. Mensch und Natur in der Renaissance. Festschrift zum 70. Geburtstag für Eckhard Keßler, ed. Sabrina Ebbersmeyer, Helga Pirner-Pareschi & Thomas Ricklin (Munich: Wilhelm Fink, 2008), 349-393 (esp. 366-378); Jan Bernd Elpert, ‘Die Schöpfung ist schön. Yves de Paris (1588-1678) der vergessene Bewunderer des Universums’, Wissenschaft & Weisheit 74 (2011), 105-134.

 

 

 

 

Zacharias Boccardi (Zaccharia Boccardi di Sicignano, d. 1760-1833)

OFMCap. Joined the order in the Salerno province in 1776. Active as lector, provincial minister, general definitor (1824) and general procurator (1825). Appointed bishop of Crotone in May 1829, yet he was unable to take his see due to illness. He died in Salerno on April 7, 1833. Known to have written a preaching handbook and other works.

editions

Metodo teorico-pratico di comporre Prediche secondo le regole della vera Eloquenza (Naples, 1802).

literature

Bullarium OFMCap IX, 382, 384 & X, 6; Ritratti dei Cappuccini Illustri II, 59; Dizionario degli illustri Salernitani (1937), 125; DHGE IX, 305; Lexicon Capuccinum 232, 533.

 

 

 

 

Zacharia Lexoviensi (Zacharie de Lisieux/Ange Lambert/Petrus Firmianus (pseudonym)/Louis Fontaines/Louys Fontaines, sieur de Saint Marcel (pseudonym), 1596-1661)

OFMCap. Born as Ange Lambert in a well-to-to family in Normandy, he joined the Capuchin order in 1612 and became a renowned preacher, who even preached before Louis XIII. Also spent nearly 20 years as a (clandestine) missionary in England in the 1630s amnd 1640s. he died in Evreux on November 10, 1661. He was a rather prolific writer, sometimes publishing under pseudonym (Pierre Firmian/Petrus Firmianus/Louis Fontaines/Louys Fontaines, sieur de Saint Marcel). His most famous work is probably the Relation du pays de Jansénie from 1664. He was a friend of Yves de Paris and like him an adversary of Jansenism, albeit with a more satyrical tone.

editions

De la Monarchie du Verbe incarné, ou de l'Immense pouvoir du plus grand des Roys, des hautes maximes politiques et du merveilleux ordre qu'il observe dans le gouvernement de son Estat, par le R. P. Zacharie de Lyzieux, prédicateur capucin (Paris: Chez la Veusve Nicolas Buon, 1639/1642/1649). The 1639 edition is available in digital format via the Bibliothèque Nationale de France.

La Philosophie chrestienne, ou Persuasions puissantes au mespris de la vie, par le P. Zacharie de Lyzieux, prédicateur capucin (Paris: Chez la Veusve Nicolas Bvon, 1639/1644). Does a 1632 edition also exist, as suggested in the Lexicon Capuccinum?

Saeculi genius Petro Firmian authore (Paris: s.n., 1653/Paris: apud viduam et D. Thierry, 1659/ 1663). This work was issued under the pseudonym Pierre Firmian.

Somnia Sapientis, Petro Firmiano authore (Paris: D. Thierry, 1659). Translated as: Les Songes du Sage, de P. Firmian. Traduits par le P. Antoine de Paris, prédicateur capucin (Paris: Chez la Veuue Denis Thierry ruë Saint Iacques, à l'enseigne S. Denis, pres Saint Yues, 1664).

Gyges Gallus. Petro Firmiano authore. Accessere Somnia sapientis. (Paris: apud viduam & Dionysium Thierry, 1658/1659/1660/1663/1671/Regensburg: Lentz, 1736). A French edition appeared as: Le Gyges gallus de P. Firmian, traduit par le P. Antoine de Paris (Paris : D. Thierry, 1663).

Petri Firmiani Opuscula, quibus continentur Gyges Gallus, Somnia sapientis, & Sæculi genius. Accessere indices rerum copiosissimi. Editio correctissima. Iuxta exemplar parisinum (Paris: Gedani, 1686).

