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Telesphorus de Cosenza

Telo (d. 8 May 1292)

Tenorius Gonzalus (Tenorio Gonzalo, 1602-1682?)

Terricus (Thierry) de Saulis

Theobaldus de Narni

Theodoricus Andreae

Theodoricus Arnevelde, see: Dietrich Arnevelde (letter D)

Theodoricus Colde/Theodoricus a Monasterio, see: Dietrich Colde

Theodoricus Croata, see: Dietrich (‘Bruder Dietrich’/Dietrich von Zengg), under letter D

Theodoricus Menus de Venetiis (fl. ca. 1320)

Theodorus Foresti (Teodoro Foresti da Bergamo, d. 1637)

Theodorus Jiménez (Teodoro Jiménez, fl. c. 1800)

Theophilus Brunus de Verona (Teofilo Bruno, 1568-1638)

Theophilus Burgundus

Theophilus de Bydgoszcz, see: Modus Reponendi Sermones per Artem Memorativam (in the list of Anonymous Works)

Theophilus Veronensis (Teofilo di Verona/Bruni, d. 1638)

Thesaurus de Roma

Thidericus Struve (d. 1421)

Thomas Acerbis de Olera (1563-1631)

Thomas Belchiam (d. 1537), beatus

Thomas Bellaci

Thomas Bodwill, see: Vincentius Johannes Bapista Canes

Thomas Brookby (Thomas Brorbey, d. 1537)

Thomas Coto (Tomás Coto, fl. first half 17th cent.)

Thomas de Bergamo, see Thomas Acerbis de Olera

Thomas de Brounceston de Anglia/Thomas Broundeston/Thomas Scotus/Thomas of Braunceston (fl. first half 14th cent.)

Thomas de Bungay (fl. ca. 1275)

Thomas de Capua (d. 1239 or 1243)

Thomas de Celano (c. 1190 - c. 1260)

Thomas de Cori (1655-1729)

Thomas de Frigano (d. 1381)

Thomas de Hales (fl. ca. 1240)

Thomas de Herenthals (d. 1530)

Thomas de Jorz (d. 1310)

Thomas de Montalvo (d. 1735)

Thomas de Pavia, see: Thomas Paviensis

Thomas de Salzburg (d. 1463)

Thomas de Sancto Donato (Tommaso da San Donato in Val Comino, † 1648)

Thomas de Sancto Josepho (Tomás de San José/Tomás de Madrid, d. 1708)

Thomas de Storlitis († 1341)

Thomas de Tolentino (ca. 1260-1321)

Thomas de Whapela (d. ca. 1303)

Thomas de York (d.ca. 1260)

Thomas Dochingus (Thomas Good/d. ca. 1270)

Thomas Eboracensis

Thomas Eccleston (d. ca. 1260)

>>>check: Fray Pedro Font, Diario íntimo, y Diario de Fray Tomas Eixarch, ed. Julio César Montané Martí (México, D.F., Plaza y Valdés Editores, 2000).

Thomas Franciscus de Urrutigoiti (Tomás Francés Urrutigoiti, fl. c. 1660)

Thomas Illyricus (d. 1528)

Thomas Martini de Montefortino (Tommaso Martini da Montefortino, 1739-c. 1805)

Thomas Murner (1475-1537)

Thomas Otterbonus (late 14th - early 15th cent.)

Thomas Paviensis (Thomas Tusci, ca. 1212 - ca. 1284)

Thomas Weiss (early 16th cent.

Thomas Winchelsae (d. 1437)

Tiburcius Navarro (Tiburcio Navarro, fl. later 17th cent.)

Tomasuccio de Foligno (c. 1319-1377) beatus

Toribio de Benavente (Toribio Venavento o Motolinía, ca. 1495-1565)

Toribio de Torralba (Toribio de Torralva, fl. 17th cent.)

Trebazio Mareotti (d. 1599)

 

 



 

 



 

 



 

 

 

 

Telesphorus de Cosenza (Telesforus, Theoloforus, Theolosphorus, c. 1365-1386)

Probably a Franciscan eschatological thinker from Calabria (like his illustrious forerunner Joachim of Fiore) in the tradition of Jean de Rocquetaillade. Probably a sympathizer of the Clareni Spirituals, and at the same time a supporter of the French royal dynasty. The name 'Telesphorus' was chosen as a pseudonym, and the author claimed to be from Cosenza (Italy) and to live or have lived as a hermit near the site where once stood the ancient city of Thebes. He proclaimed in his Libellus de magnis tribulationibus et statu ecclesiae (two redactions: first one finished between 1356 and 1365, the second between 1378 and 1390) the victory of the French king in the Hundred Years War and profetized the arrival of a French angel pope. It amounts to an intruiging pastiche taken from the works of Joachim of Fiore, Jean de Rocquetaillade, the so-called Cyrillic prophecies and a range of minor works (listed in the dedicatory letter at the beginning of the work, adressed at Prince Antoniotto Adorno (1340-1398), the sixth Doge of Genoa. The Libellus suggests that the papal schism will end at Perugia in 1393, at which occasion the antipope and his followers will receive their due punishment. Following this, a short period of peace will be inaugurated, but soon the Emperor Frederick III and no less than three antipopes will start persecuting the clergy. They will imprison the French King Charles, but he will be liberated by means of a miraculous intervention. Subsequently the pastor angelicus will become pope, and under his rule the clergy will let go it their temporal possessions voluntary, and at a general council it will be declared that, from henceforth, the clergy will only use what they need to live. The German Electors will hand over their right to choose the emperor to the pope, and the pastor angelicus will crown the French King Charles as the new emperor. Together they will restore church and society to a state of original evangelical poverty and to a state of obedience to the evangelical precepts. The emperor and the pope will together launch a crusade and 'liberate' the Holy Land, converting in the aftermath the Jews, the Orthodox Christians and the infidels. For more information, see the literature below.The theologian Heinrich von Langenstein wrote a polemic reply to Telesphorus's work in 1392 (which was printed in Thesaurus anecdotorum novissimus, ed. Bernhard Pez (Augsburg, 1721-9) I, 507-64).

manuscripts

Libellus Fratris Telefori/Libellus de causis, statu, cognitione ac fine praesentis schismatis et tribulationum futurarum: MS Syracuse University von Ranke 90, ff. 2-22v; BAV, Vat. Reg. lat. 580 (written in Ferrara between 1420-1425); Milano, Trivulziana, 199 (Piacenza, 1496); Padova, Bibl. del Seminario, 83; Modena, Bibl. Estense, lat. 233; San Daniele del Friuli, Bibl. Guarneriana, 44. In all there exist ca. 50 manuscripts, containing the complete work or parts of it.

editions

Libellus de magnis tribulationibus et statu ecclesiae in proximo futuris/Libellus de causis, statu, cognitione ac fine praesentis schismatis et tribulationum futurarum (Venice, 1516)/Expositio magni prophete Joachim in librum beati Cirilli de magnis tribulationibus (Venice, 1516). These editions leave out the prophecies that had not come to pass and add illustrations and allusions to an upcoming crusade against the Ottomans.

literature

E. Donckel, ‘Studien über die Prophezeiung des Fr. Telesphorus von Cosenza, O.F.M. (1365-1386)’, Archivum Franciscanum historicum 26 (1933), 29-104, 282-314; Marjorie Reeves, The Influence of Prophecy in the Later Middle Ages (Oxford, 1969), 530-531; R. Rusconi, L’attesa della fine del tempo (Rome, 1979), 171-184; Richard Spence, ‘MS Syracuse University von Ranke 90 and the Libellus of Telesphorus of Cosenza’, Scriptorium 33 (1979), 271-74; Christine Stöllinger-Löser, ‘Telesforus von Cosenza’, Verfasserlexikon IX (1994), 679-682; Georg Kreuzer, ‘Telesphorus von Cosenza’, Biographisch-Bibliographisches Lexikon XIV (1998), 1539-1541; Paola Guerrini, Propaganda politica e profezie figurate nel tardo Medioevo (1997), passim; ‘Telesforus von Cosenza’, in: Quellenlexikon zur deutschen Literaturgeschichte. Bibliography of Studies on German Literary History. Personal- und Einzelwerkbibliographien der internationalen Sekundärliteratur 1945-1990 zur deutschen Literatur von den Anfängen bis zur Gegenwart, ed. Heiner Schmidt, Band 31: (Duisburg: Verlag für Pädagogische Dokumentation, 2002), 65; João Carlos Serafim, ‘Eremitismo, profecia e poder: o caso do ‘Libellus’ do ‘pseudo-eremita’ Telésforo de Cosenza’, Via Spiritus 9 (2002), 61-82; Paola Guerrini, ‘Escatalogia e gioachimismo in Telesforo da Cosenza’, in: Il ricordo del futuro: Gioacchino Da Fiore e il Gioachimismo attraverso la storia, ed. Fabio Troncarelli (Bari, 2006), 125-132.

 

 

 

 

Telo (d. 8 May 1292)

Portuguese friar. Assistant lector at the Franciscan convent of Burgos in 1267. Provincial minister of Castile in 1271 (until1276). Thereafter appointed archbishop of Braga.

manuscripts and editions

Constitutiones Synodales Ecclesiae Bracharensis, alterae die 5 Decembris anno 1285 alterae anno 1286 editae

Cartas (litterae)

For manuscripts and editions, see: F.L. Lopes, ‘Franciscanos portugueses predentinos. Escritores, mestres e leitores’, Repertorio de Historia de las Ciencias Eclesiasticas en España 7 (Siglos III-XVI) (Salamanca, 1979), 460-461.

literature

M.A. Pereira da Silva, D. Frei Telo, arcebispo de Braga (1278-1292), Diss. (Coimbra, 1965); I. da Rosa Pereira, ‘Sínodos medievais portugueses’, in: Proceedings of the Second International Congress of Medieval Canon Law (Vatican City, 1965), 457-466; A.D. de Sousa Costa, Monumenta Portugaliae Vaticana (Rome-Porto, 1968) I, CCCLXXXVII-XCI ; F.L. Lopes, ‘Franciscanos portugueses predentinos. Escritores, mestres e leitores’, Repertorio de Historia de las Ciencias Eclesiasticas en España 7 (Siglos III-XVI) (Salamanca, 1979), 460-461.

 

 

 

 

Tenorius Gonzalus (Tenorio Gonzalo, 1602-1682?)

OFM.

literature

Horst von der Bey, ‘Tenorio Gonzalo’, Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart, 4th ed. VIII, 161f.

 

 

 

 

Terricus (Thierry) de Saulis

Preached in Paris in 1283.

manuscripts

Sermo de tempore: Paris Nat Lat 14947 f.116va

literature

Sbaralea, Suppl., III, 668; Schneyer, V, 519

 

 

 

 

Theobaldus de Narni

Franciscan theologian. Famous for his Compendium Sententiarum (relationship with comparable works of Anthonius Andrea?)

manuscripts

Brevis Sententia Libri Sententiarum: Assisi 191, f. 1r-61v; Padua Univ. 1415 f. 107r-16v; Rome Angelica 1174; Vat, Barber (??) 493; Naples, Naz. VIII.A.5; Naples, Naz.VII.D.29 ff. 21r-74v [f. 74r: `Explicit brevis compillatio, compillata per fr. Theobaldum de Narnio, tunc lectorem Romanum, super omnes libros Sententiarum.' See: Cenci, Napoli]

literature

Stegmüller, RS, 1349(?); Doucet, AFH 47 (1954), 169

 

 

 

 

Theodoricus Andreae

Spanish Friar Minor. Author of commentaries on the Physica and the Metaphysica of Aristotle. He also would have written an Expositio in Apocalypsim.

editions

literature

Wadding, Scriptores, 213.

 

 

 

 

Theodoricus Menus de Venetiis (fl. ca. 1320)

Franciscan preacher

manuscripts

?

literature

Fabricius VI, 230;

 

 

 

 

Theodorus Foresti (Teodoro Foresti da Bergamo, d. 1637)

OFMCap. Born in Solto Collona. Joined the Capuchin order in Lombardy, Preacher and Theologian. Fulfilled several teaching and administrative charges for his order. Was provincial definitor in the Venice province, but was exiled by the Venetian government when he defended the papacy in a conflict with the Venetian Republic (1626). In 1633 general definitor and shortly therafter apostolic visitator for Urban VIII.

editions

De almae ac sanctissimae Trinitatis mysterio in Seraph. D. Bonaventuram cardinalem Ordinis Minorum paraphrases, commentaria et disputationes: quibus praeter diligentem textus et verborum expositionem divinarum litterarum locis Sanctorum Patrum assertis perpetuo fere cum D. Thomae asensu Seraphica doctrina illustratur et sustinetur: additur in fine ex eisdem Seraphico et Angelico doctoribus de modis dicendi in hoc divino Mysterio tractatus cum quadruplici indice I. Locorum Divinae Scripturae; II. Articolorum et Disputationum; III. Rerum notabilium; Earumdem rerum ad Conciones deservientium (Rome: Ex typographia Iacobi Mascardi, 1633).

literature

Giancrisostomo da Cittadella, ‘Cenni sconosciuti della vita del P. Teodoro Foresti da Bergamo’, Collectanea Franciscana 16 (1946), 201-214.

 

 

 

 

Theodorus Jiménez (Teodoro Jiménez, fl. c. 1800)

OFM. Scotist theologian in the Cartagena province.

literature

AIA 38 (1935), 100; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 131 (no. 448).

 

 

 

 

Theophilus Brunus de Verona (Teofilo Bruno, 1568-1638)

OFMCap. Mathematician and astronomer.

literature

Lexicon Capuccinum, 1692.

 

 

 

 

Theophilus Burgundus

Franciscan inquisitor. Author of a Commentaria in Septem Visiones Apocalypseos.

editions

literature

Wadding, Scriptores, 214; Stegmüller, RB V, 8016.

 

 

 

 

Theophilus Veronensis (Teofilo di Verona/Bruni, d. 1638)

OFMCap. Member of the Venetian province. Astronomer.

literature

Lexicon Capuccinum (1951), 142.

 

 

 

 

Thesaurus de Roma (Santi Tesauro da Roma)

OFMCap.

editions

Esposizione sopra la Regola del Serafico Padre S. Francesco, in: I Frati Cappuccini I, 1126-1159.

 

 

 

 

Thidericus Struve (d. 1421)

Friar from Northern Germany. Known to be lector secundarius (1413-1415) in Erfurt. In1414, during a sejourn in Hildesheim, he made a Latin translation of the Hiob treatise of Marquard von Lindau. In 1416, he acquired in Dresden a manuscript with the Ecclesiasticus commentary of Robert Holcot [now MS Braunschweig StB 98]. According to the Franciscan chronicler Nicholas Glasberger, Thidericus was elected provincial minister of Saxony in 1421, only to die twelve days later. Aside from his translation of Marquard’s Hiob treatise, Thidericus probably translated another treatise of Marquard (namely the part ‘Von den Seelen’ from Marquard’s Decalogue treatise,translated as: Tractatus de Animabus[?] Decedentibus ad Purgatorium), which has survived in the same manuscript. Moreover, he produced several other works in the context of his teaching obligations at the Erfurt studium. These latter writings have survived in MS Hannover Landeskirchlichen Archiv D 10 Nr. 1 (PfA Bissendorf HS 20). Together with the Franciscan lector Johan Reyneke, Thidericus also composed a treatise De discordia inter prelatos et religiosos.This treatise deals both in Latin and in German from a canon law perspective with major points of conflict over confession rights between the secular and the regular clergy.

manuscripts

Hiob treatise translation [translatus in latinum et extensus per fratrem thedericum struven]: MS Wroclaw, (Breslau) UB cod. I F 243 (c. 1440) ff. 182v-192v.

Tractatus de animabus [?] decedentibus ad purgatorium: MS Wroclaw, UB cod. I F 243 (c. 1440) ff. 235v-238v.

Radices scripturarum: MS Hannover, Landeskirchlichen Archiv D 10 Nr. 1 (PfA Bissendorf HS 20) ff. 178r-186r. [=alphabetically ordered excerpts from Joachimof Fiore’s De semine scripturarum. Cf. also Stegmüller, Rep. Bib. 4033-4034]

De numeris: MS Hannover, Landeskirchlichen Archiv D 10 Nr. 1 (PfA Bissendorf HS 20) ff. 186r-195v [inc: Quanta sit vis in numeris noverant hii…

De libro de amicitia seu de amicitiae isagogia: MS Hannover, Landeskirchlichen Archiv D 10 Nr. 1 (PfA Bissendorf HS 20) ff. 195v-197v [=Excerpts from Eilbert of Bremen’s Liber de amicitia seu de amicitiae isagogi]

De quinque impedimentis scientiae: MS Hannover Landeskirchlichen Archiv D 10 Nr. 1 (PfA Bissendorf HS 20) ff. 197v-199v [= excerpts from De quinque impedimentis scientiae of Eilbert of Bremen]

De discordia inter prelatos et religiosos: MS Hildesheim, Dombibliothek 672 ff. 236ra-239va.

literature

Glasberger, Chronica, AF II (1887), 277; E. Greifenstein, Der Hiob-Traktat des Marquard von Lindau (1979),..; D. Härtel, ‘Studien zu einer Handschrift des Braunschweiger Guardians Ludolfus Sunne OFM (d. 470), die Diözese Hildesheim in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart’, Zeitschrift des Vereins für Heimatkunde im Bistum Hildesheim 50 (1982), 109-118; Nigel F. Palmer, ‘Struve, Thidericus OFM’, Die deutsche Literatur des Mittelalters. Verfasserlexikon 2nd ed., 460-461.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Acerbis de Olera (Thomas Acerbis de Olera/Tommaso da Bergamo/Tommaso da Olera, 1563-1631)

OFMCap. Lay Capuchin friar from the Bergamo province. Quester, cook and gardener. Also spiritual advisor of Giovanna Maria della Croce, socius on diplimatic missions with Lorenzo of Brindisi and others, and author of spiritual works. Died at the age of 68 in Innsbruck. Beatified

editions

Tommaso da Olera, Scritti, vol. I: Selva di contemplazione, ed. Alberto Sana, Biblioteca Morcelliana, 8 (Brescia: Editrice Morcelliana, 2005). Cf. review in CF 76,1-2 (2006), 417-419; Italia Francescana 81 (2006), 275-277; Studia Patavina 54 (2007), 484-486. A revised edition appeared as: Tommaso da Olera, Scitti I, Selva di contemplazione, ed. Alberto Sana, Biblioteca Morcelliana, 8, 2nd Ed. (Brescia: Editrice Morcelliana, 2013).