Relation du pays de Jansénie, où il est traitté des singularitez qui s'y trouvent, des coustumes, mœurs et religion de ses habitans, par Louys Fontaines, sieur de Saint Marcel (Paris: Chez la Veusue & Denys Thierry ... et au Palais, chez Claude Barbin, 1660/1664/1665/1688). Both the 1660 and the 1665 edition are available via Google Books, and at least one of them is accessible via the databases of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France. A new edition, revised and augmented by Jesuits, it would seem, and issued in 1688, is called L'Anti-phantome du jansénisme, ou la Nouvelle description du païs de Jansénie avec ses confins, la Calvinie, la Libertinie, la Désespérie et la mer Prolyse ou Mer de Présomption, le tout représenté dans une carte générale de ces quatre provinces avec son explication, où il est traitté des singularitez qui s'y trouvent, des coutumes, mœurs et de la religion des habitans (Paris: chez A. Novateur, 1688). The Relation was also quickly translated into English, see: A Relation of the Country of Jansenia: Wherein is Treated of the Singularities Founded Therein, the Customes, Manners, and Religion of It's Inhabitants. With a Map of the Countrey (London: Printed for the author, & are sold by A. Banks and C. Harper, 1668).

Tota Pauli scientia, Christus patiens, contemplationis christianae novum opus et ad gustum concionum. Accessit Sylva sacrorum, varii argumenti multiplicem theologiam continens, authore Patre Zacharia Lexoviensi (1662/Venice: Aloysius Pavinus/Luigi Pavini, 1696/Augsburg: Georg Schlüter & Martin Happach, 1716). This work was re-issued as Tota Pauli Scientia, Christus Patiens: Contemplationis Christianae Novum Opus, Et Ad Gustum Concionum. Accessit Sylva Sacrorum, Varii Argumenti Multiplicem Theologiam Continens (Nabu Press, May 13 2012).

Sylva sacrorum, varii argumenti et continens (Venice, 1696).

See also: Zacharie de Lisieux & Johann Georg Rinck, Neu entdeckte frantzösische Staats-Larve : bestehend in allerhand schönen Reden, Sinnreichen, Spruchen und curiösen Historien (Leipzig: Gedruckt bey Johann Wilhelm Krügern, 1698); Der französische Gyges Oder Unsichtbare Charmion, Das ist Uberauß selzame und anmuhtige in Franckreich sich zugetragene Begebenheiten: Bestehend In allerhand Sinnreichen Bildern, holdseeligen Discursen, schönen politischen Erinnerungen, und andern erbaulichen Materien (Cosmopoli, 1687).

literature

Édouard d’Alençon, Les Capucins de Rouens (Paris, 1890), 47-53; Ch. Guery, Les oeuvres satiriques du P. Zacharie de Lisieux (Évreux, 1911); Julien-Eymard d’Angers, ‘Sénèque et le stoïcisme chez les Capucins français du XVIIe siècle’, Études Franciscaines n.s. 1 (1950), 337-353; Lexicon Capuccinum (Rome, 1951), 1852-1853; W.-Ch. van Dijk, ‘Zacharie de Lisieux’, DSpir XVI, 1583-1586.

 

 

 

 

Zacharias de Salò (d. 1705)

OFMCap. from the Bressanone province. Missionary in the Valla Reatina region.

editions

La lucerna sopra il Candeliere accesa con la quale si mostra nella Rhezia la continua serie della fede cattolica e apostolica romana, 2 Vols. (Venice: 1679-1690). A revised edition was issued in 1685.

Cevociusas canzuns... (Combel, 1695).

Spieghel de devotiun.. (Verona, 1665/Bolzano, 1676).

Literature

'Eine Sammlung religiöser Volkslieder durch einen Kapuziner der rätischen Mission', Sankt Fidelis 29 (1942), 24-25; Lexicon Capuccinum (Rome, 1951), 1854; I. de Villapadierna, `Zacharie de Salò', Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 1586-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zacharias de Saluzzo (Zaccaria Boverio/Zacharias a Saluzzo, d. 1638)

OFMCap. Born at Saluzzo (Piedmonte) in 1568. Trained in Latin and Greek, as well as in Law. He entered the Capuchin order in the Alexandria convent in 1590 after obtaining the doctorate in Law. He took his profession on 9 June 1591. After his ordination he became active as an anti-Protestant misionary (esp. 1601-1603). In 1619, he became a member of the Piedmonte province. Provincial definitor and guardian of the Mondovi convent in 1621. That same year, Zaccaria became a consultant for the minister general Clement de Noto, following the latter to Rome and to Spain. At Madrid, Zaccaria was involved with the conversion process of the future King of England, Charles I. In 1624, Zaccaria took on work for the Congregatio de Propaganda Fidei. In 1625-1626, he was a counsellor for cardinal Francesco Barberini (travelling to France and Spain), and in 1627 he was asked to become the official chronicler of the Capuchin order. In 1637, he was made general definitor. In the course of his life, Zaccaria wrote a substantial number of works. Most famous nowadays are his Annales, which try to prove, over against the Observants, that the Capuchins were the ‘true sons’ of Francis of Assisi. This lead to Observant reactions. For his own Annales, the first volume of which appeared in 1632, Zaccaria made abundant use of the (partly unedited) chronicles and annals by Mario da Mercato Saraceno, Bernardino da Colpetrazzo, Mattia Bellintani and Paolo da Foligno.

manuscripts

Responsio ad Quatuor Controversias super Rebus Fidei ab Anglis Propositas: Turin, Archivio Nazionale>>

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editions

Demonstrationes Symbolorum Verae et Falsae Religionis, Adversus Praecipuos ac Vigentes Catholicae Religionis, Hostes, Atheistas, Judaeos, Haereticos, Praesertim Lutheranos et Calvinistas, 2 Vols. (Lyon, 1617). Partly reprinted in Roccaberti’s Bibliotheca Maxima Pontificia, XX (Rome, 1699), 478-597.

Paraenesis Catholica ad Marcam Antonium de Dominis, Olim Archiepiscopum Spalatensem (…) in Qua Examinantur et Refelluntur Quatuor Libri ab Eodem Auctore Evulgati, Qui ‘De Republica Ecclesiastica’ Inscribuntur (Lyon, 1618). This work was re-edited three years later in an enlarged form: Censura Paraenetica in Quatuor Libros ‘De Republica Ecclesiastica’ M. A. de Dominis (Milan, 1621), which included also the Censura in Tractatum de Legitima Cardinalium Creatione Dominici Veneti Episcopi Torcellani Nomine Inscriptum, sed ab Eodem Marco Antonio de Dominis in Lucem Editum, which was also edited separately in 1622.

Orthodoxia Consultatio de Ratione Verae Fidei et Religionis Amplectendae, ad Ser. Carolum Walliae Principem, Jacobi I Magnae Britanniae Regis Filium ac Regni Successorem Iuratum in Suo in Hispanias Adventu (Madrid, 1623/Cologne , 1626/Rome, 1635). Cf. G. Albion, Charles Ist and the Court of Rome (Louvain, 1925), esp. 1-35.

Directorium Fori Iudicalis pro Regularibus Usui Fratrum Minorum qui vulgo Capuccini Nuncupantur (Turin, 1624).

De Sacris Ritibus Iuxta Romanam Regulam Usui Fratrum Minorum Capuccinorum Accommodatis (Naples, 1626).

De vera habitus forma a Seraphico B.P. Francisco instituta. See the 2017 study of Alejandra Concha Sahli mentioned below.

Annalium seu sacrarum historiarum Ordinis Minorum S. Francisci qui capuccini nuncupantur tomus primus, in quo universa quae ed ejusdem Ordinis ortum et progressum usque ad annum 1580 fidelissime traduntur (Lyon, 1632).

Annalium seu sacrarum historiarum Ordinis Minorum S. Francisci qui capuccini nuncupantur tomus secundus, in quo universa, quae ad eiusdem ordinis progressum usque ad annum 1612 spectant, fidelissime traduntur (Lyon, 1639).

Boverio’s Annales soon received Italian, French and Spanish translations. The first Italian translation appeared as: Annali de’ Frati Minori Cappuccini composti dal M.R.P. Zaccaria Boerio da Saluzzo, trans. Benedetto Senbenedetti da Milano, 2 Vols. (Turin, 1641/Venice, 1643-1645). French and Spanish translations were made by Antoine Caluze (1675) and Gabriele de Moncada (3 Vols., Madrid, 1644). Subsequent Capuchin authors provided continuations of Zaccaria’s Annales (a.o. Marcellino da Pisa). The Observants reacted against Zaccaria’s works with J. De Riddere’s Speculum Fratrum Minorum Ordinis S. Francisci (Antwerp, 1640 & 1653), which in turn gave rise to Capuchin defenses: Carolus Arenbergensis, Clypeus Seraphicus sive Scutum Veritatis in Defensionem Annalium (Cologne, 1643) and Marco Antonio Galizio, Dilucidatio Speculi Apologetici sive Propugnaculum Historiae Annalium P.Z. Boverii (Antwerp, 1653).