Tommaso da Olera, Scitti II, Scala di perfezione, ed. Alberto Sana, Biblioteca Morcelliana, 18, 2nd Ed. (Brescia: Editrice Morcelliana, 2013).

Ippolito Guarinoni, Detti e fatti, profezie e segreti del frate cappuccino Tommaso da Bergamo, ed. Daniela Marrone (Brescia: Editrice Morcelliana, 2013).

literature

Christopher John Popravak, Desire extinguished, desire enflamed. Ascetical construction of a capuchin subjectivity (1552-1628), Phil. Diss. (Michigan, 1998); Costanzo Cargnoni, ‘Doswiadczenie modlitwy mistycznej u brata Tomasza Acerbis z Olera’, in: Mistyka franciszkanska, 89-126; Costanzo Cargnoni, ‘L’esperienza della preghiera mistica di Fra Tommaso Acerbis da Olera’, in: Due volti del francescanesimo, Miscellanea in onore di Optatus Van Assendonk e Lazzaro Iriarte, ed. Andrzej Tomkiel, Dimensioni spirituali, 17 (Rome: Edizioni Collegio S. Lorenzo da Brindisi (Laurentianum) – Istituto Francescano di spiritualità: Antonianum, 2002), 219-153; Gaudentius Walser, Diener Gottes Thomas Acerbis von Olera-Bergamo, Kapuziner, der Bruder von Tirol (Innsbruck: Kapuzinerkloster, 2005); Ambrogio Amati & Laila Nyaguy, Fra’Tommaso da Bergamo. Il cappuccino di Olera nel cuore di papa Giovanni XXIII, I testimoni (Brescia: Morcelliana, 2006); La mistica parola per parola, ed. Luigi Borriello, Maria R. Del Genio & Tomás Spidlík (Milan: Ancora, 2007), 353f.; Ippolito Guarinoni, Detti e fatti, profezie e segreti del frate cappuccino Tommaso da Bergamo, ed. Daniela Marrone, I testimoni (Brescia: Società Editrice Morcelliana, 2007); A. Calloni, ‘L’ambientazione storica del beato fra Tommaso da Olera’, Italia Francescana 88:2-3 (2013), 437-457; A. Bartolomei Romagnoli, ‘Il beato Tommaso da Olera, mistico cappuccino e teologo del «puro amore»’, Italia Francescana 88:2-3 (2013), 459-479; “Heiliger Bruder von Tirol” Thomas von Olera (Innsbruck: Provinzialat der Kapuziner Österreich-Südtirol, 2013). Publication in the context of the beatification of Tommaso Acerbis da Olera (1563-1631). Review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:1-2 (2015), 329-330.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Belchiam (d. 1537), beatus

English friar, member of the Observant Greenwich friary. which had been founded by King Edward IV and was under the active patronage of the Tudor dynasty (Henry VII, the young Henry VIII and his spouse Catherine of Aragon). When Henry VIII wanted to divorce from Catherine of Aragon, the Greenwich friars backed the queen. Royal agents entered the Greenwich monastery in June 1534, and deported Thomas and a substantial number of his fellow friars to the Tower. Early August, the convent itself was disbanded at the order of the King. At the intercession of Thomas Wriothesley, 1st Earl of Southampton, some of these friars were released, but Belchiam continued to oppose the King's procedures and wrote sermon booklet in which he disparaged the lack of courage of prelates and courtiers who went along with Henry’s wishes, based on the biblical theme 'Behold, they that wear soft clothing are in kings' houses' (Matt. xi. 8). In this work, he denounced the king as a heretic. In retribution, Belchiam was kept in Newgate, where he probably died of starvation on 30 August 1537. A copy of his sermon, found in the prison after his death, was brought to King Henry VIII, who had it burnt. Another copy was preserved by the friars, and as late as 1583, Thomas Bourchier still expressed the hope that the text might be brought to press. Unknown whether this came to pass.

literature

Th. Bourchier, Historia ecclesiastica de martyrio fratrum ordinis divi Francisci (Paris, 1581), 17-24; Wadding, Annales Ordinis Minorum XVI> A. Parkinson, Collectanea Anglo-Minoritica (1726), 240-241; A.R. Martin, ‘The Grey Friars of Greenwich’, Archaeological Journal 80 (1923), 81-114, M. Bacheca, I martiri francescani d’Inghilterra (Rome, 1930), 115-120; Henry Summerson, ‘Belchiam, Thomas (1505/6–1534?)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2004/On-line edition: http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/1982, accessed 3 Dec 2014)

 

 

 

 

Thomas Bellaci

Cf. LThK² X, 136

 

 

 

 

Thomas Brookby (Thomas Brorbey, d. 1537)

OFM. English friar. Specialist in Greek and Hebrew and a renowned preacher. When he attacked the marriage politics of Henry VIII, he was thrown in prison and was executed there on July 19, 1537. Author?

literature

Bourchier, Historia Ecclesiastica de Martyrio Fratrum Ordinis Minorum Divi Francisci (Ingolstadt, 1583), 14-15; Marco da Civezza, Storia universale delle missioni francescane (Prato, 1883) VII, i, 539-550; Gasquet-Elsässer, Heinrich VIII. und die englischen Klöster, I (Mainz, 1890), 155; A.G. Little, The Grey Friars in Oxford (Oxford, 1892), 200.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Coto (Tomás Coto, fl. first half 17th cent.)

Creole friar from Guatemala. Theologian and linguist. Definitor and elected custos in 1641. In this capacity he traveled to the Franciscan general chapter at Toledo.

manuscripts

Vocabulario de la Lengua cakchiquel, v. Guatimalteca (…) En que se contienen todos los modos y frases elegantes con que los Naturales la hablan, y d. q. se pueden valer los Ministros estudiossos para su mejor educacion y Enseñanza (ca. 1651). Where is ths manuscript?

literature

Francisco Vázquez, Crónica de la Provincia del Santísimo Nombre de Jesús de Guatemala, 2nd Ed., Bibliotea “Goathemala”, 14-17, 4 Vols (Guatemala, 1937-1944) III, 33 & IV, 262, 263; Beristain II, 165; Nora B. Thompson, ‘Algunos manuscritos guatemaltecos en Filadelfia’, Anales de la Soc. de Geografia e Historia 23 (Guatemala, 1948), 27; A Bio-Bibliography of Franciscan Authors in Colonial Central America, ed. Eleanor B. Adams (Washington D.C.: Academy of American Franciscan History, 1953), 27; Manuel Castro y Castro, ‘Lenguas indigenas transmitidas por los Franciscanos del S. XVII’, in: Los Franciscanos en el Nuevo Mundo (siglo XVII), La Rábida, 18-23 septiembre de 1989 (Madrid: Editorial Deimos, 1992), 458.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Bourchier (d. 1586)

OFM. English friar and martyrologist. He was educated at Magdalen College, Oxford. Took the habit at Greenwich around 1555/58 during the reign of Queen Mary. Went in exile when Elisabeth came into power. He first went to Paris, where he studied at the Sorbonne. Following this he went South and spent most of his remaining life in Italy, teaching theology at Genoa and Turin. Became apostolic penitentiary at St. John of Lateran and died in Rome. Thomas was a productive author. In addition, he would have acted as corrector and glossator for the Censura Orientalis Ecclesiae by Stanislaus Socolovius (Paris, 1584), although this is denied by Ignatius Fennessy (in the lemma on Bourchier in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

editions

Tractatus de Iudicio Religiosorum, in Quo Demonstratur quod a Saecularibus Judicari non Debeant: >> manuscript mentioned by Wadding.

Historia Rerum inter Catholicos et Haereticos Gestarum (Venice, 1570).

Sermones de Beata Maria Virgine (Venice, 1571).

Libellus Carminum Spiritualium (Turin, 1571).

Expositio Orationis Dominicae (Venice, 1578).

Oratio Doctissima et Efficacissima ad Franciscum Gonzagam pro Pace et Disciplina Regulari Magni Conventus Parisiensis Instituenda (Paris, 1582).

Historia Ecclesiastica de Martyrio Fratrum Ordinis S. Francisci, Dictorum de Observantia, Qui Partim in Anglia sub Henrico VIII, Partim in Belgio sub Principe Austriaco, Partim in Hibernia Tempore Elisabethae Regnantis Reginae, Idque ab Anno 1536 usque ad Annum 1582 Passi Sunt (Ingolstadt, 1583/Paris, 1586).

Sermones XX Familiares de Adventu Messiae et de SS. Trinitate (Venice, 1585).

literature

Wadding, Scriptores (ed. Rome, 1906), 215; Wadding, Annales Minorum (Quaracchi, 1931) XIX, 104-105 & XX, 437-438;Thaddeus, The Franciscans in England, 1600-1850 (London, 1898), 18-19; A. Van den Wyngaert, ‘Bourchier’, DHGE X, 142; Ignatius Fennessy, ‘Bourchier, Thomas (d. c.1586)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004 [http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/2994, accessed 3 Dec 2014])

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Brounceston de Anglia/Thomas Broundeston/Thomas Scotus/Thomas of Braunceston (fl. first half 14th cent.)

OFM, Later OP. English friar, preacher and natural philosopher. He fell in disrepute with the partisans of Michael of Cesena, probably when he allegedly openly supported Pope John XXII’s viewpoints on Franciscan poverty as put forward in Ad conditorum canonum, Cum inter nonnullos and Quia quorundam mentes. Hence, in Michael of Cesena’s Appellatio in forma majori, edited in Nicolaus Minorita, Chronica , ed. Gedeon Gál &David Flood (St. Bonaventure, N.Y., 1996), 419f., Thomas is described as a necromancer, alchemist, heretic and evil-doer, who had apostized from the order and then had sought the support of pope John XXII, who had received him heartily. Whatever the exact background of Michael of Cesena’s allegations, fact is that pope John wrote on 11 July 1328 to the prior of the Dominicans in Carcassone, demanding him to receive Thomas of Brounceton into the Order of Friars Preachers (BF V, no.720). Thomas, in disfavour with his Franciscan superiors, apparently had made for the papal curia in order to obtain a special papal dispensation for his transfer to the Dominicans (as such a transfer was in normal circumstances forbidden). Patrick Nold suggests that, subsequently, Thomas might have become a lector in natural philosophy in the Dominican friary of Rieux (identifyingThomas Brounceton with the Thomas Anglicus assigned to this position, with reference to C. Douais, Essai sur l’organisation des études dans l’ordre des Frères Prêcheurs au treizieme et au quatorzième siècle, 1216-1342 (Paris, 1889), 222). Later, he seemed to have become the focus of scorn in the Collirium Fidei by Alvarus Pelagius (Alvaro Pelayo/Alvaro Pais) for a set of heretical positions in the field of natural philosophy, pointing towards Averroist tendencies in the work of a certain ‘Thomas Scotus’, who had transferred from the Friars Minor to the Dominicans, but subsequently would have left the Dominicans as well.

manuscripts

Collationes MS London Gray’s Inn Ms. 7 (following sermons by Bertrand de la Tour). The manuscript, once in the possession of the Franciscan friary of Chester, contains five of Brounceton’s collations on the Advent Gospel readings and a fragment of a sixth collation on an Advent Epistle reading

literature

Mario Esposito, ‘Les hérésies de Thomas Scotus d’après le Collirium Fidei’, Revue d’Histoire Ecclésiastique 33 (1937), 56-69; Paulo Durão, ‘Thomas Scotus, Aristotelicus, qui Saeculo XIV Olysipone docuit’, in: Die Metaphysik im Mittelalter. Ihr Ursprung und ihre Bedeutung, ed. Paul Wilpert (Berlin, 1963), 472-474; Neil R. Ker, Medieval Manuscripts in British Libraries, Vol. 1 (Oxford, 1969), 57; Mário Santiago de Carvalho, Estudos sobre Alvaro Pais e outros franciscanos (séculos xiii-xiv) (Lisbon, 2001), 95-201; Patrick Nold, ‘Thomas of Braunceton O.M./O.P.’, in: Kirchenbild und Spiritualität. Dominikanische Beiträge zur Ekklesiologie und zum kirchlichen Leben im Mittelalter. Festschrift für Ulrich Horst OP zum 75. Geburtstag, ed. Thomas Prügl & Marianne Schlosser (Paderborn-Munich-Vienna-Zürich: Ferdinand Schöningh, 2007), 179-195 (providing all information contained in this lemma)

With thanks to Patrick Nold for providing me with an offprint of his article

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Bungay (fl. ca. 1275)

Tenth lector at Oxford, provincial minister of England (ca. 1272-5), 15th lector at Cambridge (ca. 1282). Wrote on Aristotle’s Physics and the Sentences of Lombard. His Sentences commentary doesn't seem to have survived.

manuscripts

Quaestiones super Libros de Coelo et Mundo: MS Cambridge, Caius College 509 ff. 209-252b.

Quaestiones: MS Assisi, Bibl. Com. 158 & 196.

Comm. in Romanos [extracts]: MS Cambridge, Pembroke College cod. 87.

literature

Little & Pelster, Oxford Theology and Theologians, 74-75 [on his non-surviving Sentences commentary], 105-108; Little, The Grey Friars of Oxford, 153-4; Moorman, The GreyFriars of Cambridge, 32, 157f; LThK² X, 138; Jenny Swanson, ‘Bungay, Thomas (fl. 1270–1283)’, in: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004/ http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/3939); Deanne Marie Williams, ‘Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay and the rhetoric of temporality’, in: Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England, ed. Gordon McMullan & David Matthews (Cambridge, 2007), 31-50 [who is the 'friar Bungay' in this early modern drama piece?]

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Capua (d. 1239 or 1243)

Franciscan poet. Composed hymns on Francis, employing the first lines of well-known breviary hyms as caudae in his own poems.

literature/editions

Deus morum, dux minorum [hymn for the feast of St. Francis], ed. in: Analecta Hymnica, ed. G. Dreves, C. Blume & H.M. Bannister, 55 Vols. (Leipzig, 1886-1922), Vol. 52, 182; Deus morum, dux minorum, ed. in: Lateinische Hymnen des Mittelalters, ed. F.J. Mone, 3 Vols. (Freiburg i. br., 1853-1855), II, 229.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Celano

Born in Celano (near Aquila). He joined the young Franciscan movemeny in 1214 or 1215. Active as missionary in the German lands (under Julian of Speyer). Held several administrative functions on the German provinces. Wrote, on request of pope Gregory IX, the first official Vita of Francis (Vita Prima S. Francisci, 1228/30, in the context of Francis's canonization, This text of Celano received its first versification by Henry ofAvranches in 1232). Later, at the request of minister general Crescent of Jesu, he was asked to write a new Vita (Vita Secunda, 1246-47; approved on the general chapter of Lyon, 1247), including new materials (esp. eye-witness accounts of Leo, Angelo, and Rufino, collected after the call for testimonies by the general chapter of Genoa (1244)), and stressing different aspects of Francis's life. This second vita was supplemented with a Tractatus de Miraculis (1251-53, composed at request of minister general John of Parma). More recently, thanks to research by Jacques Dalarun, Sean Field and Laura Light, it has become clear that Thomas also made an abbreviated version of his first Vita of Francis at the request of Elias of Cortona, in all probability not long after Elias became minister general in 1232. This abbreviated version, first signalled in Dalarun's 2007 study on what he then called the Legenda Umbra, and studied more in-depth, edited and translated in 2015, was at least in part intended for liturgical commamorative purposes, as has been confirmed by manuscripts found by Dalarun, Field and Light. The work now goes by the provisional title Vie de notre bienheureux père François/Thome Celanensis Vita beati patris nostri Francisci (Vita brevior). This discovery also sheds new light on the composition history of the later Legenda ad usum Chori. Until recently, it was assumed that Thomas wrote this (still under Elias of Cortona) mainly on the basis of his first vita. Yet it now seems that it is at least in part a reworking/shortening of the abbreviated version now brought to light by Dalarun and others. Likewise, it seems that the newly discovered text by Thomas was itself a source for the works of Julian of Speyer and others. Thomas is also mentioned as the author of the Vita of Clare (on request of pope Alexander IV), and the liturgical sequences Dies Irae, Fregit Victor Virtualis, and Sanctitatis Nova Signa (Sequence for the 4 October Mass). The ascription of Claire’s first Vita to Thomas of Celano seems secure, yet two of the liturgical sequences (namely Dies Irae and Fregit Victor Virtualis) are probably the work of other friars. (see below). Scholars now agree that Thomas of Celano in all probability did not write the Vita Assidua on Anthony of Padua. Thomas died some time after 1253, when he was chaplan of the Clares of Val di Varri. His Vita Prima and Vita Secunda had a quick succes, which also is born out by several versified translations into German and French. Yet most copies of Thomas’ Vita Prima and Vita Secunda, like his liturgical abbreviations rediscovered by Field, Light and Dalarun were destroyed on the order of the 1266 general chapter, which adopted Bonaventure’s Legenda Major as the new official vita for the order.

editions:

S. Francisci Assisiensis Vita et Miracula Auctore Fr. Thoma de Celano, ed. E. d'Alençon (Rome, 1906); Vita Prima, Vita Secunda, et Tractatus de Miraculis, in: Analecta Franciscana 10 (Quaracchi, 1926-1941), 1-331, and in Fontes Franciscani (1995), 275-754; Tommaso da Celano, Vita di S. Francesco e Trattato dei miracoli, Introduzione, traduzione e note di Fausta Casolini, Fonti e testi francescani, 3 (S. Maria degli Angeli (Pg), Edizioni Porziuncola, 52000); Jacques Dalarun, ‘Appendice: Nuova edizione dei ‘Miracula santi Francisci post mortem’, Frate Francesco 72 (2006), 28-43. Thomas of Celano’s First Life of St. Francis, trans. Christopher Stace (London, 2000); Thomas von Celano, Leben und Wunder des heiligen Franziskus von Assisi, ed. Engelbert Grau, New Edition, Franziskanische Quellenschriften, 5 (Kevelaer: Coelde, Butzon & Bercker, 2001); See also the Fonti Francescani and the series Francis of Assisi. Early Documents in the vita & miracula section of this site; Vie de sainte Claire: Texte latin, ed. F. Pennacchi (Assisi, 1910); D. Vorreux, Sainte Claire d’Assise, Documents (Paris, 1983), 17-77; Tommaso da Celano, Leggenda di santa Chiara Vergine, introd. & trans. Marco Guido (Milan: Paoline Editoriale Libri, 2015)..The liturgical sequences Dies Irae, Fregit Victor Virtualis, and Sanctitatis Nova Signa are edited in Analecta Franciscana 10 (Quaracchi, 1926-1941), 402-404. On the Vita Assidua of Anthony, see especially V. Gamboso, La Vita prima di S. Antonio (Padua, 1981). See for Celano’s work also the Vitae & miraculae section under Franciscus Assisiensis.