literature

Francesco da Sestri, Vita del P. Zaccaria Boverio (Genoa, 1664); Bernardo di Bologna, Bibliotheca Scriptorum Ordinis Minorum Capuccinorum (Venice, 1747), 248-250; Analecta Ordinis Minorum Capuccinorum 6 (1890), 68, 101, 136, 166, 9 (1893), 362, 10 (1894), 283-288; F.-X. Molfino, I cappuccini Genovesi, I: Note biografiche (Genoa, 1912), 90-93, 312, 409-414, 478-479; Cuthbert, The Capuchins. A contribution to the history of the Counter-Reformation (London, 1928) II, 431-433; Édouard d’Alençon, ‘Boverius’, DThCat II, 1119-1121; A. Teetaert, ‘Boverio’, DHGE X, 292-294; Melchior a Pobladura, Historia generalis Ordinis Fratrum Minorum Capuccinorum. Pars Secunda (1619-1761) (Rome, 1948) I, 433-440; Lexicon Capuccinum (Rome, 1951), 1851-1852; Melchior a Pobladura, ‘De cooperatoribus in compositione Annalium Ordinis Fratrum Minorum Capuccinorum’, Collectanea Franciscana 26 (1956), 9-47; Melchior a Pobladura, ‘De prima versione italica ‘Annalium’ Zachariae Boverii Salutiensis hucusque inedita’, Collectanea Franciscana 25 (1955), 305-312; Mariano D’Alatri, ‘San Francesco negli Annali del Boverio’, in: Francesco nella Storia, ed. S. Gieben (Assisi, 1982), II, 135-147; C. Pantanella, ‘Notizie di alcune antiche immagini francescane italiane da un trattato del frate minore cappuccino Zaccaria Boverio’, in: Bilanzio e l’Occidente: arte, archeologia, storia. Studi in onore di Fernando de’ Maffei (Rome: Viella, 1996); Oktavian Schmucki, ‘Zacharias v. Saluzzo’, LThK3 X, 1362f; Johannes Madez, ‘Zacharias Boverius von Saluzzo’ [cap. † 1638], in: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XVII, 1579f.; Policarpo Felipe Alonso, ‘La identidad capuchina en los Anales de Zacarías Boverio (1524-1556, I parte)’, Naturaleza y Gracia 49 (2002), 7-126, 199-264; Gianluca Crudo, 'Padre Zaccaria Boverio da Saluzzo e le sue Annotazioni sui Frati Cappuccini della Calabria [1525-1612]', Italia Francescana 85 (2010), 499-530;

Alejandra Concha Sahli, 'The True Habit of St. Francis: The Capuchins and the Construction of a New Franciscan Identity', Collectanea Francescana 87 (2017), 513-552.

 

 

 

Zacharias Kirchgesser (fl. first half 17th cent.)

OFM. German friar active in the Münster area during the 30 years war.

literature 

Manfred Becker-Huberti, ‘‘Von jetziger grausamer Veränderung in Deutschland’. Vier Münsteraner Barockpredigten des Minoriten P. Zacharias Kirchesser aus der Zeit des Dreißigjährigen Krieges und ein ‘Fürstenspiegel’ von Antonius de Guevara’, in: Kirche und Frömmigkeit in Westfalen. Gedenkschrift für Alois Schöer, ed. Reimund Haas & Bernhard Jüstel, Westfalia Sacra, 12 (Münster: Aschendorff, 2002), 51-83.

 

 

 

 

Zacharias Mediolanensis (d. 1675)

OFMCap. Active in Milan as preacher, guardian, master of the novices and several times also as provincial definitor.

editions

Il giovane capuccino brievemente instrutto (Milan, 1646)

literature

I.de Villapadierna, `Zacharie de Milan', Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 1586.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zacharias Tevo (Zaccaria Tevo, 1651-1711)

OFMConv. Composer and music pedagogue, known for his Il musico testore.

editions

Compieta a otto voci piena (Venezia, 1687).

Il musico testore (Venice: Antonio Bortoli, 1706). Available via Google Books.

literature

Barocco padano e musici francescani: L’apporto dei maestri conventuali. Atti del XVI Convegno internazionale sul barocco padano (secoli XVII-XVIII), Padova 1-3 luglio 2013, ed. Alberto Colzani, Andrea Luppi & Maurizio Padoan, Barocco Padano, 8/Centro Studi Antoniani, 55 (Padua: Associazione Centro Studi Antoniani, 2014). Review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:1-2 (2015), 352-354.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zapata de Cárdenas (ca. 1510-1590)

OFMObs.

literature

Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XV, 1555.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zegers (Nikolaas Tacitus Zegers/Claes Zegers, ca. 1495-1559)

OFMObs. Born in Brussels around 1495. Studied at the University of Louvain (matriculation in 1512). Entered the Observant branch of the Franciscan order in 1520, in the Germania Inferior province. Between 1536/1537 and 1548, he taught Sacred Scripture as regent master of the Franciscan Studium Theologicum at Louvain (succeeding Franciscus Titelmans). After 1548, when Adam Sasbout took over the lectorate position in Louvain, Nicholas Zegers subsequently lived (frequently as guardian or vicarius, his apparently precaious health notwithstanding) in the convents of Mechelen (Malines), Tienen (Tirlemont, 1550-1551), Diest (1553-1554), Amsterdam (1555-1556), Boetendaal near Brussels (1557), Brussels (1557), and Louvain (1558-1559, where his brother Egidius was guardian at the time), where he died on 27 August 1559. He is the author of a varied oeuvre, mopstly completed after his lectorate years. Between 1555 and his death, Nicholas published several works on the New Testament (Scholia and Epanorthotes). In these works, he defended the Latin Vulgate against some of the new translations (of Erasmus and others), yet did propose textual corrections in orer to arrive at a more or less definite Latin New Testament. Beside these theological works, Nicholas Zegers published since 1548 a range of editions and translations of important spiritual and catechetical works. He also published a biblical concordance. On top of these biblical works, which eventually were also used by Protestants and as such were included in the famous Protestant Critici Sacri collections of 1660 and 1698, he published two volumes of edifying proverbs, namely the Proverbia Teutonica Latinitate Donata (Antwerp, 1550), and the Proverbia Gallicana (Antwerp, 1554), and he translated (into Latin and into Dutch) important devotional works.

manuscripts and editions

Latin translation of Florenius of Haarlem (Cartusian)'s, Wech des Levens, ed. & trans. Niklaas van Winghe (Antwerp, 1442/Antwerp, 1544Antwerp, 1547/Antwerp. 1552/Antwerp, 1564). Zegers published a Latin translation of this work as Via Vitae (Antwerp: Joannes Loëus, 1551/Antwerp: Joannes Loëus, 1556). [the original work had been written for female religious. Zegers changed the style and also several of the prayers (not including many specific monastic prayers) to make it suitable for a well-educated international Latin reading public].

Latin translation of the Speghel des kersten Levens of Thomas of Herenthals (d. 1530). Zegers' translation appeared as: Christianae Vitae Speculum (Antwerp: Simon Cock, 1549-1550/Cologne: Arnold Birckmann, 1555).

In 1554, Zegers also helped to publish a new vernacular edition of Thomas Herentals’ Speghel des Kersten Leven. This edition went in press with the title Den Spieghel des Christen Levens (Antwerp: Simon Cock, 1554), and was reprinted the same year and in 1569 (Antwerp: Simon Cock, 1554/Antwerp: Willem van Parijs, 1569). Zegers added several appendices (indices etc.) as well as a short treatise on the Ten Commandments, sin, confession, prayer, the ave maria prayer, the ceremonies and parts of the eucharist, and with additional prayers.

Proverbia Teutonica Latinitate Donata, collectore et interprete T. Nicolao Zegero (Antwerp: J. Loëus, 1551/ Antwerp: J. Loëus, 1553/ Antwerp: J. Loëus, 1554/ Antwerp: J. Loëus, 1558/ Antwerp: J. Loëus,1563/Antwerp: J. Loëus, 1571). [Collection of ca. 700 proverbs, with their Latin and Greek pendants, possibly written to provide an alternative to Erasmus's Adagia. Between the Praefatio and the proverbs properly speaking can be found a Proverbiorum commendatio and a Proverbiis quatenus sit utendum, which clearly show an Erasmian inspiration. Editions from 1558 onwards have proper editions and additional laudatory poems by the Luxemburg humanist Nicolaes Mameranus and Antonius Hovaeus (abbot of Egmond Abbey)]

Dutch translation of the Bouclier de la Foy (1548) of Nicole Grenier (Victorine). This translation appeared as: Den Beuckelere des Gheloofs (Louvain: Anthonis Maria Bergaigne voor Jan Waen, 1551/Antwerp: Pieter van Keerberghen, 1566/Antwerp: Pieter van Keerberghen, 1568/Antwerp: Mathias Rodius voor Hendrik Wouters, 1581). [a treatise on the doctrines and the practices of a good religious life, put forward in a dialogue between ‘die rechte wandelere’ and the ‘dolende.’]

Proverbia Gallicana, una cum interpretatione Teutonica tum Latina (Antwerp: J. Loëus, 1554) [Comparison of Dutch and French proverbs. Predominantly meant for language study.]

Dutch translation of the Collège de Sapience (1539) of Pierre Doré OP. This translation of Zegers appeared as: Die Collegie der Wijsheyt, ghefundeert ende ghesticht in die universiteyt der deuchden (Amsterdam: Simon Cock, 1556). Zegers devoted the book on October 7, 1555 to abbes Maria van Linghen (abbess of Ter Kameren in Brussels and sister of Jan van Linghen, Count of Arenberg).