Thomas de Celano, Memoriale. Editio critico-synoptica duarum redactionum ad fidem codicum manuscriptorum, ed. F. Accrocca & A. Horowski, Subsidia scientifica franciscalia, 12 (Rome: Istituto Storico dei Cappuccini, 2011). This is a new edition of Celano II, based on the idea that this ‘Memoriale’ actually exists in two redactions. A lengthy presentations of the work can be found in Miscellanea Francescana 111:3-4 (2011), 553-579. See also Filippo Sedda, ‘Questioni di ecdotica ‘Francescana’: Note a margine di una recente edizione critica del Memoriale in Desiderio Animae’, Collectanea Franciscana 82 (2012), 741-756, which is a critique of this new edition and the rationale behind it.

For the new developments with regard to the newly found abbreviation of the Vita Prima, first called the Legenda Umbra and now also Vie de notre bienheureux père François/Thome Celanensis Vita beati patris nostri Francisci (Vita brevior), see: Jacques Dalarun, Vers une résolution de la question franciscaine. La Légende ombrienne de Thomas de Celano (Paris: ed. Fayard, 2007), and subsequent studies by him, Laura Light and Sean Field. The Legenda Umbra was included in a new French translation of Thomas' works, namely: Thomas de Celano, Les vies de Saint François d'Assise: ‘Vie du bienheureux François', ‘Légende de choeur', ‘Légende ombrienne', ‘Mémorial dans le désir de l'âme', trans. Dominique Poirel & Jacques Dalarun, with collaboration of Jean-François Godet-Calogeras & Jean-Baptiste Lebigue, Sources Franciscaines (Paris: Éditions franciscaines & Éditions du CERF, 2009) [o.a. reviews in CF 79 (2009), 695-697;AFH 102 (2009), 513-517; Revue d’Histoire Ecclésiastique 106 (2011), 285-287]. It was also issued in French as Thomas de Celano, La Vie de notre bienheureux père François. Traduction française annotée et concordances, trans. Jacques Dalarun, in: Études Franciscaines n.s. 8:2 (2015). In 2015, this was followed by a more in-depth study of the precise context of the work, its relation with the Vita prima and the Legenda ad usum Chori, as well as by a new critical edition and another French translation. See: Jacques Dalarun (ed.), 'Thome Celanensis Vita beati patris nostri Francisci (Vita brevior). Présentation et édition critique', Analecta Bollandiana 133:1 (2015), 23-86; Jacques Dalarun, La Vie retrouvée de François d'Assise, Sources franciscaines (Paris: Editions Franciscaines, 2015). See also the review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:1-2 (2015), 295-296, and the 2016 collective volume Tommaso da Celano agiografo di San Francesco.

Literature (endless) [see also under Vitae et miraculae]

Wadding, Scriptores, 215; Sbaralea, Supplementum III, 121-124; Bibliotheca Sanctorum XII, 567-573; Z. Lazzeri, ‘Le leggende di S. Chiarae il loro autore’, Studi Francescani (1916-1920), 209-224; P. Hoonhout, Het Latijn van Thomas van Celano (Amsterdam, 1947); S. Spirito, Il Francescanesimo di fra Tomasso da Celano (Rome, 1963); G. Odoardi, ‘La Patria di Tommaso da Celano’, Miscellanea Francescana 68 (1968), 344-369; Georges Mailleux, Thesaurus Celanensis, Vita prima, Legenda ad usum chori, Vita secunda, Tractatus de miraculis, Legenda sanctae Clarae virginis, concordance, index listes de fréquence, tables comparatives, Corpus des sources franciscaines, 1 (Louvain, 1974); A. Quaglia, ‘La regola francescana. Convergenze e divergenze in Celano, fra Giuliano da Spira e san Bonaventura', Miscellanea Francescana 82 (1982), 471-479; Tommaso da Celano e la sua opera di biografo di s. Francescno. Atti del convegno di studio: Celano, 29-30 novembre 1982 (Celano, 1985) [Conference acts with important contributions by Raoul Manselli and Edith Pasztor]; Catholicisme XIV, 1208-9; DSpir XV, 792-794; E. Grau,‘Thomas von Celano. Leben und Werk’, Wissenschaft & Weisheit 52 (1989), 97-140; E. Pasztor, `La fraternità di Francesco e Tommaso da Celano', in: I compagni di Francesco e la prima generazione minoritica (1992), 81-108; Willibrord-Christian van Dijk, ‘Une traduction française du XVe siècle de la vie de Sainte Claire de Thomas de Celano’, Laurentianum 36 (1995), 3-18; Frate Tommaso dfa Celano, storico e santo. Atti del convegno tenutosi nel convento di San Francesco nei giorni 6-7 agosto 1994, ed N. Petrone (Tagliacozzo, 1995); G. Barone, LMA 8 (1996), 714-5; J. Dalarun, La malavventura di Francesco d'Assisi. Per un uso storico delle leggende francescane (Assisi, 1996), esp. Ch. III & IV; N. Kuster, ‘Thomas von Celano und Klaras Armut in San Damiano. Beitrag zu einer Neuinterpretation der beiden Franziskanusviten und zu Diskussion über den Verfasser der Klaralegende’, Wissenschaft und Weisheit 59 (1996), 45-80; E. Wenneker,‘Thomas von Celano, Franziskanermönch und Historiker’, in: Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XI, 1379-1382; Roberto Paciocco & Felice Accrocca, La leggenda di un santo di nome Francesco. Tommaso da Celano e la Vita beati Francisci, Edizione Biblioteca Francescana Tau 9 (Milan, 1999) [focus on Thomas of Celano’s works and on several other 13th century saints’ lives on Francis. Cf. review in Wissenschaft und Weisheit 63 (2000), 145-149]; Marcos Weaver, ‘Tomás de Celano propone la virtud a los que exigen milagros’, Misc. Franc. 100 (2000), 215-235; Jacques Paul, ‘The image of St. Francis in the Treatise on the Miracles by Thomas of Celano’, Greyfriars Review 14 (2000), 257-276; Justin Lang, ‘Thomas v. Celano’, in: Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche 3 IX, 1526s; Daris Schiopetto, Interpretazione e attualizzazione della “norma vitae” nel “Memoriale in desiderio animae” di Tommaso da Celano, Centro StudiAntoniani, “Varia” (Padova, Centro Studi Antoniani, 2000). Cf review by F. Accrocca in Collectanea Franciscana 71 (2001), 213-215; Timothy J. Johnson, ‘Lost in sacred space: textual hermeneutics, liturgical worship, and Celano’s Legenda ad usum chori’, Franciscan Studies 59 (2001), 109-131; John Patrick Anselm Bequette, Constructing an image of St. Francis: A rhetorical investigation of Thomas Celano’s ‘Vita Prima Sancti Francisci, PhD. Diss. (Saint Louis University: University Divinity School and Dept. of Theological Studies, 2001); Sean Kinsella, ‘Athanasius’ life of Antony as monastic paradigm for the first life of St. Francis by Thomas of Celano: a preliminary outline’, Antonianum 77:3 (2002), 541-556; Thomas Renna, ‘St.Francis as prophet in Celano and Bonaventure’, Michigan Academician 33:4 (2002), 321-332; Sean Kinsella, “The Lord give you peace’: the preaching of peace in the writings and early lives of St. Francis of Assisi’, Mediaevistik 16 (2003), 51-99; Felice Accrocca, ‘Due diverse redazioni del Memoriale in desiderio animae di Tommaso da Celano? Una discussione da riprendere’,Collectanea Franciscana 74:1-2(2004), 5-22 (discusses two extant MSS of Celano’s Vita Secunda, arguing for a new study and a new edition of the text); F. Accrocca, ‘La Vita beati Francisci di Tommaso da Celano. Un’opera elevata e complessa’, Frate Francesco n.s. 70/2 (2004), 485-505; John Bequette, The Eloquence of Sanctity: Rhetoric in Thomas of Celano's Vita Prima Sancti Francisci (St. Bonaventure NY: Franciscan Institute Publications, 2004); Oktavian Schmucki, ‘Thomas von Celano’, Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart, 4thed. VIII, 376f; Beato Tommaso da Celano, biografo di s. Francesco. Documenti e Testimonianze (Tagliacozzo: Convento dei Conventuali, 2005); Tommaso da Celano nelle fonti medievali dei secoli XIII-XV. Atti del Convegno, Tagiacozzo 4 ottobre 2005 (Taglacozzo: Convento dei Conventuali, 2005); Maria Teresa Dolso, ‘Note a margine di Francesco d’Assisi e il paradosso della minoritas. La Vita beati Francisci di Tommaso da Celano’, Cristianesimo nella storia, 26:3 (2005), 683-696; Donald Patten, Biblical Typology in Thomas of Celano’s ‘Vita S. Francisci’, Diss. (Saint Louis University, Univ. Divinity School and Dep. of Theological Studies, 2005); Raimondo Michetti, Francesco d’Assisi e il paradosso della minoritas, Cortona Francescana, 2 (Cortona, Academia Etrusca, 2005). Also published as: Raimondo Michetti, Francesco d’Assisi e il paradosso della minoritas. La Vita beati Francisci di Tommaso da Celano, Nuovi Studi Storici, 66 (Rome: Ist. Stor. Ital. Peril Medio Evo, 2004) [cf. review in Il Santo 46/1-2 (2006), 285-287; Collectanea Franciscana 76,1-2 (2006), 310-316; Revue Mabillon 17 (2006), 271-272]; Felice Accrocca, ‘Le due redazioni del ‘Memoriale nel desiderio dell’anima’ di Tommaso da Celano’, Frate Francesco 72 (2006), 153-186l Felice Accrocca, ‘Francesco d’Assisi e il paradosso della ‘minoritas’. La ‘Vita beati Francisci’ di Tommaso da Celano’, Frate Francesco 72 (2006), 331-361; André Vauchez, ‘François d’Assise marchand et chevalier chez Thomas de Celano’, in: ‘Ubi neque aerugo neque tinea demolitur’. Studi in onore di Luigi Pellegrini per i suoi settanta anni, ed. Maria Grazia Del Fuoco (Naples: Liguori Editore, 2006), 781-795; Jacques Dalarun, ‘Tommaso da Celano autore della questione francescana’, Frate Francesco 72 (2006), 13-27; André Vauchez, ‘Thomas de Celano et saint François: à propos d'un ouvrage récent. Une réhabilitation: Thomas de Celano, premier interprète de saint François et du projet franciscain’, Revue Mabillon 17 (2006), 267-271; Marco Guida, ‘La pericope clariano-damianita di ‘Vita beati Francisci’ VIII, 18-20: un’aggiunta all’opera di Tommaso da Celano?’, Collectanea Franciscana 77:1-2 (2007), 5-26; Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, 11 Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) IX, 3-4, 176-180; J.A. Wayne Hellmann, ‘Prayer in the ‘Life of Saint Francis’ by Thomas de Celano’, in: Franciscans at Prayer, 63-91; Felice Accrocca, ‘Francesco forma dei Minori. Il ‘Memoriale’ di Tommaso, scrigno prezioso’, Frate Francesco 73 (Rome, 2007), 239-275; Felice Accrocca, ‘I ‘miracoli’ del beato Francesco’, ovvero la forza narrativa di Tommaso’, Frate Francesco 73 (Rome, 2007), 557-590; Jacques Dalarun, Vers une résolution de la question franciscaine. La Légende ombrienne de Thomas de Celano (Paris: ed. Fayard, 2007) [Review in AFH 100 (2007), 561-564; Collectanea Franciscana 78 (2008), 364-369; Annales ESG 63 (2008), 183-185; Franciscan Studies 66 (2008), 479-510]; Wolfgang Bretschneider, ‘Bewundert-verstoßen-wiederentdeckt: Die Sequenz ‘Dies irae’. Ein musiktheologischer Beitrag’, in: Bibel und Kirche 63 (2008), 233-237; Timothy J. Johnson, ‘Wonders in Stone and Space: Theological Dimensions of the Miracle Accounts in Celano and Bonaventure’, Franciscan Studies 67 (2009), 71-90; Paul Bösch, ‘Der erste Aufenthalt auf La Verna in der ‘Vita beati Francisci’ des Thomas von Celano’, Wissenschaft & Weisheit 72 (2009), 18-54; Franziskus-Quellen. Die Schriften des Heiligen Franziskus, Lebensbeschreibungen, Chroniken und Zeugnisse über ihn und seinen Orden, ed. Dieter Berg, Leonhard Lehmann et al., Zeugnisse des 13. und 14. Jahrhunderts zur Franziskanischen Bewegung, Band 1 (Kevelaer: Butzon & Bercker, Ed. T. Coelde, 2009), notably: J.-B. Freyer, ‘Einleitung in die Trilogie des Thomas von Celano’, 187-194; J.-B. Freyer, ‘1. Lebensbeschreibung (Vita) Celanos, 2. Vita oder Memoriale des Thomas von Celano, 3. Das Mirakelbuch’, 195-486; L. Lehmann, ‘Chorlegende des Thomas von Celano’, 487-495; Silvia Romanelli, ‘Sequela, imitatio e confirmitas’ nell’opera di Tommaso da Celano’, Franciscana 11 (2009), 49-94; Paul Bösch, ‘Redaktionsgeschichtliche Beobachtungen zum Bericht über die Wundmale in der ‘Vita beati Francisci’ des Thomas von Celano’, Laurentianum 50 (2009), 111-150; Jacques Dalarun, Oltre la questione francescana: la leggenda nascosta di san Francesco (la ‘Leggenda umbra’ di Tommaso da Celano), Fonti e ricerche, 21 (Padua: Editrici francescane, 2009; Fernando Uribe, Introducción a las hagiografías de san Francesco y santa Clara de Asís (siglos XIII y XIV), Publicaciones Instituto Teológico de Murcia. Serie Mayor, 30 (Murcia: Instituto Teológico Franciscano-Editorial Espigas, 2010). Review in CF 81:1-2 (2011), 380-382; Timothy J. Johnson, ‘Meraviglie di pietre e spazi. La dimensione teologica delle narrazioni sui miracoli in Tommaso da Celano e Bonaventura da Bagnoregio’, in: Paradoxien der Legitimation: Ergebnisse einer deutsch-italienisch-französischen Villa Vigoni-Konferenz, ed. Cécile Caby, Gert Melville, Annette Kehnel & Cristina Andenna (Florence: SISMEL, 2010), 479-496; Felice Accrocca & Teofilo Domenichelli, ‘Tommaso da Celano e l’Archivum Franciscanum Historicum’, AFH 104 (2011), 183-226; Alberto Torra, ‘El titulado ‘Liber de Penis infernalibus’ en un manuscrito de la ‘Vita Prior’ de T. de Celano’, Estudios Franciscanos 112 (2011), 261-282; Achim Wesjohann, Mendikantische Gründungserzählungen im 13. und 14. Jahrhundert: Mythen als Element institutioneller Eigengeschichtsschreibung der mittelalterlichen Franziskaner, Dominikaner und Augustiner-Eremiten, Vita Regularis. Ordnungen und Deutungen religiosen Lebens im Mittelalter, Abhandlungen, 49 (Münster: LIT Verlag, 2012), 66-75; J.A. Wayne Hellmann, ‘A Theology of Preaching – A Theology of Transformation. The Life of St. Francis by Thomas of Celano’, in: Franciscans and Preaching. Every Miracle from the Beginning of the World Came about through Words, ed. Timothy Johnson, The Medieval Franciscans, 7 (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2012), 59-69; Felice Accrocca, Un santo di carta. Le fonti biografiche di san Francesco d’Assisi, Biblioteca di Frate Francesco, 13 (Rome-Milan: Centro Culturale Aracoeli-Biblioteca Francescana, 2013); Felice Accrocca, ‘‘Di statura mediocre, piuttosto piccola’. Il Francesco narrato da Tommaso da Celano’, Miscellanea Francescana 114 (2014), 54-72; Marco Guida, ‘La Legenda sanctae Clarae virginis di Tommaso da Celano’, in: Francesco e Chiara d'Assisi: percorsi di ricerca sulle fonti: atti delle giornate di studio Edizioni e traduzioni: Milano, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, 28 ottobre 2011, Roma, Pontificia Università Antonianum, 9 marzo 2012 (Padua, 2014), 319-362; John W. Coakley, ‘The Conversion of St. Francis and the Writing of Christian Biography, 1228-1263’, Franciscan Studies 72 (2014), 27-71; Jacques Dalarun, La Vie retrouvée de François d'Assise, Sources franciscaines (Paris: Editions Franciscaines, 2015); Jacques Dalarun, ‘Tommaso da Celano: la Vita del beato padre nostro Francesco’, Frate Francesco 133 (2015), 289-386; F. Sedda, ‘La “malavventura” di Tommaso da Celano dal medioevo all’alba del XXI secolo’, in: Tommaso da Celano agiografo di san Francesco. Atti del Convegno Internazionale, Roma, 29 gennaio 2016, ed. E. Kumka (Rome, 2016), 11-45. The volume Tommaso da Celano agiografo di San Francesco as a whole is of course important. Cf. review in CF 87:1-2 (2017), 345-347; Jacques Dalarun, ‘The Rediscovered Manuscript A Story of Friendship’, Franciscan Studies 74 (2016), 231-238; Sean Field, ‘New Light on the 1230s: History, Hagiography, and Thomas of Celano’s The Life of Our Blessed Father Francis’, Franciscan Studies 74 (2016), 239-247; Timothy Johnson, ‘In the Workshop of a Theologian. The Life of Our Blessed Father Francis by Thomas of Celano’, Franciscan Studies 74 (2016), 249-262; Johannes Schneider, 'Ein neuer Franziskus!? Das neuentdeckte Franziskus-Leben des Thomas von Celano', Wissenschaft und Weisheit 79 (2016), 209-228; Edith Feistner, 'Der Laie Franziskus im Vergleich zum Kleriker Dominikus. Ordensgründerlegenden und Ordensidentität von Thomas von Celano bis Jacobus de Voragine', Wissenschaft und Weisheit 79 (2016), 101-117; Jacques Dalarun, 'Pour poursuivre le dialogue sur la “Vie retrouvée” de Thomas de Celano', Collectanea Franciscana 86:3-4 (2016), 759-763; Paul Bösch, 'Die Vita brevior und drei verslegenden als Spiegel verschollener Franziskus-viten', Archivum Franciscanum Historicum 110:1-2 (2017), 125-194; Ordo et Sanctitas: The Franciscan Spiritual Journey in Theology and Hagiography. Essays in Honor of J. A. Wayne Hellmann, O.F.M. Conv., ed. Michael F. Cusato, Timothy J. Johnson & Steven J. McMichael, The Medieval Franciscan, 15 (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2017).