Dutch translation of the L’espée de la Foy (1557) of Nicole Grenier (Victorine). This translation of Zegers appeared as: Het Sweert des Gheloofs, om te beschermen die Christen Kercke teghen die vyanden des waerheyts, ghetogen uut die heylige scrifture, uut die heylige Concilien ende uut die alderoutste Vaders ende Doctoren der heiliger Kercken, Gemaect in Fransoysce tale van B. Nicolaes Grenier, Religioos van S. Victors. Ende overgestelt in duytsce, nu int licht ghebrocht doer B. Henrick Pippinck Minister Provinciael der Nederduyts landen. Ghededicteert aen de Vrome heeren ende ghemeynte der Stadt van Antwerpen uut liefde (Antwerp, 1558/Antwerp: Jan van Ghelen, 1568). This amounts to a catholic apology. Although the title mentions Henrick Pippinck, the introductory words of the latter indicate that the translation was done by another, deceased friar, and this translator should be identified with Zegers.

Dutch translation of the Catechism/Summa doctrinae christianae per quaestiones traditae of Petrus Canisius. This translation, which Zegers finished in Boetendaal, appeared as: Catechismus, dat is die Somme der christelijcker onderwijsinghen (Antwerp: Pieter van Keerberghen, 1558/Antwerpen: J. Verwithagen, 1565). [Zegers was not the first translator of Canisius’ Summa Doctrinae Christianae per Quaestiones Traditae. The first Dutch translation (by Jan van Hemert), appeared in Antwerp by Verwithagen & Simon Cock in 1557.]

Scholion in Omnes Novi Testamenti Libros, III Vols. (Cologne: Heredes Arnoldi Birckmanni, 1553/etc.). This work, a commentary on difficult places in the New Testament, was later incorporated in the Critici Sacri, sive Doctissimorum Virorum in SS. Biblia Annotationes et Tractatus,, ed. John Pearson et al., 9 Vols. (London: Jac. Flesher, 1660), Vols. VI-VII & Critici Sacri, sive Doctissimorum Virorum in SS. Biblia Annotationes et Tractatus,, ed. Henricus et Vidua Theodori Boom, 9 Vols. (Amsterdam: J. Boom, 1698), Vols. VI, VII & VIII.

Epanorthotes. Castigationes in Novum Testamentum, in quibus depravata restituuntur, adiecta resecantur et sublata addiciuntur (Cologne: Heredes Arnoldi Birckmanni, 1553). This work, Zegers's attempt at creating a more or less 'definite' correction of the Latin NT text, based on proper philological studies of old sources and comparisons with the works of Valla, Erasmus and Titelmans. It was later incorporated in the Critici Sacri, sive Doctissimorum Virorum in SS. Biblia Annotationes et Tractatus,, ed. John Pearson et al., 9 Vols. (London: Jac. Flesher, 1660), Vols. VI-VII & Critici Sacri, sive Doctissimorum Virorum in SS. Biblia Annotationes et Tractatus,, ed. Henricus et Vidua Theodori Boom, 9 Vols. (Amsterdam: J. Boom, 1698), Vols. VI, VII & VIII.

Novum Jesu Christi Testamentum juxta veterem Ecclesiae editionem, ex probatissimis eisdem vetustissimis tum Scriptoribus tum exemplaribus priscae suae fidei integrati restututum, brevibusque illustratum Adnotationibus, 2 Vols. (Louvain: Stephanus Valerius, 1559). Building on the Epanorthotes, this was Zegers's attempt at creating a more or less final NT text in answer to Erasmus's Novum Instrumentum. Zegares had sent a manuscript version of the work to Pope Julius III and even suggested in his address to the pope (Julius III or his successor Paul IV) to make his NT version the only accepted version in the Church. What the impact of Zegers's work was on further Catholic Vulgate editions needs further research.

Inventarium in Novum Testamentum (Antwerp: Joannes Latius, 1557/1558/Antwerp: Joannes Bellerius, 1566). This is a biblical concordance for preachers and theologians, finished by Zegers in Amsterdam on August 6, 1556, possibly to replace Anthony of Koenigsteyn's concordance, and informed by Zegers's own scriptural research.

Versus memoriales in IVuor Christi Evangelia: MS Mons, Bibliothèque Publique, 403. The seventeenth-century manuscript copy of the work shows it amounts to a mnemotechnic aid to learn by heart the chapter order of the four Gospels.