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Cori (Tommaso da Cori, 1655-1729)

OFMObs, provincia romana

editions

La vita dei frati nel Ritiro secondo il B.Tommaso da Cori, Studio critico del testo autografo delle sue ordinazioni per i Retiri, ed. Umberto Vittorio Buttarelli (Assisi, 1996).

Lettere inedite del B. Tommaso da Cori dei frati minori (1655-1729), ed. Umberto Vittorio Buttarelli (Assisi, 1993).

literature

U. Butarelli, ‘Ritrovati autografi di lettere di San Tommaso da Cori (1655-1729)’, Frate Francesco 65,2 (1999).

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Frigano (d. 1381)

In 1349 he was among the electors of the provincial minister of Bologna. Probably custos of Ferrara. Regent lector at the convent of Bologna when elected provincial minister in 1354. Once more elected in 1360. Minister general in 1367. Shortly thereafter deposed after complaints. Rehabilitated by a commission installed by Urban V. Career again on the upswing after 1370: Patriarch of Grado in 1372, cardinal in 1378. Sbaralea attributes to him several works. For a more detailed biography, see Cl. Schmitt, ‘Frignano’, DHGE XIX, 99-100.

manuscripts

Opera Varia:?

De providentia:? >> apparently in the Vatican Library. Check Bibliotheca Bibliothecarum Manuscriptorum, ed. B. de Montfaucon, Vol. 1 (Paris, 1789), 139a.

Commentarii Theologici:?

Conciones:?

Actus Examinis Canonizationis S. Birgittae Viduae. A letter of approbation of the rule of Brigitta of Sweden: MS Venice, Marciana. See: AASS Oct. IV, 535ff. & Bibliotheca manuscripta ad S. Marci Venetiarum, ed. J. Valentinelli, Vol. 2 (Venice, 1869), 204-205.

Constitutiones:

editions

Constitutiones Synodales (constitutions for the archdiocese of Grado), edited in: Mansi, XXXI-A (Gratz, 1961), col. 289-368.

literature

Sbaralea, Supplementum (ed. Rome, 1936) III, 127b-128a; G. Tondini, Delle memorie istoriche concernenti la vita del cardinale Tommaso da Frignano (Macerata, 1782); AFH 2 (1909), 202, 204, 211, 214; AFH 3 (1910), 563, 573, 706; AFH 4 (1911), 346, 523; A. Callebaut, ‘Thomas deFrignano, ministre général, et ses défenseurs: Pétrarque, Philippe de Cabassole et Philippe de Maizières, vers 1369-1370’, AFH 10 (1917), 239-249); B. Pergamo, ‘I Francescani alla Facoltà Teologica di Bologna’, AFH 27 (1934), 9-10; G. Pistoni, ‘Un Modenese amico del Petrarca, il cardinale Tommaso Frignani, con lettera inedita di Coluccio Salutati’, Atti e memorie della Accademia di scienze, lettere e arti di Modena 12 (1954); G. Mollat, ‘Thomas de Frignano et la diplomatie pontificale’, AFH 55(1962), 521-523; U. Betti, I Cardinali dell’Ordine dei Frati Minori (Rome, 1963), 43-44; Cl. Schmitt, ‘Frignano’, DHGE XIX, 99-100.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Hales (fl. ca. 1240)

Franciscan preacher and poet. Probably born at Hales in Worchestershire. Allegedly studied theology at the University of Paris (if so, he probably would have followed a lectorate program and not a degree program, as older bio-bibliographical resources suggest) and embarked on an impressive preaching career in France and England (His name is mentioned in two letters by Adam Marsh, cf. the edition of J.S. Brewer, in Monumenta Franciscana (London, 1858), 181-185 (n. 75) and 394-396 (n. 227)). For a considerable time, Thomas held positions at the Franciscan London friary, which had close ties with the English crown. Horrall (1986), 296f suggests that Thomas wrote for an aristocratic female religious audience. He composed ‘ad instantiam cuiusdam puelle Deo dicate’ (a Poor Clare?) a song in medieval English (in 26 strophes) on the love of/for God and the vanities of the world, entitled the Luue Ron. He also is mentioned as the author of a Vita Beatae Virginis (which received a middle English translation as The Lyf of Oure Lady). In addition, Thomas would have compiled several rather meditative sermons. Only one of these, an anglo-norman text, seems to have survived.

manuscripts/editions

Luue-Ron (Love Song, composed between 1252-1272): MS Oxford, Jesus College 29. The text has been edited three times, namely as The Luue-Ron, ed. R. Morris, in: Old English Miscellany (Oxford, 1872), 93-99, as Luue Ron, in: English Lyrics of the Thirteenth Century, ed. Carleton Brown (Oxford, 1932), 68-74 (no. 43), and as The Luue-Ron, in: Early Middle English Texts, ed. B. Dickens & R.H. Wilson (Cambridge, 1952), 104-109 [The poem hails Christ the saviour as the model of authentic and perfect love. It also contrasts the love of Christ with the famous fatal passions of mythological figures, like Paris and Helena, and Tristan and Isolde. The earthly love of the latter is vain, precarious, and passing (emphasised with an ubi sunt-approach >> all these lovers have returned to the clay from which they were formed) whereas Christ is the model of authentic love: ‘Mayde, if thu wilnest after leof mon/ ich techne enne treowe king./ Aswete, if thu inowe/ the gode thewes of thisse childe,/ he is feyr & bryhton hoewe,/ of glese chere, of mode mydle,/ of lufsum lost, of truste treowe,/ freo of teorte, of wisdom wilde,/ ne thurhte the neuer rewe,/ mythe studo the in his ylde.’ vv. 87-96 (Maiden, if you long for a lover/ Teach you of one who is a true king./ Ah, sweet, if you but knew/ the good strengths of this Lord./ He is fair and bright of hue./ of gladsome cheer, of manner mild,/ he is pleasing in love and worthy of trust,/ noble of heart and full of wisdom./ Never would you have to rue/ if you put yourself under his protection.) The poem was possibly made for an aristocratic Poor Clare, maybe a member of the monastry of Northampton. Thomas’ work has a strong emotional appeal.].

Vita Beatae Virginis/ The Lyf of Oure Lady: Cologne, Historisches Archiv der Stadt Köln, G.B. Fol. 86; Madrid, Bib. Nac. 8769; MS Oxford, Bodl. Hatton 102; Oxford, Bodleian Rawlinson D. 1236; Schägl 158 [454.a] 67; Oxford, Bodleian Bodley 655; Oxford, Bodleian Add. A. 268; Basel, Universitätsbibliothek B. VIII 1; Basel, Universitätsbibliothek N VI 13; Würzburg, Universitätsbibliothek Cod. M.ch. f.109; Vienna, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek Vind. Pal. 4670; Cambridge, Gonville and Caius College 437; Paris, BN Lat. 18324; Mainz, Stadtbibliothek I 343 f. 109r [‘compilata a Fratre Thoma de halis anglico ordinis fratrum minorum’]; Graz, Universitätsbibl. Cod. Gracensis 241; London, Gray’s Inn 12;Marmoutier>>?. The translation and the Latin text have been edited by Sarah M. Horrall, in: Idem, The Lyf of Oure Lady: The ME Translation of Thomas of Hales’ Vita Sancte Marie, Middle English Texts 17 (Heidelberg, 1985) [The work has survived in at least 16 manuscripts. Two others have been lost. Sarah Horrall (1986) has indicated that the manuscripts of this work were transmitted through religious houses (esp. Franciscans, Dominicans, Carthusians, Benedictines, Cistercians and Regular Canons. Thomas’ Vita is very encyclopaedical and compiles passages from no less than 47 different sources by at least 27 different writers. At the same time, the text exhibits a very emotional appeal, stressing emotional responses to religious events. Horrall (1986), 296 suggests that ‘Thomas is in fact writing almost exactly the same kind of work as the slightly later and enormously influential Meditationes vitae Christi…’]

The one surviving anglo-norman meditative sermon ‘secundum Fratrem Thomam a Hales’: MS Oxford, St. John’s College 190, has been edited by M. Dominica Legge, ‘The Anglo-Norman Sermon of Thomas of Hales’, Modern Language Review 30 (1935), 212-218.

literature

Fabricius, IV, 235; Wadding, Scriptores, 216; Sbaralea, Supplementum III, 129-130; DHGE XXIII, 135-136; DSpir XV, 816-817; Victorin Doucet, ‘Maitres franciscains de Paris: Supplément au Répertoire (…) de P. Glorieux’, AFH 27 (1934), 536-537; G. d’Angelo, ‘Poesia francescana inglese prima di Geoffrey Chaucer’, AFH 75 (1982), 338-341 & Franciscan Studies 43 (1983), 235-239; James W. Earl, ‘The ‘Luue-Ron’ of Thomas of Hales’, in: Magister Regis. Studies in Honor of Robert Earl Kaske, ed. Emerson Brown Jr., Giuseppe F. Mazzotta, Thomas D. Hill, Joseph S. Wittig & Arthur Groos (New York, 1986), 195-205; Ian Bishop, ‘Lapidary formulas as topics of invention - from Thomas of Hales to Henryson’, The Review of English Studies N.S. 37 (1986), 469-477; S.M. Horrall, ‘Thomas of Hales. His Life and Works’, Traditio 42 (1986), 286-298; Elaine Golden Robison, ‘Thomas of Hales’, Dictionary of The Middle Ages XII (1989), 35; Sharpe, Handlist, 659.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Herenthals (d. 1530)

OFMObs. Probably born at Herenthals in Brabant, ca. 1480. After his entrance in the Franciscan order (provincia Flandriae), he became active as guardian and theology lector in the Franciscan friary of Ypres. In addition, he became a rather successful preacher and religious educator of the local youth. On the Sunday after New Year’s day 1519 (1520 according to the new calendar), Thomas preached at the St. Martin church inYpres (he might have preached there at regular intervals). On that particular occasion, he warned against the dangers of Luther’s doctrines. Therewith, Thomas was one of the first public critics of Luther. Thomas died in the Herenthal convent on 29 December 1530, after a long illness. The ancient Liber defunctorum Fratrum ac benefactorum Conventus Iprensis says in this context: ‘Die 29 Decembris 1530, obitus piae memoriae venerabilis Patris fratris Thomae de Herentals, Sacerdos, Praedicator, Confessarius, huius conventus quondam Guardianus ac etiam Juvenum director sollicitus, qui tandem Lector existens in hoc conventu in medio vitae suae cursu languore diutino extenuatus diem clausit extremum, sepultus vero ante capitulum sub lampade quadrato. Anno 1530.’ [the original obituary was lost during the first world war. A nineteenth-century copy stil exists in the archives of the Franciscan friary of St. Trond. Cf. for this the studies of De Troeyer, 1963, 30, no. 1 & Vandenpeereboom, 1882, 243-245, from which studies I derived my citation.] He was a significant spiritual and catechetical author, famous for his Den Speghel des Kersten Levens, which consists of three texts, namely Tverclaers van den X geboden (finished on 29 July, 1529), een Cort verclaers op dat Pater noster, and Dat verklaers van den seven sacramenten (finished on 10 September, 1530). Thomas had meant to publish these texts and to have them distributed widely among families and schools, in order to establish proper catechistic instruction, so that heresies, ignorance and false beliefs could be battled effectively. He died before this plan could be realised. After his death, the treatises were edited and published together for him by Frans Titelmans as Den Speghel des Kersten Levens (1532).

editions

Den Speghel des Kersten Levens. Beslutende tverclaers vanden thien gheboden gods ende vanden .vij. sacramenten der heleger kercken, also verre alst den ghemeenen kerstenen noot est te ghelooven ende profijt te weten om metten ghewercken te beleven, ed. F. Titelmans (Antwerp: Simon Cock, 1532). [Den Speghel received ten editions between 1532 and 1569. It is a proper Catechism for adults, providing an exposition of the ten articles of faith, the Pater Noster, and the seven sacraments. It is clearly also written to provide the christian populace at large with an antidote against Lutheran ideas. The prologue therefore states: ‘Ende es dit selve boecxken leerende wat een yeghelijc goet kersten mensche behoort te weten nopende de geboden gods ende de .vij. sacramenten der heleger kercken ende hoe dat hi naard bewijs van dyen kerstelijc leven sal, alsoot van god ende van ons moeder de helege kercke elckerlijc geleert ende bevolen es…’ In its first edition, it contains (after a commendatio by Titelmans and the prologue by Thomas) Een cort onderwijs omtrent den Gods thien geboden; een seer cort verclaers op dat Pater noster; een cort verclaers van den seven sacramenten. The first part is not as short as the title does suggest. After a rather thorough chapter on the nature and the importance of the ten commandments (with recourse to the biblical theme ‘si vis ad vitam ingredi, serva mandata’ (Matthew 19, 17), a general chapter on the obligations imposed by the precepts of the ten commandments (chapter two, heavily indebted to Bonaventure’s sermon De Praeceptis), a chapter on the lack of adherence to the commandments (which is presented not simply as a danger to our soul, but also is presented as a lack of love, a lack of thankfulness and a sin in itself), and a chapter on the way in which christians should every day engage in prayer exercises, in order to reach a state of grace and purgation, Thomas moves on to a treatment of the individual commandments (always dealing with three main points: ‘Deerste puntken sal segghen wat elck ghebot es. Tweetste wat dat ghebot ons es eeschende ende water toe dattet ons verbindt. Tderde in wat manieren van sonden wi daer teghen misdoen.’). The seer cort verclaers op dat Pater noster is attached to the treatment of the tenth commandment, and is seen to be a natural extension of the commandments, namely as Christ’s commandment to pray. The intrinsic link between the Pater Noster and the Ten Commandments also shows in the fact that the subsequent treatment of the seven sacraments is presented as the second (and not the third) part of the work: ‘Hier volcht dat tweetste deel van dit speghel oft hantboecxken des kerstelijcke levens. Te weten een cort verklaers vanden seven sacramenten der helegher kercken.’ The sacraments are presented as the instruments of man’s sanctification. Thomas starts with a general chapter on the nature and institution of the sacraments, which reaches back to the sacramental teachings of Bonaventure, Scotus and Gabriel Biel. For each and every sacrament Thomas subsequently deals with its signification for our Christian life, its salutary sanctifying effects, and the way in which (or proper conditions under which) it should be received. The sacraments of baptism, eucharist, marriage, and (particularly) penitence receive most attention (predominantly based on Biel and (to a lesser extent) on Bonaventure). Through the sacrament of penitence, Christ forgives us our frequent lapses and acts of ingratitude, and reconciles our soul with God. The chapter on the sacrament of ordination (‘Tpriesterschip’) stresses the intercessory role of priests and their special status in this world: they alone can offer the eucharist and have the sacramental power to absolve sins (important issues in the struggle with the Lutherans). For the third edition (Antwerp, 1533), Titelmans also added a more detailed table of contents. This edition also included another work by Herentals, namely the Thien artikelen nopende tghemeyne heylige kersten gheloove, as well as an explanatory word list by Titelmans (Declaratie von sommige woorden in dit boecxken). This explantory word list also includes a defense of Thomas’ interpretation of the story of Moses getting water from the rocks). The first of these works is a genuine work of Thomas based on his sermons in the St. Martin's church of Ypres in 1519/20 (1520 according to te modern style). This work would have been published as early as 1520, and is a clear Catholic declaration of faith, with clear information on the sacraments, free will, and the merits of good works, directed against Luther (who is not mentioned by name). This would make it the first published statement of Catholic doctrine in the face of Lutheranism. Yet the version included in the 1533 edition of Den Speghel seems to be the oldest surviving witness.

In the prologue of the Den Speghel des Kersten Levens Thomas Herentals also refers to another work, namely the Corte declaracie van den thien gheboden. This Corte declaracie had been printed at Bruges without Thomas’ consent (sonder syn weten uut sinen [that is, Herentals’] sermonen gheraept te brugghe in prenten onder sinnen name uut ghegeven. Waer in hi bevindt vele saken achterghelaten, dier nootsakelijck an behooren, ende vele saken anders ghestelt dant rechtvaerdelijc om simpel menschen te leeren naer ons gheloove wel betaemt, sonderlinghe in tijden als quade valsche leeringen ende ketterijen op risen, als wi nu in onsen tiden sien, god betert.) This text apparently had been in circulation after Thomas’ renowned 1519/1520 sermons on the Ten Commandments at Ypres (which formed the basis of the text) and amount to a short declaration of Catholic faith (with special attention for the sacraments, the role of free will, and the importance of good works), clearly directed against Lutheran ideas (although Luther’s name is not mentioned). This, then, would be the unautorized version of the work issued with the author's permission as the Thien artikelen nopende tghemeyne heylige kersten gheloove.

Christianae Vitae Speculum F. Thomae Herentalini, Nicolao Zegero Interprete, ed. Nicholas Tacitus Zegers (Antwerp: Simon Cock, 1549 & Cologne: Erven Arnold Birckmann, 1555). [Latin version of Den Speghel des kersten Levens. Available via Google Books.

literature

A. Vandenpeereboom, ‘Les Frères Mineurs Franciscains, leur couvent et leur église à Ypres’, Ypriana 6 (Bruges, 1882), 241-320; A. Troelstra, De toestand der Catechese in Nederland gedurende de vóór-reformatorische eeuw (Groningen, 1901), 50, 61, 70-71, 102, 120, 144, 205-207; J. Goyens, ‘Thomas de Hérenthals’, Biographie nationale (Brussels, 1930) XXV, 34-36; D. van Heel, ‘De Minderbroeder Thomas van Herentals’, Bijdragen voor de Geschiedenis van de provincie der Minderbroeders in de Nederlanden 7 (1951), 75-85; DSpir V, 1386 & DSpir VII, 279; B. De Troeyer, ‘Thomas Herentals’, Franciscana 18 (1963), 30-34; Nationaal Biografisch Woordenboek II, 322-324; B. De Troeyer, Bio-Bibliographia Franciscana Neerlandica Saeculi XVI, I: Pars Biographica (Nieuwkoop, 1969), 47-50; Adriaan Pattin, ‘Thomas de Hérenthals’, Franziskanische Studien 65 (1983), 205-214.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Jorz (d. 1310)

Friar; Cardinal

manuscripts

>>>>> 

literature

>>>> 

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Montalvo (d. 1735)

OFMDisc. Spanish friar. Canonist and historian. Lector of theology and provincial of the province of St. Peter of Alcántara (Granada).

editions

Glossa Fundamentalis Statutorum Familiae Cismontanae, 2 Vols. (Madrid, 1740); Glosa Erudita a las Constituciones de la Provincia de Granada de San Pedro de Alcantára (Granada, 1703).

literature

AIA 23 (1925), 106; AIA 28 (1927), 99, 106; A. López, ‘Notas de bibliografía franciscana’, Archivo Ibero-Americano 32 (1929), 30-35; P. Borges, DHGE III, 1725; Lorenzo Loste Echeto, ‘Fr. Tomás de Montalvo, defensor de los expósitos’, Publicaciones ‘Al servicio de Españay del niño espanol’ 17:200 (Madrid, 1954); AIA 24 (1964), 293-294; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 150 (no. 586).

 

 

 

 

Thomas Martini de Montefortino (Tommaso Martini da Montefortino, 1739-c. 1805)

OFMRef. Born on the slopes of Monte Lepini, baptized as Francesco Martini. Entered the Friars Minor in the Roman province in the San Francesco da Ripa friary in 1755, taking the name Tommaso and making his profession at Fontecolombo di Rieti in 1756. Ordained priest in 1763 in Bagnoregio. Diffinitor in 1777. Also active as custodian, librarian in the Ripa friary and order historian. In that last capacity, he wrote his two-volume Annali della Riformata Provincia Romana (1767-1791). Active in the Ripa friary during the French occupation of 1798-1800. Tommaso wrote about that in his Diario and in his Cronaca of the Ripa monastery.

manuscripts/editions

Diario 1798-1800. Cronaca 1798-1800, ed. & trans. L.S. Mecocci (Priverno: Comunità dei Monti Lepini e Ausoni, 2005). See AFH 99 (2006), 391f.

Annali della Riformata Provincia Romana 1767-1791>> remained a manuscript.

Monumenti della biblioteca di S. Francesco da Ripa>> remained a manuscript.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Salzburg (d. 1463)

OFMObs

literature

Biographisch-Biographisches Kirchenlexikon XX, >>>

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Sancto Donato (Tommaso da San Donato in Val Comino, † 1648)

>>>Disciple of Jeremiah of Walachia

literature

Sisto Ambrosino, Fra Tommaso da San Donato in Val Comino. Un contemplativo per le strade di Napoli, Tau. Testi e ricerche di francescanesimo, 3 (Napoli, Editrice Campania Serafica, 2000).

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Sancto Josepho (Tomás de San José/Tomás de Madrid, d. 1708)

OFMDisc. Member of the San José province.

literature

AIA 21(1924), 295-296; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 184 (no. 824).

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Storlitis († 1341)

Baccalaureus in Bologna. Active in the Bologna friary since 1298. Elected provincial minister of Bologna in 1320. Present at the general chapter of Perusia, where he signed the pamflet De Paupartate Christi et Apostolorum Eius. In december 1324 sent to Farrara by pope John XXII to inspect the Benedictine and Clarisian monasteries. According to his testament, he owned several manuscript books.

editions

literature

C. Piana, Chartularium, AF, 11 (1970), 11-12, n. 16, II.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Tolentino (ca. 1260-1321)

Friend of Angelo Clareno. Missionary in the East. Author?

literature

AASS, Aprilis I (1886), 5-56; Golubovich, BBB II, 70-71, 110-112; II, 211-213; Anal. Boll. 61 (1943), 5-28.

 

 

 

 

Thomas de Whapela (d. ca. 1303)

Franciscan friar. Active in Oxford (1292) and London (1297)

manuscripts

Sermones de Sanctis: Worcester Cathedral Q. 46 f. 98r & Oxford, New College 92 f. 73r

literature

Little-Pelster, 77, 62etc.; Emden, Oxford, 2029-2030; Schneyer, V, 711

 

 

 

 

Thomas de York (d. ca. 1260)

English friar. Born around 1220. Joined the order around 1245, and probably studied liberal arts in the London friary, and possibly completed a lectorate course before he was sent to Oxford degree program before or around 1249 [Cf. letter of Adam Marsh, Monumenta Franciscana, ed. J.S. Brewer (London, 1858), 357 (letter 198)]. During his studies he also was for a time part of the episcopal household of Grosseteste, then Bishop of Lincoln. He became the fourth regent lector of the Franciscan general studium at Oxford. He reigned as theology master between 1253 and 1256 [his first magisterial lecture given on 14 March 1253]. There was considerable commotion around his inception,as the secular masters tried to stop his elevation to the chair of theology, as he had not obtained a master in the liberal arts at the university (part of the secular-mendicant controversy). Thanks to careful lobbying by Adam Marsh and others, these problems were resolved. After his Oxford regency, he was also active as regent lector at Cambridge (between 1256-1257) [Cf. Eccleston, Tractatus de Adventu Fratrum Minorum, ed. A.G. Little (Manchester, 1951), 51. For his connections with Adam Marsh, see also J.S. Brewer, Monumenta Franciscana, Rolls Series 4 (1858) I, 340-341, 352-352]. Thomas was a prolific author. Compiled ca. 1245 his large Summa (Sapientiale) and shortly thereafter his Comparatio Sensibilium. Defender of the ontological proof of God, divine illumination as source for secure knowledge, the plurality of forms, the beginning in time of the world (against radical aristotelianism). Famous for his 1256 defense (Manus Quae Contra Omnipotentem Extenditur) of the mendicants, their papally approved apostolate and their chosen form of mendicant life against the allegations of William of St. Amour. This treatise was the first of such defenses. Other texts of this kind were written by Bonaventure and Peckham, but by then he had died.

manuscripts

Summa (Sapientiale: on Metaphysics): Florence, Naz. Conv. Soppr. 437 A. 7ff. 1r-230v; BAV MS Vat.Lat. 4301 ff. 1r-194v & MS 6771 ff. 13r-221v, 238v-255v [Cf. A.G. Little, ‘The Franciscan School at Oxford’, in: Franciscan Papers, Lists, and Documents, 67-68; É. Longpré, ‘Fr. Thomas d’York OFM, La première somme métaphysique du XIIIe siècle’, AFH 19 (1926), 875-930 (includes a table of chapters on pp. 906-929). The work of Thomas is the first Summa on metaphysics in the 13th century. It consists of seven books. It probably was based on his university lectures and disputations on issues central in school discussions of the day concerning generation and becoming, individuation, universals, the nature of the soul, immaterial intelligences, and his solutions, which were sometimes rather original, in part built upon ideas earlier formulated by Grosseteste and also took new works of recently translated Arab and Jewish commentators into account (such as Averroes and Maimonides).]

Sermo de Morte Christi Cogitanda: Cambridge, Trinity College B.15.38 (373) ff. 201r-204v (Sermon on the Passion, which stresses the necessity of radical identification with the suffering Christ. Cf. the edition of Reilly)

Comparatio Sensibilium: Florence, Naz., MS Conv. Soppr. A.VI 437 ff. 230v-249v; Rome BAV, Vat.Lat. 4301 ff. 195r-v (13th cent., extract); Rome BAV Vat. Lat. 6771 ff. 221v-238v (13th cent.) [inc: ‘Comparatio sensibilium ad animam est sicut comparatio libri’]

Manus Quae Contra Omnipotentem Extenditur:

(?) Summa de Virtutibus

editions:

Manus Quae Contra Omnipotentem Extenditur, ed. M. Bierbaum, in: Bettelorden und Weltgeistlichkeit an der Universität Paris, Franziskanische Studien Beiheft 2 (Munich, 1930), 37-168

Sapientiale: Three chapters of book II (chapters four to six, on creation) of the Sapientiale have been edited by E. Longpré in Archive d’Hist. Doctr. et Litt. du Moyen Age 1 (1926), 268-293. Chapters 43 and 44 of book I, and chapters 19 to 22 of book VII have been edited by S. Vanni Rovighi, L’immortalità dell’anima nei maestri francescani del secolo XIII (Milan, 1936), 86-121, 285-348.

Sermo de Passione Christi, edited by J.P. Reilly, in Franciscan Studies 24 (1964), 205-222 [In this sermon, Thomas gives 17 reasons for fruitful meditation on the passion of Christ]

literature

LMA VIII, 727; DSpir XV, 890-891; Catholicisme XIV, 1216; F. Pelster, `Thomas von York als Verfasser des Traktats ‘Manus qui Contra Omnipotentem”, AFH 15 (1922), 3-22; A. Van den Wyngaert, ‘Querelles du clergé séculier et des Ordres mendiants à l’université de Paris’, La France Franciscaine 6 (1923), 49-53; É. Longpré, `Fr. Thomas d'York, OFM: la première somme metaphysique du XIIIe siècle', AFH 19 (1926), 875-930; A.G. Little, ‘The Franciscan School at Oxford in the Thirteenth Century’, AFH 19 (1926), 839-841; É. Longpré, `Thomas de York et Matthieu d'Acquasparta', AHDLMA 1(1926/7), 269-308; D.E. Sharp, `Franciscan Philosophy at Oxford in the Thirteenth Century', Franciscan Studies 16 (1930), 49-112; Cf. also S. Clasen, AFH 31 (1938), 276-329 & 32 (1939), 89-200; A.B. Emden, A Biographical Register of the University of Cambridge to 1500 (Cambridge, 1963), 666;J.P. Reilly, `A Sermon of Thomas of York on the Passion', Franciscan Studies 24 (1964), 205-222; C. Lohr, Traditio 29 (1973), 180; R. Lambertini, Apologia e crescità dell'identità francescana (1255/79), Nuovi Studi storici, 4 (Rome, 1990); J. Merino, Storia della filosofia francescana (1993); Sharpe, Handlist, 696; Andrew G. Traver, ‘Thomas of York’s role in the conflict between Mendicants and Seculars at Paris’, Franciscan Studies 57 (1999), 179-202; David Porreca, 'Hermes Trismegistus in Thomas of York: A 13th-Century Witness to the Prominence of an Ancient Sage', Archives d'histoire doctrinale et littéraire du moyen âge 72 (2005), 147-275; Luis Alberto De Boni, ‘Tomás de York (d. 1260) sobre a eternidade do mundo’, in: Idade média: Tempo de mundo, tempo de homens, tempo de Deus, ed. José António de Camargo Rodrigues de Souza (Porto Alegre, Brazil: EST Edições, 2006), 93-100; Stephen F. Brown, 'Thomas of York (ca. 1210-ca. 1260)', in: Historical Dictionary of Medieval Philosophy and Theology (2007), 279; Séamus Mulholland, ‘The Oxford Tradition on the Eve of Duns Scotus (1229-1288)’, in: A Pilgrimage Through the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition,ed. André Cirino & Josef Raischl (Canterbury: Franciscan International Study Centre, 2008), 117-144; Fiorella Retucci & Joseph Ward Goering, 'The "Sapientiale" of Thomas of York, OFM: The Fortunes and Misfortunes of a Critical Edition', Bulletin de philosophie médiévale 52 (2010), 133-159.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Dochingus (Thomas Docking/Thomas Good/ d. ca. 1270)

English Friar Minor and theologian. He was born Born at Docking (Norfolk). He possibly entered the order at Norwich in the late 1240s or early 1250s. In 1252/3, Adam Marsh wrote to the provincial minister to provide Docking with the Bible of a deceased friar, praising Docking’s learning (cd. The letters of Adam Marsh, ed. C.H. Lawrence). Docking studied at Oxford under Adam Marsh, Roger Bacon and became the seventh regent lector of the Oxford studium (between 1262 and 1265), as the successor of John of Wales. He stayed on in Oxford until 1269, when he was elected guardian of Norwich. He might have died the following year or shortly theerafter. Docking is first and foremost known as a biblical exegete and moral theologian with encyclopedic and classical tastes, much like John of Wales. His wrote commentaries on Deuteronomy, Isaiah, Job, Luke, and the Pauline Epistles, which were much read during his own lifeme and after, until they were more or less overshadowed by Nicholas of Lyra's Postilla litteralis. In the fifteenth century, his biblical works found new readers. His authorship of a commentary on the Apoclypse ascribed to him (Ms Oxford, Balliol College 149 (XV; Robertus Twart decani de Ankland) ff. 107-191v. [See also ff. 192-205 for the curious Moralitates quaedam super librum Apocalypsis, ad intellectum litterae pleniorem]) has been denied by A.G. Little on stilistic grounds (Little (1927), 301-311). Docking's Sentences commentary has not survived, but circulated during the medieval period. His commentary on the PosteriorAnalytica and his book on biblical grammar likewise have not survived. Several of his works were cited by John Russel, William of Nottingham, John Lathbury, and William Woodford. The Bishop of Ely, William Gray, bishop of Ely (d. 1478), organised the copying of Docking's works for his library. Docking took part in the poverty controvery and was surprisingly critical of the veneration of statues and images in churches.

manuscripts

Reportatio in Lucam: London Brit. Library, Royal 4 A. XIII (late thirteenth cent.)

Comm. super Deuteron.: Lincoln Dean and Chapter 229 (fragments/extracts, 14th cent.) [in all 5 extant MSS?

Postillae: Oxford Balliol 28-30.

In Isaiam:>> [in all two mss?]

In Job:>>

In Epistolas:>>

Check Stegmüller!

literature:

Wadding, Scriptores, 215; Sbaralea, Supplementum III. 125-126; A.G. Little, Franciscan Papers, Lists and Documents (Manchester, 1943), 98-121; Idem, `Thomas Docking and his Relations to Roger Bacon', Essays in History (Manchester, 1927), 301-311;Stegmüller, RB. V. no. 8111; A.B. Emden, A Biographical Register of the University of Oxford. I (Oxford, 1957), 580; RBMA, 5 (..), 356-361; B. Smalley, The Study of the Bible>>>; R.A.B. Mynors (ed.), Catalogue of the Manuscripts of Balliol College Oxford (Oxford, 1963), 130-135; J.I. Catton, `New Light on Thomas Docking', Medieval and Renaissance Studies 6 (1968), 135-149; The History of the U. of Oxford, I: The Early Oxford Schools; R. Lambertini, `Momenti della formazione dell'identità francescana (1255-1279)', in: Atti del XVIII Convegno internazionale Assisi (Assisi, 1992), 125-172; Johannes Madey, ‘Thomas Good von Docking’, Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XVII, 1370f; Monika Rappenecker, ‘Thomas Gude (Good) v. Docking’, Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche 3 IX, 1527f.; Jenny Swanson, ‘Docking, Thomas of (d. c.1270)’, in: Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004; http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/7723); Bert Roest, Franciscan Learning, Preaching and Mission c. 1220-1650: Cum scientia sit donum Dei, armatura ad defendendam sanctam Fidem catholicam... (Leiden: Brill, 2014), 88.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Eboracensis

manuscripts

Sapientiale: BAV, Vat.Lat. 4301 & 6771 [Thomas de Eboraco? See Etzkorn, IVF, 117]

editions

Sapientiale, ed. in prep. by Virginia Brown

 

 

 

 

Thomas Eccleston (gest. ca. 1260)

English friar minor since c. 1229/32. Student in Oxford and at least for some time a member of the London friary (sometime between c. 1240-1254). Betwen 1259 and 1261, he wrote the early history of his order province in a more or less thematically organised work of fifteen chapters or Collationes, known as the Tractatus de adventu Fratrum Minorum in Angliam. The work deals with the years 1224-258. The thirteenth Collatio in particular provides much information on the early years, as it also deals with the succession of minister generals and the conflicts between Elias and Giovanni Parenti. It is not a ‘chronicle’ in the strict sense of the word, but more a multi-layered edifying treatise (On the character of the work, see also the work of Roest (1996) and Kehnel (2005 & 2010)), yet it contains a lot of apparently reliable information on the early settlement history of and educational developments in the ENglish order province until 1258.