For more information on all these works, see also the studies of Benjamin De Troeyer mentioned below.

literature

S. Dirks, Histoire littéraire des Frères Mineurs des Pays Bas (Antwerp, 1885), 81-84; W. Schmitz, Het aandeel der minderbroeders, 104-105, 111, 113; P.J.M. Van Gils, ‘Proverbia teutonica Latinitate Donata, een spreekwoordenboekje van T. Nicolaas Zegers’, Tijdschrift voor Taal en Letteren (1941), 137-142; Benjamin De Troeyer, ‘De minderbroeder Nikolaas Zegers’, Franciscana 18 (1963), 8-29; Benjamin De Troeyer, Bio-Bibliographia Franciscana Neerlandica Saeculi XVI (Nieuwkoop, 1969-1970), I, 192-203 & II, 407-422; André Derville, `Zegers', Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 1611-1612.

 

 

 

 

Zenobius Bocchi (Zenobio Bocchi, fl. early 17th cent.)

Observant friar from the Florence region, Zenobio Bocchi became both a preacher and a botanical and medical specialist, focusing on the properties of medical plants. He studied under Francesco Malocchi, prefect of the botanic gardens of Pisa. Zenobio was involved with the lay-out of the Boboli gardens of Florence and with the botanical gardens in Pisa. Together with his former master Malocchi, he entered into the service of the Mantuan Gonzaga family, also at the recommendation of the painter Jacopo Ligozzi. In the gardens of the ducal palace, Zenobio Bocchi developed a special medical garden, the so-called garden dei semplici (a plan of which, including its underlying astrological principles, he published in 1603). On 6 June, 1611, Zenobio Bocchi was made ‘Soprain tendente generale a tutti li giardini ducali’.

literature

Rimando A. Zanca, ‘Giardino de' semplici in Mantova" di Zenobio Bocchi’, Quadrante Padano 2 (1981), 32-37; Rimando A. Zanca, ‘Un monogramma geometrico di Zenobio Bocchi, naturalista al servizio dei Gonzaga’, Civiltà Mantovana terza series 25:2 (??), 31-35; Raffaella Morselli, La Collezioni Gonzaga: l'elenco dei beni del 1626-1627 (Silvana Editoriale, 2000), passim; Barbara Furlotti & Guido Rebecchini, The Art of Mantua: Power and Patronage in the Renaissance (Getty Publications, 2008), passim; Valeria Finucci, The Prince's Body: Vincenzo Gonzaga and Renaissance Medicine (2015), 134.

 

 

 

 

Zénon de Bergamo (1574-1624)

OFMCap

literature

Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 1627-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zuallart (d. 1672)

literature

Dict. de Spir., 16 (1994), 1659f

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zumárraga (Juan de Zumárraga, 1468 - 1548)

OFMObs. Spanish friar. Born in Tavira de Durango (Bilbao). After some initial studies in his town of birth, Juan entered the Observants of the Santoyo province. Finished his noviciate in the San Francisco convent of Valladolid. Thereafter studied theology and canon law at the University of Valladolid. After the Santoyo province was combined with the La Aguilera custody, forming the new province of La Concepción (1518), Zumárraga became its second provincial (1520-1523). Afterward, he is found at the Recollect convent of El Abrojo (1524-1526), and became guardian of the San Francisco convent of Avila and quickly thereafter of the El Abrojo convent (1526-1528). He also fulfilled functions as inquisitor (with Andres de Olmos) in Navarra and Biscaye, and as general definitor for the La Concepción province. On 12 December 1527, Emperor Charles V appointed Juan de Zumárraga to the new episcopal see of Tenoxtitlán, or Mexico (papally confirmed by pope Clement VII in 1530), and on 10 January 1528 gave him also the function of ‘Protector of the Indians’ (a function renounced by Zumárraga in Sepember 1534). Zumárraga arrived in Mexico in December 1528. Between December 1528 and November 1532, and again between October 1534 and 1548 he was active in his diocese (covering New Spain (with the exception of Tlaxcala), Yucatán, and Guatemala), which in 1546 was freed from its suffragan status and became an archdiocese (with the dependent dioceses of Oaxaca, Michoacán, Tlaxcala, Guatemala, Chiapas, and Nueva Galicia). In 1535, Juan de Zumárraga became the first general inquisitor of New Spain on top of his episcopal duties. He kept this inquisitorial position until 1543. Zumárraga died on 3 June 1548 and was buried in the St. Peter Chapel of Mexico Cathedral. During his episcopal charge, Zumárraga was an active supporter of education for indigenous peoples (establishing schools for adults, boys and girls, as well as the famous Collegio de Santiago de Tlatelolco), and took an interest in creating a local printing press and in the formation of libraries. Although Zumárraga had a reputation as protector of the Indian people, and took action to fully emancipate baptised and doctrinally informed indigenous converts, he also is known for inquisitorial persecution of ‘idolatry’ (which lead to several executions). Zumárraga not only had to defend indigenous people against enslavement and the consequences of the encomendar practice (which, thanks to the actions of las Casas were mitigated and nearly abrogated in 1541/2), but also had to negociate between vying secular and regular clergymen and their supporters in Spain and at the papal court, which expressed itself in numerous conflicts about missionary privileges, baptism practices and religious authority over recently christianised populations. Aside from diocesan statutes (1534) and related works concerning synodal matters (1539, 1546), Zumárraga has left no less than 67 letters (covering the period between 1529 and 1548), and two doctrinal works.