manuscripts

Tractatus de Adventu Minorum in Angliam: MS British Library, Egerton 3133 (fragment, see: A.G. Little, ‘The Lamport Fragment of Eccleston and its Connections’, English Historical Review 49 (1934), 299-302); British Library, Cotton Nero A.IX. f.75 (fragment); Cheltenham, Thirlestaine House Philipps 3119 f. 71; York, Minster XVI.K.4. It would seem that there is a depency between the Cheltenham-Philipps manuscript and those in the Egerton and Cotton Nero collection. Yet ultimately all manuscripts seem to go back to to a now lost original.

editions

A first edition appeared in The Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages published (…) under the direction of the Master of the Rolls, ed. J.S. Brewer, Monumenta Franciscana, I (London, 1858) (based on the York and Cotton manuscript, not always very reliable); An edition of the newly discovered fragment of the Lamport manuscript (later entered as BL, Egerton 3133) was provided by Richard Howlett in Monumenta Franciscana II (with a better text of the chronicle in sofar as covered by the fragment); Analecta Franciscana I (Quaracchi, 1885), 215-275. This text is based on Brewer and Howlett without re-examining the manuscripts; Parts of the text were edited by Dr.Liebermann in the Monumenta Germaniae Historica Scriptores XXVIII (Hannover-Leipzig, 1888), 560-569, for which edition the Cotton and York manuscripts were collated afresh; A.G. Little (ed.) Tractatus Fratris Thomae vulgo dicti de Eccleston, De Adventu Fratrum Minorum in Angliam, Collection d'études et de documents sur l'histoire religieuse et littéraire du Moyen Age, tome vii (Paris, 1909), based on the Cotton, Cheltenham-Philipps, and York manuscripts as well as on Howlett’s transcript of the Lamport (later Egerton) fragment; Fratris Thomae vulgo dicti de Eccleston Tractatus de Adventu Fratrum Minorum in Angliam, ed. A.G. Little (Manchester: Manchester UP, 1951).This is a new, improved edition.

translations

The Coming of the Friars Minor to England and Germany, being the Chronicles of Brother Thomas of Eccleston and Brother Jordan of Giano, trans. G. Salter (Dent, 1926); Nach Deutschland und England. Die Chroniken der Minderbrüder Jordan von Giano und Thomas von Eccleston, L. Hardick (Werl, 1972); Sur les routes d’Europe>>>; Other English translations>>>

literature

Sbaralea, Supplementum III, 126-127; A.G. Little, Franciscan Papers, Lists, and Documents (Manchester, 1943), 25-28; Gransden, Historical Writing in England c. 550 to c. 1307 (London, 1974) I, 553; S. da Campagnola, Le origine francescane come problema storiografico (Perugia, 1974), 28-29, 53-54; Armando Quaglia, ‘Tommaso da Eccleston e la Regola francescana’, Studi Francescani 87 (1990), 261-264; Bert Roest, Reading the Book of History (Groningen: Regenboog, 1996), Roest, Reading the Book of History, Chapter VI & passim; Dieter Berg, ‘Thomas von Eccleston, OFM (13.Jh.)’, Lexikon des Mittelalters VIII (1997), 717; Annette Kehnel, ‘Die Formierung der Gemeinschaften der Minderen Brüder in der Provinz Anglia. Überlegungen zum Tractatus de adventu fratrum minorum in Angliam des Bruders Thomas von Eccleston’, in: Die Bettelorden im Aufbau. Beiträge zu Institutionalisierungsprozessen im mittelalterlichen Religiosentum, ed. Gert Melville & Jörg Oberste (Münster-Berlin: LIT Verlag, 1999), 493-524; Gabriele Zaccagnini, ‘Continuità e trasformazione dell'ideale francescano nel ‘De adventu. .. ’ di Tommaso da Eccleston’, in: Il francescanesimo a Pisa (secc. XIII - XIV) e la missione del Beato Agnello in Inghilterra a Canterbury e Cambridge: (1224 - 1236); atti del convegno di studi, Pisa, Chiesa di San Francesco, 10 - 11 marzo 2001, ed. Ottavio Banti (Felici, 2003), 49-72; Annette Kehnel,‘The narrative tradition of the medieval Franciscan friars on the British Isles. Introduction to the sources’, Franciscan Studies 63 (2005), 461-530 (esp. 477-481); Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, 9 Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) XI/3-4, 180f; Franziskus-Quellen. Die Schriften des Heiligen Franziskus, Lebensbeschreibungen, Chroniken und Zeugnisse über ihn und seinen Orden, ed. Dieter Berg, Leonhard Lehmann et al., Zeugnisse des 13. und 14. Jahrhunderts zur Franziskanischen Bewegung, Band 1 (Kevelaer: Butzon & Bercker, Ed. T. Coelde, 2009), esp. J. Schneider, ‘Thomas von Eccleston, Chronik’, 1012-1082; Annette Kehnel, ‘Der mendikantische Konvent: Lokale Schaltstelle einer universalen Kommunikationsgemeinschaft. Überlegungen zum Aufbau und zur Textstruktur des Tractatus de adventu fratrum Minorum in Angliam von Thomas von Eccleston (1258/9)’, in: Franciscan Organisation in the Mendicant Context. Formal and informal structures of the friars' lives and ministry in the Middle Ages, ed. Michael Robson & Jens Röhrkasten, Vita Regularis: Ordnungen und Deutungen religiosen Lebens im Mittelalter, 44 (Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2010), 179-224; Marco Bartoli & Alfonso Marini, Da Assisi al mondo. Storie e riflessioni del primo secolo francescano (Trapani: Il pozzo di Giacobbe, 2010). With essays on the early history of the order, the Chronicle of Giordano da Giano, the nature and sources of the Tractatus e adventu fratrum minorum of Thomas Eccleston, issues pertaining to the Sacrum Commercium and the Actus beati Francisci.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Franciscus de Urrutigoiti (Tomás Francés Urrutigoiti, fl. c. 1660)

OFM. Theologian in the Aragon province.

literature

AIA 15 (1955), 287-289; AIA 22 (1962), 373; José Simón Díaz, Bibliografía de la literatura hispánica, 11 Vols. (Madrid, 1960-1976) X, nos. 2501-2528; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 115 (no. 317).

 

 

 

 

Thomas Illyricus (Tommaso da Osimo, 1484 - 1528)

OMObs. Born in Vrana (near Zadar in Dalmatia). Emigrated with his parents to Osimo in the March of Ancona. Spent his youth in the countryside, working in the fields and herding goats. Was admitted by the Observant friars of Osimo. Spent several years in isolated Observant friaries. After he had become priest at the age of 25, Tommaso began to preach in neighbouring villages. Embarked several times on pilgrimages to Santiago da Compostella (1515, 1518-1522). In between, he continued to preach, not only in the countyside of the March of Ancona, but also in larger urban centres, like Genoa, Parma, Rimini, Pesaro, and Ragusa, and in addition in several french towns. Apparently also travelled to the Holy Land (1515- May 1516; subsidized by the urban authorities of Ragusa). During his second trip to Spain, Tommaso preached along the way in many Spanish and French towns (including Aix, Grenoble, Toulouse, Nérac, Montauban, Cahors, Villefranche de Rouergue, Condom, Bordeaux, Foix, Geneva). On the way back, he spent again some time preaching in Southern France, where he also established a hermitage (in a region called La Teste de Buch, near Arcachon). By 1522, Tommaso was back in Northern Italy (Piedmonte and Turin). In Turin, he composed his first anti-lutheran work. On 18 January 1527, pope Clement VII made him general inquisitor for the struggle against the Lutherans and the Waldensians in the Savoy Duchy. Tommaso nevertheless continued his life as itinerant preacher on the Mediterranean coast (Monaco, Nice, etc.). He died at the end of 1528, during a solitary evening meditation, and was buried in the convent church of Notre Dame de Carnolès.

Tommaso has left a series of works, ranging from sermons and letters to apologetical works directed against Lutherans and other ‘schismatics.’ In these latter writings, he is not solely concerned with defending traditional Catholicism against Lutheran criticism, but urges for a reform that would enable the church to return to its evangelical purity. R. Darricau, ‘Thomas Illyricus’, Catholicisme XIV, 1212: ‘Il occupe une place importante dans le puissant mouvement de renouveau spirituel qui, depuis le début du xve s., s’efforçait de guérir l’Europe de sa crise morale et religieuse. À ce titre il compe parmi ceux qui, bien avant le concile de Trente, ont préparé les voies à la Réforme catholique.’

editions

Litterae.Epistolae (Toulouse: Jean Febvre, 1519) [a small collection, composed either in Toulouse or in La Teste de Buch, containing a letter to the Senate of Toulouse on defending the name of Jesus (7 February, 1519), a letter to the students of Toulouse University (16 August 1519), a letter directed to the faithful ‘de ordine servando in matrimonio ac de laudibus matrimonii’ (15 February, 1519), and an undated letter to the soldiers of the French king (‘ad milites sub rege Francorum christianissimo militantes, pro salute animarum suarum, cum quibusdam regulis ac ordinibus, directa.’), providing spiritual counsel for the salvation of their souls. On this collection and the individual ‘letters’, see also the works of Gelcich, Mauriac, Bacotich, and Godfroy below]

Testamentum(Toulouse, 1520) [composed on 26 April 1519]

Littera ad Omnes Christifideles contra Hypocritas (Limoges, 1520).

Epistola ad Ragusanos de Invicem Habenda Caritate: MS BAV, Lat. 6894 (6989) f. 4. (reference found in Mauriac, (1925), 384.)

Sermones Aurei (Toulouse, 1521) [50 sermons held in Toulouse: 25 on Christ and 25 on Mary. The edition is based on a transcript made by Tommaso’s secretary and fellow friar Masseo Bruna de Frossasco. Cf. also also the works of Gelcich, Mauriac, Bacotich, and Godfroy below]

Libellus de Potestate Summi Pontificis (…)qui Intitulatur Clipeus Status Papalis (Turin, 1523) [work of seven apologetical treatises, attacking abuses in the church. Two of the treatises are in fact works by Jean Gerson, (namely the Casus Septem in Quibus Pontifex est Auferibilis de Papatu and the Modus se Habendi Tempore Schismatis). Another treatise, the Invectiva contra Malos Christianos also is heavily dependent upon a work by Gerson (namely Gerson’s Declaratio Defectuum Virorum Ecclesiasticorum). In between these reform treatises, Tommaso also inserted an anti-Lutheran sermon on the clavis Petri. The volume starts with four dedicatory letters, repectively to pope Adrianus VI (dated Turin, 12 November 1522), to Charles III, Duke of Savoye (dated Turin, 12 November 1522), to the people of Lyon (dated Irigny, 22 February 1522), and to John of Lorraine, the bishop of Valencia (dated 12 May, 1522)]

In Lutherianas Hereses Clipeus Catholicae Ecclesiae (Turin, 1524) [Treatise on the sacraments of the Church, and directed against the mistakes of Luther and his partisans. The work also contains dedicatory letters to pope Clement VII and to the bishop Augustine Grimaldi. The 1524 edition is available via Google Books.]

S’ensuyt l’epistre de fr. Thomas Illyric(…) à tous les chrétiens sur le mariage (Poitiers, s.d. c. 1525) [A translation of the letter published in Toulouse (1519)?]

Le sermon de charité (Saint-Nicolas du Port, 1525) [Anti-Lutheran sermon]

Devotes Oraisons (Paris, 1528) [prayers and songs ‘pour induire et inciter le peuple à devotion’]

Prophétie faicte par frère Thomas Iliric [translation of an alleged Italian prophecy of Thomas Illyricus], published in Brunet, Manuel du Libraire (Paris, 1864) V, 832.

To Thomas are also ascribed a Tractatus de Conceptione Virginis, which in all probability is an extract from sermo 26 of the Sermones Aurei collection.

Quadragesimales Conciones et Adventus >>ascribed to him by Sbaralea.

literature

Wadding, Annales Minorum XVI, 112-115, 771-778; Sbaralea, Supplementum III, 130-131;P. Delpuech, Histoire de Notre Dame d’Arcachon et du Bx Thomas Illyricus, son fondateur (Bordeaux, 1872); G. Gelcich, Fra Tommaso Illirico detto da Osimo. Appunti biografico-critici (Spalato, 1903); B. Rode, ‘Documenti Francescani di Ragusa’, Miscellanea Francescana 15 (1914), 178-180 & Miscellanea Francescana 16 (1914), 44-45; R.M.-J. Mauriac, ‘Nomenclature et description sommaire des oeuvres de Fr. Thomas Illyricus OFM’, AFH 18 (1925), 374-385; R.M.-J. Mauriac, ‘Une enquête en vue de la béatification de Fr. Thomas Illyricus OFM’, AFH 24 (1931), 513-522; R.M.-J. Mauriac, ‘Un réformateur catholique, Thomas Illyricus’, Études Franciscaines 46 (1934), 329-347, 434-456, 584-604 & 47 (1935), 58-71 [edited separately at Paris, 1935]; A. Bacotich, ‘Degli scritti a stampa e della vita di fra Tommaso Illirico (1450-1528)’, Archivio storico per la Dalmazia (Rome, 1931), 1-14; A. Rebsonnen, Notre Dame d’Arcachon (Bordeaux, 1937); DThCat XV, 777-778; Martyrologium Franciscanum (Vicenza, 1939), 178; G. Cantini, I Francescani d’Italia di fronte alle dottrine luterane e calviniste durante il cinquecento (Rome, 1948), 50-69; D. Seilhan, ‘La vie ardente et tumultueuse de Fr. Thomas Illyricus, prémoniteur de la Réforme (Son passage à Montauban en 1518)’, Bulletin archéologique, historique et artistique de la Société archéologique de Tarn-et-Garonne 80 (1953), 132-175; Raymond Darricau, `Thomas Illyricus', Catholicisme XIV, 1211-1212; M.-F. Godfroy, Thomas Illyricus, prédicateur et théologien 1484-1528, thèse de doctorat à Toulouse (Toulouse-Le Mirail, 1984); M.-F. Godfroy, ‘Le prédicateur franciscain Thomas Illyricus à Toulouse (nov. 1518 - mai 1519)’, Annales du Midi 97 (1985), 101-114 [Cf. AFH 78 (1985), 533-535; J. Ragot, ‘Passage à Condom et à Nérac de Thomas Illyricus, ermite d’Arcachon’, Revue de l’Agenais. Bulletin de la Société académique d’Agen 102 (1985), 19-28; DSpir XV, 827-830; Franjo Sanjek, ‘Thomas Illyricus’, Lexikon für Theologie und Kirche 3 IX, 1530; Denis Crouzet, Les guerriers de Dieu (Paris: Seyssel Champvallon, 1990), 227, 524-526; M.F. Godfroy, ‘Vers la frontière: Thomas Illyricus‘, in: Les frontières religieuses en Europe du XVème au XVIIème siècles, Actes du 31ème colloque international du C.E.S.R., Tours, 1988 (Paris: Vrin, 1992), 88-96; Wilhelm Kohl, ‘Thomas Illyricus (1485-1528)‘, Biographisch-bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon XI (1996), 1388-1390; David Bryson, Queen Jeanne and the Promised Land: Dynasty, Homeland, Religion and Violence in Sixteenth-Century France (Leiden: Brill, 1999), 32-33, 85; Alain Cullière, ‘Le sermon de charité de Thomas Illyricus (Saint-Nicolas-de-Port, 1525)’, Le Pays Lorrain 90 (2009), 211-220.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Murner (1475-1537)

OFMConv. Born in Obernehnheim (Obernai, Alsace). Entered the order in his adolescent years. Priest in 1494. Studied artes in Freiburg (1495-1497), where he came into contact with humanism. Further studies at Paris and moved to Strasbourg as magister artium in 1499. Further studies and teaching activities in Cologne, Rostock, Cracow (where he was known as a baccalaureate in theology and taught logic), Prague, Vienna, Trier (where he held lectures on Roman Law), Basel (where he became Doctor in utriusque iure). Became master of theology around 1506. Further lectorships and guardianships traced for the convents of Freiburg (1509), Bern, Frankfurt (precher and lector/lesemeister, 1511-1513), Strasbourg (1502, 1513 (as guardian, until he was deposed because of bad management), 1520 (rector et regens fratrum minorum)) and Speyer (guardian in 1510). Had to depart from Strasbourg in 1524 because of the Reformation. Travelled to Obernehnheim, where he again had to leave in 1525 because of the 'Bauernkrieg'. Travelled to Luzern. In 1526, Thomas took part in the so-called `Badener Disputation'. Between 1527 and ca. 1532 in Luzern, thereafter active as parochial priest in Obernehnheim. Humanist tendencies (which show in his histories, translations and poems, and the fact that he became Poeta laureatus in 1505), anti-protestant author (controversies with Luther, Bucer, Zwingli in 1520, 1523), and satyrist in the tradition of Sebastian Brant and Erasmus. In Frankfurt (1511-1513), Thomas produced two of his large satyrical poems, namely the Schelmenzunft and the Narrenbeschwörung, which show close connections with his activities as popular preacher. Shortly after his Frankfurt period, he produced his more purely religious (and not satyrical) poem Geistliche Badenfahrt, which was meant both for meditative reading and for preaching purposes. Other important moral-satyrical poems of his hand are Die Gäuchmat, and Die Mühle von Schwyndelszheim. Mürner’s combination of popular satyre and religious education has been interpreted as a typical Franciscan (a.o. Landmann (1927), 327). Rather innovative seems to have been Murner's teaching of logic and law in Poland in and around 1506, which used mnemonic cards to facilitate the training in specific problems (see discussion by Sieber (1875), Stoffer & Thijs (1999), and Wojcik (2016) mentioned below).

editions

Oratio ad Capitulum Solodurense Anno MDII Facta (Strasbourg, 1502) [Text had been given as a sermo litteralis at the provincial chapter held at Solothurn (12 Juni, 1502). Its major themes are that man belongs to the Heavens rather than to earth, and that the leadership of the order province should be guided in their actions by the love of the Seraphim, the wisdom of the Cherubim, and the justice of the Thrones. It calls for reforms. To some extent, it is a polemic text, directed against Wimpfeling’s Germania.] Cf. also: Th. Von Liebenau, ‘Documenta quaedam circa vitam Fr. Thomas Murneri O.M.Conv.’, AFH 5 (1912), 727-736 & 6 (1913), 118-128 [gives the text on pp. 118-127].