editions

Statutes and related materials. See on these esp.: J. García Icazbalceta, Don Fray Juan de Zumárraga, primer obispo de Mexico, 4 Vols. (Mexico, 1947); M. Cuevas, Documentos inéditos del s. XVI para la historia de México (Mexico, 1914), 1-153; A.M. Carreño, Nuevos documentos inéditos de Don Fray Juan de Zumárraga (Mexico, 1942); A.M. Carreño, Don Fray Juan de Zumárraga, téologo y editor, humanista e inquisidor (Mexico, 1950).

Letters. See on these for instance Richard E. Greenleaf & Neal Kaveny, Zumárraga and his Family: Letters to Vizcaya, 1536-1548 (Washington, 1979). See also the studies mentioned above.

Doctrina breve muy provechosa de las cosas que pertenecen a la fe católica, Facsimile edition (New York, 1928) [This work, partly based on the doctrinal manuals of Pedro de Córdoba and Constantino Ponce de la Fuente (1543), and composed with the help of the Dominican friar Betanzos, is hailed as the first Christian doctrinal work ever produced in America. It was composed between 1543 and 1546. The first part of the work apparently did not survive. The remaining second part probably was finished after the synod of 1546. The Doctrina provides a practical introduction into catholic doctrine for secular and regular priests active in the field, dealing with the dogmas, the commandments, the sacraments, the capital, cardinal and venial sins, and the works of mercy. In this work, which repeatedly refers to Erasmus, Zumárraga also stresses the importance of allowing women to read the Gospel in the vernacular, and emphasizes that the indigenous populaation should be respected and evangelized into true Christians]

Regla cristiana breve para ordenar la vida y tiempo del cristiano que se quiere salvar y tener su alma dispuesta (Mexico, 1547); Regla cristiana breve para ordenar la vida y tiempo del cristiano que se quiere salvar y tener su alma dispuesta, ed. J. Almoina (Mexico, 1951) [Compilatory work, meant as doctrinal and spiritual guide for priests, friars, and Christian lay people. For a more detailed description, see DSpir XVI, 1664-1665.]

literature

J. de Mendieta, Historia Eclesiástica Indiana (Madrid, 1973) III, Book 5, ch. 27-30; Juan de Torquemada, Monarquía Indiana (Madrid, 1730) III, ch. 30-33; Wadding, Annales Minorum XVI (Quaracchi, 1933), 192; García Icazbalceta, Don Fray Juan de Zumárraga: Primer Obispo y Arzobispo de México, 4 Vols. (Mexico City, 1947); Fidel de J. Chauvet, Fray Juan de Zumárraga (Mexico, 1948); A.M. Carreño, Don Fray Juan de Zumárraga, téologo y editor, humanista e inquisidor (Mexico, 1950); Richard E. Greenleaf, Zumárraga and the Mexican Inquisition, 1536-1543 (Washington, 1961); Richard E. Greenleaf, Zumárraga and His Family. Letters to Vizcaya 1536-1548: A collection of documents in relation to the founding of a hospice in his birthplace (Washington: Academy of American Franciscan History, 1979); M. Mathes, Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco: La primera biblioteca académica de las Américas (Mexico, 1982); E. Mira Mira, Estudio histórico-genético de la ‘`Doctrina breve’, 1543-1544, de Juan de Zumárraga (Pamplona, 1989); F. Gil Zorrilla, Primeras ‘doctrinas’ del Nuevo Mundo. Estudio (…) de las obras de Fray Juan de Zumárraga (Rome, 1989); C.J. Alejos Grau, Carthaginensia 6 (1990), 283-293; Dict. de Spir XVI (1994), 1661-1665; María Elvira Buelna Serrano, Indígenas en la inquisición apostólica de fray Juan de Zumárraga (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, 2009).