Logica Memorativa/Chartiludium logicae (Cracow: Jan Haller, 1507/Strasbourg, 1509 &1518/Brussels, 1609/Paris, 1629). No extant copies survive of the first 1507 edition, yet the other editions show that this work had quite some impact.

Ludus Studentium Friburgensium cum Prophetia mirabilis in fine Mathias Hanbucellus (Frankfurt am M., 1511).(VD16 M 7039)

German translation of the Aeneis of Virgil and the Institutiones of Justinian

Germania Nova (Strasbourg, 1502) [historical work in which he attacked J. Wimpeling's view on the history of Alsace]

Tractatus Perutilis de Phitonico Contractu (Obernehnheim, 1499) [on paralysis and influence of witchcraft]

Narrenbeschwörung (a.o. Strasbourg, 1512). A new edition, together with Der Schelmen Zunft, can be found in the series Neudrucken deutscher Literaturwerke des 16. Und 17. Jahrhunderts, ed. M Spanien (Halle, 1894 (Narrenbeschwörung) & 1912 (Schelmenzunft)).

Der Schelmen zunfft. Anzeigung alles weltleuffigen mutwils, Schalckheiten und bieberyen diser zeyt, Durch den hochgelerten herren doctor Thomas Murner von Straszburg, schimpfflichener dichtet und zu Franckfurt an dem meyn mit ernstlichem fürnemen gepredigt (Frankfurt: Batt Murner, 1512/Strasbourg, 1512/Augsburg, 1513/etc.). For an overview of further editions, see Landmann,‘Zum Predigtwesen …’, Franziskanische Studien 14 (1927), 324-325, note 102& 103.

Ein andechtig geistliche Badenfart des hochgelerten Herren Thomas Murner, der heiligen geschrifft doctor barfüsserorden zu Straszburg, in dem bad erdicht, gelert und ungelerten nutzlich zu bredigen und zu lesen (Strasbourg: Johannes Grüninger, 1514/second edition ibidem, 1518) [It is a religious poem on justification for preaching and individual reading pruposes. Using the simile of the bath, every element of washing/cleansing the body is used to deal with an aspect of the inner cleansing of man through Christ. Landmann, Franziskanische Studien 14 (1927), 326 states:‘Mancher Abschnitt gehört, trotz der sonderbaren Einkleiding, zum Besten und Gefühlvollsten der Erbauungsliteratur des 16. Jahrhunderts.’]

Die Gäuchmat zu straff allen wybschen mannen durch den hochgelehrten herren Thomas Murner, der heiligen geschrifft doctor barfüsser orden zu Straszburg, erdichtet unnd eyner frummen gemein der löblichen statt Basel in freyden zu eyner letz beschriben und verlassen (Basel, 1519); Thomas Murner, Die Gäuchmatt, ed. W. Uhl (Leipzig, 1896). [As the Strasbourg magistrates forbade its publication, the work appeared in Basel. [Mixture of satyre and ‘Erbauung’, intending to provide readers with a mocking mirror of themselves, through which they can see in an inverted way important moral and religious truths. As the work was rather offending to some, Mürner thereafter produced the Mühle von Schwindelsheim, which left behind some of the more offensive invectives.]

Die Mühle von Schwyndelszheim und Grede Müllerin Jarzeit (Strasbourg: Matthis Hupfuff, 1515). A new edition by P. Albrecht, came out in Straßburger Studien. Zeitschrift für Geschichte, Sprache und Literatur des Elsasses 2 (1884). [The work deals in a comic fashion with the handicrafts of the miller and related anecdotes, connecting them with moral and religious lessons.]

Writings concerning the process against Johannes Jetzer (1509)>>

Von den großen lutheranischen Narren (Strasbourg, 1522)

Bärensatyren>>

German translation of the Humanist world chronicle of the Venetian Marcus Antonius Sabellicus (fasc. Edition: Karlsruhe, 1987).

Absage an die Luzerner Stadtväter aus dem Jahre 1535, ed. Hedwig Heger, in: Bibliothek und Wissenschaft (Wiesbaden) 27 (1994), 49-55.

Further edition of his vernacular writings:

Thomas Murners Deutsche Schriften, ed. F. Schultz, Meier Spanier et al., 9 Vols.(Strasbourg, 1918-1931/Berlin-New York, 1990). Volume 2 contains the Narrenbeschwörung and Volume 3 contains the Schelmenzunft.

literature

Ludwig Sieber, ‘Thomas Murner und sein juristiches Kartenspiel’, in: Beitrage zur vaterlandischen Geschichte Herausgegeben von der historischen Gesellschaft in Basel, 10 (Basel: H. Georg’s Buchhandlung, 1875), 273–316; Th. von Liebenau, Der Franziskaner Thomas Mürner (Freiburg, 1913); Fl. Landmann, ‘Zum Predigtwesen…’, Franziskanische Studien 14 (1927), 317-332; Adalbert Erler, Thomas Mürner als Jurist (Frankfurt, 1956); Handwörterbuch zur Deutschen Rechtsgeschichte III (Berlin, 1984), 793-795; Ausstattungskatalog Thomas Mürner, Elsässischer Theologe und Humanist, ed. Bad. Landesbibl. Karlsruhe-Bibl. Nat. et Univ. Strasbourg (Karlsruhe, 1987); Heribert Schmolinsky, Eine Persönlichkeit an der Zeitenwende: Thomas Murner zwischen Spätmittelalter und Moderne (Karlsruhe, 1988); D.V.N. Bagchi, Luther's Earliest Opponents (Minneapolis, 1989); Susanne M. Raabe, Der Wortschatz in den deutschen Schriften Thomas Murners (Berlin etc., 1989); Lily Greiner, ‘Thomas Murner (1475-1537), humaniste et thélogien alsacien’, in: Les pays de l'entre-deux au moyen âge. Questions d'histoire des territoires d'Empire entre Meuse, Rhône et Rhin. Actes du 113e Congrès national des Sociétés savantes, Strasbourg 1988 (Paris, 1990), 279-288; Marc Lienhard, ‘Thomas Murner et la Reformation’, in: Idem, Un temps, une ville, une réforme la Reformation à Strasbourg ; Studien zur Reformation in Straßburg (Aldershot: Variorum, 1990) XII, 51-62; Deutsche Dichter der frühen Neuzeit, ed. S. Füssel (Berlin, 1993), 296-310; Hedwig Heger, ‘Thomas Murners Absage an die Luzerner Stadtväter aus dem Jahre 1535’, Bibliothek und Wissenschaft 27 (1994), 49-55; Marc Lienhard, ‘Murner, Thomas’, Theologische Realenzyklopädie XXIII (Berlin, 1994), 436-438; Heribert Schmolinksy, ‘Murner, Thomas’, Biographish-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon VI (Herzberg, 1993), 366-369; Barbara Könneker, `Minnediensts Ende: Zur literar-historischen Bedeutung von Thomas Murners `Geuchmat’’, Jahrbuch der Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft 9 (1996/97), 385-401; M. Lienhard, `La controverse entre Murner et Bucer au sujet de la Sainte Cène', Revue d'Alsace, 122 (1996), 223-237; Historisches Wörterbuch der Rhetorik III, 1192-1196; Josef Pauser, “Welch Frevel! Jetzt erscheinen die kaiserlichen Edikte gar noch als Spielkarten.’ Thomas Murners juristisches Lehrkartenspiel über die ‘Institutionen’ Justinians’, Zeitschrift für neuere Rechtsgeschichte 18 (1996),196-225; Peter Ukena, ‘Murner, Thomas, Franziskaner, Satiriker, Humanist, * angeblich 24.12.1475 Oberehnheim (Obernay, Elsaß), † vermutlich zwischen 1.1. und 23.8.1537 Oberehnheim (Obernay, Elsaß)’, Neue Deutsche Biographie XVIII (Berlin, 1997), 616-617; LThK,VII (3rd ed., Freiburg, 1998), 540-541; Cecil H. Clough, ‘The Significance of the Illustrations in Thomas Murner's 1530s Translation into German of Sabellico's Enneades’, Mediaevalia 20 (1997); Manuel Stoffer & Pieter Thijs, ‘De Logica memorativa van Thomas Murner. Het eerste educatieve kaartspel en zijn publicatiegeschiedenis’, Jaarboek voor Nederlandse Boekgeschiedenis 5 (1998), 7-26; Manuel Stoffers, ‘A Question of Mentality: The changed appreciation of Thomas Murner's logical card game (c. 1500)’, in: Memory and Oblivion. Proceedings of the XXIXth International Congress of the History of Art held in Amsterdam, 1 - 7 September 1996, ed. Adriaan Wessel Reinink & Jeroen Stumpel (Amsterdam, 1999), 275-293; Eckhard Bernstein, ‘Murner, Thomas’, Encyclopedia of the Renaissance ed. Paul F. Grendler, 6 Vols. (New York, 1999) IV, 197-198; Irena Backus, ‘Augustine and Jerome in Thomas Murner's ‘Reformatio’ of 1509’, in: Auctoritas Patrum, 2: Neue Beiträge zur Rezeption der Kirchenväter im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert, ed. Leif Grane, Alfred Schindler & Markus Wriedt, 2 Vols. (Mainz, 1998) II, 13-25; Detlef Hofmann, ‘Die mnemonischen Kartenspiele Thomas Murners’, in: Seelenmaschinen: Gattungstraditionen, Funktionen und Leistungsgrenzen der Mnemotechniken vom späten Mittelalter bis zum Beginn der Moderne, ed. Jörg Jochen Berns & Wolfgang Neuber (Vienna etc., 2000), 585-604; Rebecca Oettinger, ‘Thomas Murner, Michael Stifel, and Songs as Polemic in the Early Reformation’, The Journal of Musicological Research 22 (2003), 45-100; Heribert Schmolinksy,‘Thomas Murner und die katholische Reform’, in: Idem, Im Zeichen von Kirchenreform und Reformation. Gesammelte Studien zur Kirchengeschichte in Spätmittelalter und Früher Neuzeit (Münster, 2005), 238-250; Dirk Jarosch, Thomas Murners satirische Schreibart: Studien aus thematischer, formaler und stilistischer Perspektive (Hamburg, 2006); Roman Fischer, ‘Thomas Murner in Frankfurt (1510-1513)’, Collectanea Franciscana 76,3-4 (2006), 505-522; Gregor Egloff, ‘Hug, Hans et Thomas Murner’, Dizionario storico della Svizzera VI, 607; Matthias Dell'Asta, ‘Gerbel (Musophilus), Nikolaus’, in: Deutscher Humanismus 1480-1520. Verfasserlexikon II (Berlin: De Gruyter, 2008), 904-924 (remarks on Thomas Murner on p. 920); Karin Waedt, ‘Kutte, Sti(e)fel, Narrenkappe: Der Flugschriftenstreit zwischen dem Esslinger Frühreformator Michael Stifel und dem Franziskaner Thomas Murner 1521-1523, in: Zwischen Himmel und Erde, Klöster und Pfleghöfe in Esslingen: eine Ausstellung der Städtischen Museen und des Stadtarchivs Esslingen am Neckar in der Franziskanerkirche Esslingen, 27. September 2009 bis 31. Januar 2010; Begleitpublikation im Namen der Stadt Esslingen am Neckar [Tagung ‘Kloster, Wirtschaft und Stadt im Spätmittelalter’, Esslingen, Altes Rathaus, 21. März 2009 (Petersberg, 2009), 237-242; ‘Thomas Murner’, in: Deutscher Humanismus 1480-1520. Verfasserlexikon, ed. Franz Josef Worstbrock 2, 1: L-M (Berlin-New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2009),299-320; Rainald Fischer, ‘Murner, Thomas, conv. (1475-1537)’, Diz. Stor. Svizzera 8 (2009), 815; Franz Josef Worstbrock, 'Murner, Thomas', in: Deutscher Humanismus 1480 - 1520. Verfasserlexikon II (2013), 299-368; Rafal Wojcik, 'The art of memory in Poland in the Late Middle Ages (1400–1530)', in: The Art of Memory in Late Medieval Central Europe (Czech Lands, Hungary, Poland), ed. Farkas Gabor Kiss (Budapest-Paris: L'Harmattan, 2016), 65-106 (esp. 76-79).

 

 

 

 

Thomas Otterbonus (eind 14e, begin 15e eeuw)

English Friar Minor and historian. He wrote for instance the De Successione Comitum Northumbriae and a Historia Rerum Anglicarum, which would have survived in amended form in the second part of the Lanercost Chronicle. This extant chronicle covers English history between 1201 and 1346. It contains Franciscan materials and subsequently was adapted and transformed at the Augustinian Lanercost Priory. According to A.G. Little, the section up to 1297 is the interpolated/transformed version of a now lost chronicle of the Franciscan Richard of Durham. The second part goes back to the activities of another Franciscan author with pronounced interests in siege equipment and military operations between the English and the Scots. Little identifies this second author with the Franciscan Thomas of Otterburn whose chronicle is mentioned in the Scalachronica. According to Little, the second author, "resembles the first only in being a Franciscan and a patriotic hater of the Scots" [Little, Franciscan Papers, Lists and Documents, 36]. To this can be added that both authors (or their Augustinian Lanercost editors) knew the northern border lands quite well.

manuscripts

British Library, Cotton Claudius D. vii. (oldest surviving manuscript).

editions

Chronicon de Lanercost (1839). In part available online.

The Chronicle of Lanercost, 1272-1346, trans. Herbert Maxwell (1913). Available via Archive.org.

literature

Wadding, Scriptores, 217; A.G. Little, 'The authorship of the Lanercost chronicle', English Historical Review 31 (1916), 269-79, and 32 (1917), 48-49; A.G. Little, Franciscan Papers, Lists and Documents (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1943), 35-54; Norris J. Lacy, 'Chronicon de Lanercost', in: The New Arthurian Encyclopedia (New York: Garland, 1996), 94; Annette Kehnel, ‘The narrative tradition of the medieval Franciscan friars on the British Isles. Introduction to the sources’, Franciscan Studies 63 (2005), 461-530 (509); Diana B. Tyson, ‘Two Prophecies and a Talking Head - An Anglo-Norman Text in the Lanercost Chronicle’, Nottingham Medieval Studies 53 (2009), 39-52; Fernando Pereira dos Santos, ‘A construção da imagem de Eduardo II na Scalacronica e na Chronicle of Lanercost’, Roda da Fortuna 1 (2012), 230-247.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Paviensis (Thomas Tusci, ca. 1212-ca. 1284)

Italian friar from Pavia. He studied at Padua around 1229 and entered the Franciscan order aeither that year or shortly thereafter. In 1245 he accompagnied the general vicar Bonaventura of Iseo to the council of Lyon. Eight years later, in 1253, he traveled to Greece, Dalmatia, Bohemia and the German Empire. After his return, he was appointed lector theologiae, first in Parma and later in Bologna and Ferrara. Before 1258, he was elected provincial minister for the Tuscany province, a post that he kept (either or not with some interruptions due to his travels) until 1278. As provincial minister, he took part in the general chapter of Paris (1266). The year thereafter, he followed Charles I of Anjou to Southern Italy (Thomas was a familiarius of the Anjou family).

He wrote around 1279 the Gesta imperatorum et pontificum. It is a rather anecdotical world chronicle with many moral exempla, running from Emperor August to the author's own time (last Emperor mentioned in Rudolph of Hambsburg, 1278). De kroniek is grotendeels opgebouwd uit excerpten van andere kronieken, met name uit de kroniek van Martin van Troppau en uit het Speculum historiale van Vincent van Beauvais. De nadruk ligt op de 'gesta' van de keizers. De pausen komen op de tweede plaats. Geografisch en thematisch concentreert de auteur zich op Italië en de noormannen-koningen. Ook deze franciskaanse kroniek geeft in de allereerste plaats veel gegevens enanecdotes geschikt voor de pastorale activiteiten van franciskaanse en andere medebroeders. Thomas is mogelijk ook de auteur van de Dialogus de gestis sanctorum fratrum minorum. Dit is een reeks levensbeschrijvingen van dertiende-eeuwse minderbroeders van de eerste generatie, doorspekt met edificerende passages. Het werk houdt het midden tussen een vita en een biografische geschiedenis. Thomas wordt ook wel genoemd als de auteur van de Pseudo Bonaventuriaanse Ars Concionandi. Salimbene bericht voorts dat hij een Tractatus sermonum schreef (voor info van Salimbene over Thomas, zie zijn Chronica, ed. Holder-Egger, p. 217. Het hoofdwerk van Thomas is de gigantische (en grotendeels niet ge-editeerde) Opus in theologia, of de Dictionarium Bovis, een groot bijbels woordenboek met theologisch commentaar en excerpten uit de kerkvaders (met name Augustinus, Gregorius, en Bernardus). Het werk heeft duidelijk de pastorale activiteit voor ogen.

manuscripts

Dictionarium Bovis: Florence, Bibl. Laurenziana Mss S. Crucis, Plut. XXVIII sin., cod. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9; Florence Bib. Laurenziana Plut. XXIX sin, cod. 1

Gesta imperatorum et pontificum: .a.o. Florence, Bibliotheca Medicea Laurenziana, Plut. 21 Sin. 5

editions

E. Ehrenfeuchter (ed.), Thomae Tusci Gesta Imperatorum et Pontificum, MGH SS. XXII, 1872, 483-528 [deeleditie]; Thomae Tusci Gesta Imperatorum et Pontificum, ed. A. Boehmer, Fontes Rerum Germanicarum IV (Stuttgart, 1868).

F.M. Delorme (ed.) Dialogus de gestis sanctorum fratrum minorum auctore fr. Thomae de papia. (Bibl. Franc. Asc. Medii Aevi, 5) Quaracchi, 1923. See also Fonti agiografiche dell’Ordine Francescano: Passione dei santi frati martiri in Marocco. Dialogo sulle gesta dei santi frati Minori. Vite di Antonio di Padova: Vita prima o Leggenda “Assidua” – Vita seconda – Legenda “Benignitas” – Legenda Raimondina – Legenda Rigaldina. Vita Perugina – Vita Leonina – Detti del beato Egidio di Assisi, Atti del beato Francesco e dei suoi compagni, ed. Maria Teresa Dolso (Padua: Efr-Editrici Francescane, 2014) [Review in Collectanea Franciscana 85:1-2 (2015), 300-303].

Golubovich, Biblioteca Bio-Bibliografica della terra Sancta, I (1906), 309-316.

Dictionarium Bovis (fragments) in: I mistici. Scritti dei mistici francescani: Secolo XIII, I, ed. L. Iriarte et. al. (Assisi, 1995), 727, 733-754.

literature

Sbaralea, Supplementum I. 59; Supplementum. III. 138; G. Golubovich, Biblioteca bio-bibliografica della Terra Santa e dell’Oriente Francescano I (Quaracchi, 1906), 126-128, 309-312; B. Schmeidler, Italienische Geschichtsschreiber (Leipzig, 1909), 49-52; AFH 12 (1919), 344, 382-384; E. Longpré, `Les `distinctiones' de fr. Thomas de Pavie O.F.M.', AFH, 16 (1923), 3-33; F. Baethgen, 'Franziskanische Studien.' Historische Zeitschrift 131 (1925), 447-448; Studi Francescani 3 (1931), 194; N. Papini, ‘Minoritae Conventuales Lectores’, MiscellaneaFrancescana 34 (1934), 122-124; D.Berg, 'Studien zur Geschichte und Historiographie der Franziskaner im flämischen und norddeutschen Raum im 13. und beginnenden 14. Jahrhundert.' Franziskanische Studien. 65 (1983), 143 ff; Enciclopedia Cattolica XII, 249; C. Ciccarelli,`Thomas von Pavia', LMA, VIII, 722; Pierre Péano, 'Thomas de Pavie', Dictionnaire de Spiritualité XV (Paris, 1991), 867-868; B. Roest, Reading the Book of History (Groningen, 1996), passim; D. Vorreux, ‘Thomas de Pavie’, Catholicisme XIV, 1214-1215; Repertorium fontium historiae medii aevi primum ab Augusto Potthast digestum, nunc cura collegii historicum e pluribus nationibus emendatum et auctum, 11 Vols (Rome: Istituto Storico Italiano per il Medio Evo, 1962-2007) XI/3-4, 185f.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Winchelsae (d. 1437)

English friar. Might have studied at the Franciscan studium in Oxford. Later lector and guardian in London. Produced an Instructorium Providi Peregrini (1434), as well as Sermones Festivales (Cf. Schneyer, III, 802. These sermons apparently did not survive). To John is also ascribed a Donatus Devotionis, yet this ascription seems uncertain (as the author of that text refers to himself as ‘claustralis’, which suggests a monastic and not a mendicant lifestyle).

manuscripts

Instructorium Providi Peregrini (1434): MS Paris BN Lat. 2049 (15th cent.) ff. 226r-232 [‘per fratrem Thomam ordinis Minorum et lectorem Londoniensem.’ The text is addressed to Duke Charles of Orléans, and shows the influence of Gerson’s Testamentum Peregrini]

Sermones Festivales:>>>

Donatus Devotionis. Cf. A.I. Doyle, ‘The European Circulation of Three Latin Spiritual Texts’, in: Latin and Vernacular. Studies in Late Medieval Texts and Manuscripts, ed. A.J. Minnis (Cambridge, 1989), 129-146 (esp. 138-141).

literature

C.L. Kingsford, The Grey Friars of London, British Society of Franciscan Studies 6 (London, 1915), 170-171; Sharpe, Handlist, 694.

 

 

 

 

Thomas Weiss (early 16th cent.

See: Petra Weigel, ‘Thomas Weiß: Franziskaner in Eisenach, Guardian in Langensalza, Evangelischer Kaplan in Gotha’, in: Religiöse Bewegungen im Mittelalter. Festschrift für Matthias Werner, ed. Enno Bünz, Stefan Tebruck & Hans G. Walther, Veröffentlichungen der Historischen Kommission für Thüringen. Kleine Reihe, 24/ Schriftenreihe der Friedrich-Christian-Lesser-Stiftung, 19 (Cologne, 2007), 555-604.

 

 

 

 

Tiburcius Navarro (Tiburcio Navarro, fl. later 17th cent.)

OFM. Member of the Aquitanian Concepción province.

literature

AIA 25 (1926), 395; AIA 22 (1962), 315; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 154 (no. 614).

 

 

 

 

Tomasuccio de Foligno (c. 1319-1377) beatus

Franciscan tertiary. Born in Valmacinaia (Nocera Umbra). At the age of 24, Tomassucio retreated into solitude at Rigali (near Gualdo Tadino), wearing the habit of the TOR. He lived there under the direction of the hermit Pietro de Gualdo Tadino. After the death of Pietro (1367), Tomasuccio continued his life of retreat near Valdigorgo until 1370, when he embarked on a life as itinerant preacher in the March of Ancona and Tuscany. He went as pilgrim to Santiago da Compostella, to continue his itinerant preaching at Genoa and Tuscany after his return. In 1373 he was back in Umbria, to end up in Foligno, where he served for some time the hospital of La Santa Trinità. According to his biographer and disciple Giusto della Rosa, he died there in September 1377 (The Martyrologium Franciscanum (Rome, 1938), 359 commemorates him on 15 September).One of Tomasuccio’s visions, as well as his more famous Profezie have survived.

editions

Visio Paradisi/Visione de la festa che fanoli sancti in paradiso el di de ogni sancti, ed. M. Faloci Pulignani, in: Miscellanea Francescana 8 (1901), 148-158 [During one of his journeys, travelling from Assisi to Nocera Umbra, Tomasuccio visited a derelict church, where he received a vision of the saints in glory. He related his vision to one of his travel companions].

Profezie, ed. M. Faloci Pulignani, in: Miscellanea Francescana 1 (1886), 81-88, 121-125, 151-157, 173-182 [A versified lamentation/prophecy in 212 verses, deploring the sins of time, the strife, the schism between Urban VI and Clement VII, and announcing the punishment of several cities of central Italy (a.o. Lucca, Perugia, Venice, Ferrara, Bologna, Genoa). He also sees better times ahead, expecting a ‘degno pastore’ who would re-establish order and rejuvenate the world and religion. The work has survived in a range of manuscripts, and has received several editions].

vita

His vita by Giusto della Rosa has been edited as: Leggenda del Beato Tomasuzio Profeta di Dio del Terzo Ordine di Sancto Francesco, ed. M. Faloci Pulignani, Miscellanea Francescana 31 (1931), 244-251; 32 (1932), 6-17, 53-67/ Leggenda del Beato Tomasuzio Profeta di Dio del Terzo Ordine di Sancto Francesco, ed. M. Faloci Pulignani (Gubbio, 1932).

literature

E. Filippini, ‘Per una visione francescana del Trecento’, La Bibliofilia 9 (1907), 201-205; Bibliotheca Sanctorum (Vatican City, 1969) XII, 614-616; Il B. Tomasuccio da Foligno, Terziaro Francescano, ed i movimenti popolari umbri nel Trecento, ed. R. Pazzelli, Analecta Tertii Ordinis Regularis 14, n. 131 (Rome, 1979) [= Analecta TOR 131 (1979), 495-513]; M.Tabarini, L’Umbria si racconta Dizionario (Foligno, 1982) III, 478-479; DSpir XV, 1033-1034;>>>>

 

 

 

 

Toribio de Benavente (Toribio de Paredes/Toribio de Benavente o Motolinía/Toribio de Motolinía, ca. 1491-1565)

OFMObs. From Benavente (Zamora, Spain). Entered the order in the Santiago province. After studies in the Santiagio province, he travelled to Mexico in 1523/4 (as one of the twelve Franciscan ‘apostles’, among whom was Martín de Valencia), where he worked as a missionary in the Santo Evangelio province. Took on the name Motolinia/Motilinía (‘the poor one’ according to one of the indigenous languages). Worked not only in Mexico, but also in Guatemala and Nicaragua. In any case involved with the creation of the Franciscan Guatemala custody in 1543 or 1544. He returned to Mexico early 1546. Toribio/Benavente became well-acquainted with several American languages, and wrote a number of historiographical/ethnographical works. Probably died in Mexico on the 10th of August, 1565.

vitae

Vida de Fray Toribio de Motolinía, Colección de escritores mexicanos, 4 (Mexico, 1944).

manuscripts

Camino del Espiritu:>>>

Epístola proemial de un fraile menor, al ilustrísimo Antonio Pimentel, conde sexto de Benavente, sobre la relación de los ritos antiguos, idiolatrías y sacrificios de los indios de la Nueva España, y de la maravillosa conversión que Dios ha obrado. Declárase en esta epístola el origen de los que poblaron y se enseñorearon en la Nueva España (...):MS Escorial, Biblioteca del Monasterio?; New York, Huntington Library>>>

Guerras de los Indios de la Nueva España:>>>

La vida y muerte de tres niños de Tlaxcalaque murieron por la confessión de la fé:>>>

Tratados de materias espirituales y devotas:>>>

Venida de los doce primeros padres, y loche llegades acá hicieron:>>>

editions

Memoriales de Fray Toribio de Motolinia. Manuscrito de la colección del Señor Don Joaquín García Icazbalceta, ed. Luis Garcia Pimentel (Mexico-Paris-Madrid, 1903); Memoriales o Libro de las cosas de la Nueva España y de los naturales de ella, ed. Edmund O’Gorman, Serie de historiadores y cronistas de Indias, 2 (Mexico, 1971).

Historia de los Indios de la Nueva Espana. The first, incomplete edition appeared as: Ritos antiguos, sacrificios e idolatrías de los Indios de la Nueva España, y de su conversión a la fe, y quiénes fueron los que primero la predicaron, in: Antiquities of Mexico, ed. Edward King, Viscount Kingsborough IX (London, 1848); Historia de los Indios de la Nueva España, ed. J. García Icazbalceta, in: Colección de documentos para la historia de Mexico, I (Mexico: J.M. de Andrade, 1858) I, 1-249. This edition starts with a set of Noticias de la vida y escritos de Fray Toribio de Benavente o Motolinía; Ritos antiguos, sacrificios e idolatrías de los Indios de la Nueva España, in: Colección de documentos inéditos para la historia de España, Vol. 53 (Madrid, 1869), 297-597; Historia de los Indios de la Nueva España, escrita a mediados del siglo XVI por el R.P. Fr. Toribio de Benabente o Motolinia de la order de San Francisco, ed. Daniel Sánchez Garcia (Barcelona: Juan Gil, 1914/Reprint Mexico: Salvador Chácez Hayhoe, 1941); Historia de los indios de la Nueva España (Mexico: Editora Nacional, 1956); History of the Indians of New Spain, ed. & trans. Elizabeth Andros Foster, Cortés Society, N.S., 4 (Berkeley, 1950); History of the Indians of New Spain, trans. Francis Borgia Steck, Academy of American Franciscan History, Documentary Series, 1 (Washington, 1951) [Includes the Epistola Premial and the Historia de los Indios de Nueva Espana]; Ritos antiguos, sacrificios e idolatrías de los indios de la Nueva España, y de la conversión a la fe, y quiénes fueron los que primero la predicaron (Vaduz: Krauss, 1966); Historia de los indios de la Nueva España, relación de los ritos antiguos, idolatrias y sacraficios de los indios de la Nueva España, y de la maravillosa conversión que Dios en ellos ha obrado, ed. Edmund O'Gorman, Col. Sepan cuantos (...), 129 (Mexico: Porrúa, 1969); Relación de los ritos antiguos, idolatrias y sacraficios de los indios de la Nueva España, y de la maravillosa conversión que Dios en ellos ha obrado, ed. Javier O. Aragón (Mexico, 1979); Historia de los indios de la Nueva España, ed. Claudio Esteva Fabregat, Crónicas de Americas (Madrid: Historia, 16, 1985).

Toribio de Benavente, El libro perdido. Ensayo de reconstrucción de la obra histórica extravida de fray Toribio, ed. Edmundo O’Gorman (Mexico: Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes, 1990).

Carta del P. Toribio Motilinia a la muy noble ciudad e Guatemala (21 October 1545), ed. García Icazbalceta, in: Colección de documentos para la historia de Mexico, I (Mexico, 1858), Lxxx.

Carta del P. Toribio Motilinia al principe de España don Felipe (25 July, 1548), ed. in: Cartas de Indias (Madrid, 1877), 33.

Carta de fr. Toribio Motolinia y fr. Diego de Olarte a D. Luis de Velasco, Virrey de la Nueva España sobre los tributos que pagaban los Indios antes de su conversion (27 August, 1554) & Carta al Emperador Carlos V (2 January, 1555), ed. Sanchez Garcia, in: Historia de los Indios de la Nueva Espana, ed. Daniel Sanchez Garcia (Barcelona, 1914), 257-277.

Doctrina cristiana en lengua mejicana (Mexico: Esteban Martín, 1537) [? Maybe this is the Libro de doctrina cristiana of Gutiero González]

Doctrina cristiana en lengua de Guatemala (Mexico, 1550).

Calendario mexicano/Calendario de los Tarascos, ed. N. Léon, in: Anales del museo Michoacano 1 (Morelia, 1888), 34-39.

Comedias o autos religiosos, en mejicano [among these pieces of drama (originally written in Tlaxcala?], we can distinguish the: Anunciación del nacimiento del Bautista; Anunciación de la Virgen; Visitación de nuestra Señora; Nacimiento del Precursor; Asunción de l Virgen; Tentaciones del Señor; Predicación de san Francisco; El sacrificio de Isaac; Caída de Adán y Eva. Cf: M. Rodríguez Pazos,‘El teatro franciscano en Méjico, durante el siglo XVI’, AIA 1 (1951), 148-163.]

literature

Gonzaga, De Origine Seraphicae Religionis (Rome, 1587), 1235f.; José Fernando Ramirez, Noticias de la vida y escritos de fray Toribio de Benavente o Motilinía, uno de los primeros católicos y fundadores de la provincia mexicana del santo Evangelio (Mexico, 1859), also published in: García Icazbalceta, in: Colección de documentos para la historia de Mexico, I (Mexico, 1858), xliii-cliii; Marcellina da Civezza, Storia universale delle missioni francescane VII, part 2, 646-882; AIA 3 (1915), 310-312; Atanasio López, ‘Fr. Toribio de Motolinia’, El eco franciscano 32 (1915), 713-717, 33 (1916), 14-18, 34 (1917), 65-68; L. Lemmens, Geschichte der Franziskanermissionen, 200-224; Catálogo de los escritores franciscanos de la provincia serafica del Santissimo Nombre de Jesus de Guatemala (Guatemala,1920), 66-68; Atanasio López, ‘Escribio Fr. Toribio Motolinia una obra intitulada ‘Guerra de los indios de a Nueva España’ o ‘Historia de la conquista de Méjico’?’, AIA 23 (1925), 221-247; A. Van den Wyngaert, ‘Benavente’, DHGE VII, 1034-1035; Sarah Banks, ‘Fr. Toribio Benavente (Motolinía): a selected Bibliography’, AIA 32 (1972), 463-482; G. Canedo, ‘Toribio Motolina and his historical writings’, The Americas 29 (1973), 277-307; Agustín Millares, ‘Toribio Motolinia, OFM’, Diccionario de historia ecclesiástica de España, 4Vols (Madrid, 1972-1975), III, 1746; Manuel de Castro, Bibliografía de las bibliografias franciscanas españolas e hispanoamericanas, Publicaciones de Archivo Ibero-Americano (Madrid: Ed. Cisneros, 1982), 92-93 (no. 158); M. de Castro y Castro, ‘Lenguas indigenas americanas (…)’, in: Actas del II Congreso Internacional sobre los Franciscanos en el nuevo mundo (siglo XVI) (Madrid, 1988), 493-495; Jörg Stephan, ‘Ein indianisches Heer vor den Mauern Jerusalems und die Schauspielkünste des Hermán Cortés’, Wissenschaft und Weisheit 59 (1996), 261-276; Carlos García-Romeral Pérez, Bio-bibliografía de Viajeros Españoles (siglos XVI-XVII) (Madrid: Ollero & Ramos, 1998), 151-153 (nos. 638-647) [with a nice overview of Toribio's life and missionary activities]; Religion in Geschichte und Gegenwart V4, 1553; C.A. Rodríguez Ramírez,‘Criterios éticos en los escritos de Fray Toribio de Benavente (Motolinía) y Fray Bartolomé de las Casas’, Senderos 27 (2005), 169-184; Miguel-Anxo Pena González, ‘Evangelismo franciscano: Una apuesta por el hombre’, Ciencia Tomistica 133 (2006), 267-293.

 

With thanks to dr. Robin Vose

 

 

 

 

Toribio de Torralba (Toribio de Torralva, fl. 17th cent.)

OFMObs. Spanish friar and author>>>

literature

Juan de San Antonio, Bibliotheca Universa Franciscana (Madrid, 1733) III, 130; DSpir XV, 1055.

 

 

 

 

Trebazio Mareotti (d. 1599)

OFMConv. Italian friar. Controversial teacher. Author of philosophical and spiritual works.

editions

Pentelogium peripateticum… in aliquot Averroistas, de forma novissima et hominis specifica candide, lucideque pertractatum (Padua, L. Pasquato, 1577).

Prima parte de l’oratorio spirituale per tutta la settimana, da ottener la gratia di Dio et vincere le tentazioni del demonio (Ivrea, B. Cavallo, 1585).

Discorsi spirituali sopra l’oratione domenicale (Turin: A. Bianchi/Turin, 1617/1623).

literature

G. Franchini, Bibliosofia (…) di scrittori francescani conventuali (Modena, 1693), 556-557; Sbaralea, Supplementum III, 141-142; F. Balsimelli, ‘Il servo di Dio P.M. Trebazio Mareotti’, Miscellanea Francescana 49 (1949), 403-413; DSpirX, 327-328; Elena Casella, ‘Mareotti, Trebazio Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 70 (2007), 42b-44a (with additional references and biographical information).